Benjamin's Reviews > Soccernomics: Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey--and Even Iraq--Are Destined to Become the Kings of the World's Most Popular Sport

Soccernomics by Simon Kuper
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Jan 05, 2010

liked it
bookshelves: nonfiction
Recommended for: People who love the WSJ sports page
Read in January, 2010 , read count: 1

Think of this book less as an illustration of how soccer works, and more as an introduction to what economists actually do, using soccer as a good illustration. Game theory comes to life when examined from the perspective of a player taking a penalty kick. The art of quantifying benefits to a community from taking a certain corse of action is demonstrated by looking at what a community actually gets from hosting a World Cup. And the challenge of creating a good model that will predict success is illustrated through a number of chapters that try to estimate why countries succeed at World Cups. I think some of the analysis is probably a little shallow (not that the authors couldn’t have gone deeper, they just needed to keep the book interesting), and at times, the authors sometimes seem a bit too willing to throw out outliers, but I think overall, this book is a good way to fool yourself into learning a bit about statistical analysis.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Avnish Anand This book has two editions published by different publishers. Moreover, both have been published in 2009. What is the difference in the two editions? thanks


Benjamin I don't know- I read the kindle version.


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