Linda's Reviews > The Bones of Paris

The Bones of Paris by Laurie R. King
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Jun 30, 2017

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bookshelves: france, hist-fic, mystery-crime

Laurie King transports her readers to Jazz Age Paris in the second entry in her Harris Stuyvesant series. Harry is still trying to recover from a long defunct romance, so he accepts a request to look into the disappearance of Philippa Crosby, with whom he had a brief fling on the Riviera. Pip, as she's known, has been skirting the fringes of the Parisian demi-monde , modeling for artists such as Man Ray and hobnobbing with Hemingway and his cronies. The surreal and macabre nature of some of her belongings disturb Harry initially.  But when he traces Pip's activities to the Theatre du Grand-Guignol, a venue famous for its depraved and violent program, his concerns skyrocket. 

Stuyvesant is a morose, rather cynical character, and when his lost love, Sarah,  turns up in the company of Man Ray, it throws him; as a result Harry throws himself into the seamy, often secretive midnight bar scene frequented by artists and writers. Interestingly, he's developed a real attraction to Pip's flatmate, but his dark mood and careless habits threaten to wreck the relationship before it begins. During the course of his investigation, he finds himself immersed in a subculture that meets in Paris' infamous catecombs to celebrate the cult of "death pornography". Harry begins to receive messages meant to encourage him to quit the search, and when he persists, his casual mistress is shot to death on the streets. Harry connects with a city detective who, because of Harry's former association with J. Edgar Hoover, is willing to work with him, undercover, bien sur. To their horror, many more young women have disappeared.

The appeal of this novel lies in its ambience, the view it provides into the dark underside of the City of Light. The investigation itself is rather slow, with a shot of real suspense saved for the final chapters. It's fun to encounter the rich and famous, though the only ones portrayed in any depth are Kiki de Montparnasse and Man Ray. Harry himself, in spite of his self-defeating choices, is likable for his humanity and genuine sense of justice. King's writing, of course, is good as ever.  Not a "page turner", but did keep my interest from start to finish. 
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Reading Progress

August 6, 2013 – Shelved
August 6, 2013 – Shelved as: to-read
May 18, 2017 – Started Reading
May 27, 2017 – Finished Reading
June 30, 2017 – Shelved as: france
June 30, 2017 – Shelved as: hist-fic
June 30, 2017 – Shelved as: mystery-crime

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