Luboš's Reviews > Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Clean Code by Robert C. Martin
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really liked it
bookshelves: software-development
Read 2 times. Last read June 13, 2017 to July 6, 2017.

I should have read this book at the beginning of my career. On the other hand, after 10 years experience I may appreciate it even more. It is sad, that principles described in the book are not yet heavily adopted.
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Quotes Luboš Liked

Robert C. Martin
“You should name a variable using the same care with which you name a first-born child.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“You are reading this book for two reasons. First, you are a programmer. Second, you want to be a better programmer. Good. We need better programmers.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Why does good code rot so quickly into bad code? We have lots of explanations for it. We complain that the requirements changed in ways that thwart the original design. We bemoan the schedules that were too tight to do things right. We blather about stupid managers and intolerant customers and useless marketing types and telephone sanitizers. But the fault, dear Dilbert, is not in our stars, but in ourselves. We are unprofessional.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Clean code always looks like it was written by someone who cares.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Indeed, many of the recommendations in this book are controversial. You will probably not agree with all of them.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“the ratio of time spent reading vs. writing is well over 10:1.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Professionals use their powers for good and write code that others can understand.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“The first rule of functions is that they should be small. The second rule of functions is that they should be smaller than that.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“If your function must change the state of something, have it change the state of its owning object.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Code formatting is important. It is too important to ignore and it is too important to treat religiously. Code formatting is about communication, and communication is the professional developer’s first order of business.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Encapsulation is broken because all functions in the path of a throw must know about details of that low-level exception. Given that the purpose of exceptions is to allow you to handle errors at a distance, it is a shame that checked exceptions break encapsulation in this way.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Returning null from methods is bad, but passing null into methods is worse.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“What this team did not realize was that having dirty tests is equivalent to, if not worse than, having no tests.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“If you let the tests rot, then your code will rot too. Keep your tests clean.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“To write clean code, you must first write dirty code and then clean it.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“One of the best ways to ruin a program is to make massive changes to its structure in the name of improvement. Some programs never recover from such “improvements.” The problem is that it’s very hard to get the program working the same way it worked before the “improvement.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Nothing has a more profound and long-term degrading effect upon a development project than bad code. Bad schedules can be redone, bad requirements can be redefined. Bad team dynamics can be repaired. But bad code rots and ferments, becoming an inexorable weight that drags the team down.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Robert C. Martin
“Of course bad code can be cleaned up. But it’s very expensive.”
Robert C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship


Reading Progress

July 26, 2013 – Shelved
July 26, 2013 – Shelved as: to-read
March 24, 2016 –
page 45
10.37%
March 29, 2016 – Started Reading
April 1, 2016 –
page 99
22.81%
April 20, 2016 –
page 156
35.94%
May 2, 2016 – Shelved as: software-development
May 2, 2016 – Finished Reading
June 13, 2017 – Started Reading
July 6, 2017 – Finished Reading

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