Dolors's Reviews > The Stranger

The Stranger by Albert Camus
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it was amazing
bookshelves: read-in-2014, dost
Recommended to Dolors by: Ian "Marvin" Graye
Recommended for: Nonconformist outsiders

My first encounter with Camus and with the stranger that had been hiding inadvertently within me during all these years left me quite perplexed. Is the title of Camus’s novel that obvious? Who is truly “The Stranger” here? The disenchanted narrator of a story with no real plotline and no definite answers? The faceless mass of people who loathe and condemn him according to arbitrary morality? The alien countenance that stares back at me in the mirror on a muddled succession of monotonous Mondays? Aren’t we all strangers in this confusing world where time is an agreed convention that really doesn’t exist?

“It occurred to me that somehow I’d got through another Sunday, that Mother now was buried, and tomorrow I’d be going back to work as usual. Really, nothing in my life had changed.” (p.18)

I could never get to the bottom of Mr. Meursault’s psyche. An indolent bon vivant who didn’t cry at his Mother’s funeral or who was incapable of repentance after having killed an Arab at the shores of an Algerian beach because his presence annoyed him and because it was scorchingly hot.
Incarcerated and deprived from his liberty, Mr. Meursault’s apathy gradually transforms into a wish to cling to life amidst the congenial indifference of the universe surrounding him. He learns to find contentment “gazing up at the patch of sky just overhead” or “watching for the passing birds or drifting clouds” or “waiting for dusk to come as a mournful solace”. The little window of Meursault’s cell and his accumulated memories grow to be his only means to mental freedom while the concept of time dissolves and becomes senseless and indivisible.
Whether he lives or dies is indifferent to him and he accepts his “being” only in the present undisturbed by past or future. An opaque reflection of an aseptic man defined by a sequence of actions is all the reader gets, for Meursault becomes an impenetrable character with no other principle than to accept the organized chaos of existence and his own nothingness.

One won’t find answers in this moralistic novel, only an orchestra of painstakingly chosen words that compose a concise and compressed prose, which in turn describes detailed scenes and casts many obscure shadows. Words are hollow and don’t carry essence. It is in the silences between the haltering sentences or in the passages with sporadic lyricism when the void of Meursault’s existence can be heard rather than understood.
If both the main character and the prose remain elusive, what can be inferred then from mere acts? A condemned man whose biggest crime is refusing to behave accordingly to political correctness and to human nature, if something as such exists. He showed no feeling when his Mother passed away! Guilty. “An inhuman monster wholly without a moral sense”. Guilty. “A criminal at heart”. Guilty. “A menace to society”. Guilty. Meanwhile the remorseless assassin reads a scrap of newspaper that contains the story of a prodigal son murdered by his own Mother. The irony of it all.

Enlightened atheist? Pacifist revolutionary? This novel breathes out all the false contradictions that are in fact a reflection of an extreme coherence amidst the absurdity of existence. The term “Absurdity” is much more than a word but a bit less than a concept. It is the unequivocal rupture between mankind’s obsession to find meaning in the mute response of the universe. “Absurdity” might be unacceptable as an abstract idea or a doctrine, but when it is experienced rather than studied, one can learn to accept it in quiet rebellion, like Meursault did. I can’t claim I understood his actions but the outsider in me did. Similarly, I can’t corroborate Camus being a philosopher, but I admire this spontaneous freethinker who jumped into the abyss of reality with nothing else than his ruffian hunger for living and the gutsy insolence of not accepting a thoughtless existence.
In the absurd then, I learn to live.
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Reading Progress

June 1, 2013 – Shelved
April 16, 2014 – Started Reading
April 17, 2014 –
page 61
49.59% "His eyes were streaming with tears, of exhaustion or distress, or both together. But because of the wrinkles they couldn't flow down. They spread out, crisscrossed, and formed a smooth gloss on the old, worn face."
April 18, 2014 –
page 123
100.0% ""It was as if that great rush of anger had washed me clean, emptied me of hope, and, gazing up at the dark sky spangled with its signs and stars, for the first time, the first, I laid my heart open to the benign indifference of the universe.""
April 19, 2014 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-39 of 39 (39 new)

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Apr 24, 2014 08:20PM) (new)

Your stellar review causes me to ponder and question my own lukewarm reaction to this book. Dolors, you poignantly ask, "The alien countenance that stares back at me in the mirror on a muddled succession of monotonous Mondays? Aren’t we all strangers in this confusing world where time is an agreed convention that really doesn’t exist?" Now you have me questioning what I saw in myself when I recently read this book. Guilty! :) I think you are on to something. Some of us (at least somedays--perhaps Mondays most of all) are strangers to ourselves. Guilty!

Also I think it insightful how you show the little window of Meursault’s cell and his accumulated memories grow to be his only means to mental freedom. Orwell said in 1984 that the only space you own is that few cubic centimeters inside your head, and that's why the thought police want that too. Perhaps you are right, this book can be only heard in silence rather than understood. Perhaps, as you suggest, one can experience the absurdity without surrendering to the abstract notion of it. Thanks for this marvelous review, which speaks to the outsider in all of us. I may prefer meaning, but I will also take "the ruffian hunger for living and the gutsy insolence of not accepting a thoughtless existence " that you so eloquently describe. Thoughtful, simple, and lyrical review--much like Camus' elegant novella. I recognize your unique and gifted voice in this review. Because I recognize you--you are no stranger--but then again, it's not Monday either.


Himanshu What a review Dolors! The best I have come across for this little gem of a book. I couldn't help saying 'Bingo!' at each of your paragraphs. You mirrored my thoughts completely, especially in these words:

It is in the silences between the haltering sentences or in the passages with sporadic lyricism when the void of Meursault’s existence can be hearda rather than understood.

This book certainly doesn't give you solace. It just questions the routine that life is. Wonderfully done! :)


Praj One won’t find answers in this moralistic novel, only an orchestra of painstakingly chosen words that compose a concise and compressed prose, which in turn describes detailed scenes and casts many obscure shadows. Words are hollow and don’t carry essence.

What a brilliant way of signifying the spirit of the book. And, such a brilliant and meticulous eludication of Camus's prose. Dolors, your words made me speechless.

In the absurd then, I learn to live.

How true is this sentence! I think I like you even more:)


Soumen Daschoudhury A beautiful review on what seems to be a difficult subject. Makes me wanna pick up the book and start reading it right away. You really deep dive and come up with some precious pearls.

Be happy!


Garima A review to save, print and keep as a worthy preface for this book which I'm yet to read. A review to behold. Amazing work as always, Dolors Dearest. Many things, several emotions and myriad relations are overrated in this world and I reckon, Camus has simply tried to show us the same with his words here. I can't wait to find out how right or wrong I am.


message 6: by Samadrita (last edited Apr 26, 2014 07:33AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Samadrita Yes! How brilliantly yet sensitively you have summarized Meursault's view of life. I am sure Camus would have been proud of your assessment and accurate understanding of the work. I could empathize with the absurdist vein in the work but a worldview like Meursault's is contrary to the spirit of civilization and human morality as we know it which is why I gave it 3 stars.
I guess I am more of an 'art is propaganda' than an 'art for art's sake' kind of girl.


Dolors Louisa wrote: "'Words are hollow and don’t carry essence. It is in the silences between the haltering sentences or in the passages with sporadic lyricism when the void of Meursault’s existence can be heard rather..."

There wasn't much to get inspiration from in sterile Meursault so I clung to the infrequent poetry and the detailed descriptions of the scenery and the people he encountered to make my own meaning.
I am glad this review brought you back good recollections of your encounter with this stranger and to confirm that some words, like the ones in your comments, are loaded with essence. Thank you very much for your encouragement Louisa, you just made my Friday and probably my weekend as well! :)


message 8: by Dolors (last edited Apr 25, 2014 03:22AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Steve Sckenda wrote: "Your stellar review causes me to ponder and question my own lukewarm reaction to this book. Dolors, you poignantly ask, "The alien countenance that stares back at me in the mirror on a muddled su..."

Thank God it's not Monday Horribilis and I don't have to face the stranger in the mirror yet! :)
Steve, you can't imagine how much I value your comment, specially knowing how valiantly you rebelled against this "inhuman" character and the concept of absurdity, which goes so much against your optimistic nature. I am also continually wrestling with myself, searching for meaning, the same way you do. And you see, I even managed to create some sort of sense amidst the absurdity of this novella! :) I might be wrong, but I detected some hopeful defiance disguised with nonchalantly in Camus' simple and aseptic words. I even thought the lyrical flashes of sensitivity contradicted Meursault's claim for indifference and Camus' defense of absurdity ruling existence. But that might be only me and my obstinate quest to find poetry everywhere, as you well know, for we are not strangers! :) Thank you for celebrating my invitation to ponder and for getting exactly what I tried to portray in this review, my well known friend, Monday or no Monday! :)


message 9: by Dolors (last edited Apr 25, 2014 03:29AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Himanshu wrote: "This book certainly doesn't give you solace. It just questions the routine that life is"

I found myself echoing your "Bingo!" when I read your concluding sentence Himanshu. I couldn't agree more on that reading of Meursault's story, although I guess one can get many underlying meanings out of this apparently nonsensical novella and I guess that's why it generates so much controversy among readers. Thank you for your thoughtful comment and your generosity, Himanshu, highly appreciated.


Dolors Praj wrote: "One won’t find answers in this moralistic novel, only an orchestra of painstakingly chosen words that compose a concise and compressed prose, which in turn describes detailed scenes and casts many ..."

I am humbled beyond words -not hollow, but oh, so imprecise! - with your comment Praj, specially because you are the only muse of immaculate prose and singing imagery here. Thank you so much for being willing to join me in the absurdity of life, even nothingness looks brighter with the appropriate company! :)


message 11: by Dolors (last edited Apr 25, 2014 03:38AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Soumen wrote: "A beautiful review on what seems to be a difficult subject. Makes me wanna pick up the book and start reading it right away. You really deep dive and come up with some precious pearls.

Be happy!"


Controversial novel, indeed. Very perceptive comment Soumen and the best advice as a corollary. If there was something I admired about this hollow character was his ability to find happiness in the small pleasures of life. Talking about contradictions, heh. Thank you so much for reading and for stopping by to share your thoughts. I hope you get to Camus soon so I can read your impressions! :)


Dolors Garima wrote: "A review to save, print and keep as a worthy preface for this book which I'm yet to read. A review to behold. Amazing work as always, Dolors Dearest. Many things, several emotions and myriad relati..."

You summarize the novel masterfully without even having read it Garima Dearest. You nail it when you address the overrated heroism that surrounds Camus' torpid character. I tried not to idealize the rebellious anti-hero that some people see in Meursault, he was an unfathomable character for me. Some might even consider the novel preposterous as it tries to victimize a murderer after all. I chose the path of abstraction and drew my own conclusions, addressing absurdity as a consequence to endure rather than a leitmotif in which to act or more probably not act!:) I will be waiting anxiously for your thoughts, whatever they might be, on this stranger and Camus' irreverent voice. As usual, your comment is a shot of adrenaline that has left me elated and ready to soar the Barcelona skies. Thank you, Garima.


message 13: by Dolors (last edited Apr 25, 2014 04:08AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Samadrita wrote: "Yes! How brilliantly yet sensitively you have summarized Mersault's view of life. I am sure Camus would have been proud of your assessment and accurate understanding of the work. I could empathize..."

Nodding profusely in agreement here Samadrita. Absurdity as guideline to rule mankind's actions is unthinkable to me, you're talking to a helpless romantic here!:) But I chose to understand Camus' novel, which might be naive, maybe even juvenile, as a muffled yet defiant proclamation to cling to life in spite of all the chaotic uncertainty that is interwoven with the act of existence. I certainly want to explore more of Camus' works and I already bought "The Plague" and a collection of his essays. Thanks Samadrita for your invigorating approval, breathing much easier now! :)


message 14: by Harry (new)

Harry Ok, haven't read this and I confess that I probably won't, but that's because I'm a plot lover. Cause and effect lead to plot, human choices lead to plot, values and desires lead to plot so to my mind, the message can be articulated while including some sort of plot...because it's so human and a large portion of who we are and what we do involve not just thoughts, but how we act on those thoughts. You can't do that if there's no plot...and to my preferences that leaves half the equation out. All of the above, of course, is just my take and personal opinion on what I read and why I read the books that I do. Just imagine Les Miserables without a plot, it would be an impossible read. Books without plot should be brief (as this book appears to be) :-)

Having said that, I think this review, Dolors, lays aside some of your more poetically rendered passages and has instead given me a rendering of a more calculating part of who you are as a reader. I really get a clear idea of the contents of The Stranger and what I might expect in reading it. Sometimes the snippets removed from sentences provide clarity and you've done a superb job of it in this one. I think this is one of your best reviews yet.


kaśyap Thanks for the review. I have to say that i enjoyed reading this review more than the book. I was very underwhelmed with the book. probably because i was expecting something more like Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche and kierkegaard.
I think this sentence of yours really sums up the book.
Similarly, I can’t corroborate Camus being a philosopher, but I admire this spontaneous freethinker who jumped into the abyss of reality with nothing else than his ruffian hunger for living and the gutsy insolence of not accepting a thoughtless existence.
In the absurd then, I learn to live.


What camus leaves us with is to revolt against the absurd. To face the absurd by living. But he doesn't go beyond that. By giving the choice to the self, he leaves us with an ethical hole if everything is then arbitrary.


Florencia Aren’t we all strangers in this confusing world where time is an agreed convention that really doesn’t exist?

It is in the silences between the haltering sentences or in the passages with sporadic lyricism when the void of Meursault’s existence can be heard rather than understood.


Now, THIS is a review. All I wanted to say, all those thoughts that this book created in me and I couldn't describe, it's all there. Your lyrical voice always enlightens my path and lets me find new things, new perspectives. But the combination of your beautiful prose and a book I absolutely loved really, really made my day. My GR experience became even more rewarding. I'm so tired :P but I couldn't let another day pass without reading your thoughts on this book. And it was a wise decision! :)


Dolors Harry wrote: "Cause and effect lead to plot, human choices lead to plot, values and desires lead to plot so to my mind, the message can be articulated while including some sort of plot"
I actually think your declaration of preference for plot doesn't diverge too much from what existentialists claim. The Sartrean idea that "existence precedes essence" is written all over Camus' short novella. Actions define what we are. If we don't act, we don't exist. So I guess you could say there was "plot" in this novel as there was a chain of events described in high detail and nuance, but the main character remained an opaque and impenetrable wall, he didn't have moral values, he seemed detached, almost inhumanly honest, aseptic. So I tried to understand him through his actions.
When I referred to the novel having no plot I actually meant to say that one won't find a succession of events that will lead to a conclusion. Camus doesn't give any answers, only a hint of his passion for life in spite of the absurdity of existence.
Knowing how deep you go regarding philosophy this could be a pretty light reading for you, Harry. I seem to recall this was Camus' first work and that he wrote it before he was 30. Naivety might be written all over it, it might be an "incomplete" work, but I think he laid the foundations for his future essays which would give a broader idea of his line of thinking, which I think was honest and consequent with what this man was. And he was what he thought.
Thank you so very much for offering such a juicy comment and further food for thought and for your kindness, Harry. Always a pleasure to book dance wit you! :)


message 18: by Dolors (last edited Apr 26, 2014 01:29AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Kasyap wrote: "What camus leaves us with is to revolt against the absurd. To face the absurd by living. But he doesn't go beyond that. By giving the choice to the self, he leaves us with an ethical hole if everything is then arbitrary."

You nail it with the closing paragraph of your comment Kaysap. That's precisely what I got out of Camus' novella. I think he elaborated a bit more on the idea of absurdity and its consequences on mankind in his posterior essays and stories. This is his introductory work and many have felt underwhelmed by its lack of answers and disappointed by the sterility of this cold fish of a character, but I somehow managed to find meaning in between the sentences and the occasional lyricism, which betrayed some hints of emotion.
I have read and loved Dostoevsky, he delves deep into the psyche of his characters and offers much to ponder, but what Camus does is throw the indifference of the universe at the reader's face and dare him to cling to life in spite of his nothingness. And make him wonder. I found that courageous somehow. Glad you enjoyed the review even if the novel left you unaffected. Thanks a lot for your comment.


message 19: by Dolors (last edited Apr 26, 2014 01:34AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Florencia wrote: "Aren’t we all strangers in this confusing world where time is an agreed convention that really doesn’t exist?

It is in the silences between the haltering sentences or in the passages with sporadic..."


I am the one who is thankful for your effusive comment and for your review on this novel Florencia. You managed to point out a vital idea about Meursault that I completely failed to address. His Honesty. He was true to himself, never lied, acted accordingly to what he was. He created himself through his actions and I think will become a key aspect in Camus' forthcoming works. Thanks so very much for having found a moment to read and to post this encouraging comment in such a busy week for you. Your comments are puffs of fresh air, warm sunbeams and skies of blue. Thanks my friend, I hope you find time to relax over the weekend! :)


Rakhi Dalal An apt review,Dolors. I loved this work and I agree that being one of Camus' earliest works, where he is still trying to understand himself, what we get as a conclusion is something perplexed, unclear. But then I read his other works, including the essay 'The Rebel'( which I am yet to complete) and it became apparent how his perspective evolved as a thinker/philosopher. I'd highly recommend this essay.


message 21: by Henry (new)

Henry Avila People are an island into themselves, they only reveal what they want.Humans are complicated, puzzling animals.Stupendous review,Dolors.


message 22: by Dolors (last edited Apr 26, 2014 07:33AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Rakhi wrote: "An apt review,Dolors. I loved this work and I agree that being one of Camus' earliest works, where he is still trying to understand himself, what we get as a conclusion is something perplexed, uncl..."

Thank you very much Rakhi for taking the time to read and to comment. I know Camus is one of your favorite and that you've delved deep into his works. I precisely bought "The Plague", "The Fall" and several of his essays right after I finished The Stranger. I will now have to add"The Rebel"to that list, undoubtedly a fitting recommendation that is much appreciated.


Dolors Henry wrote: "People are an island into themselves, they only reveal what they want.Humans are complicated, puzzling animals.Stupendous review,Dolors."

Complicated animals, indeed we are. Your comment reminded me a character very dear to my heart called Ebenezer in The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, who lived in an island and who was an island himself. Thanks for your perspicacious comment Henry.


message 24: by Henry (new)

Henry Avila Heard of that book,Dolors, always wanted to read it.But I only read one book at a time.


message 25: by Ben (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ben It's been 9 or 10 years since I read this, and I've considered rereading it for some time (I don't think I was ready for it then). Reading Sartre's "Literary Essays" earlier this year (in which he discusses the work of Camus), stirred my curiosity, but your review has really pushed this work up on my 2014 reading list. A very thought-provoking and enjoyable review, Dolors.


message 26: by Dolors (last edited Apr 27, 2014 03:26PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Ben wrote: "It's been 9 or 10 years since I read this, and I've considered rereading it for some time (I don't think I was ready for it then). Reading Sartre's "Literary Essays" earlier this year (in which he ..."

That's funny Ben. I finished "Existentialism Is a Humanism" last week and I found Sartre's commentary on "The Stranger" simply brilliant. "The Stranger" was my first Camus and even knowing it might not be his best work and that many of his ideas might not have been fully developed, I found there was much packed in the simply constructed sentences and in Meursault's opaqueness, so I will make sure this not to be my last work by Camus. I will be on the lookout for your always juicy thoughts on this one. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.


message 27: by Tej (last edited Apr 29, 2014 04:21PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Tej " I can’t claim I understood his actions but the outsider in me did. "

I love the way you balanced out Camus's rendition of an 'Outsider' beautifully and the balance can be found as an outsider only, perhaps... It is such a luxury to wistfully hope for a perfect answer to this absurdity and on the flip side to ignore it all and party hard in order to avoid the abyss, the endless meanderings... The suffering is the wont of one stuck in between somewhere...

The last paragraph is a masterful ode to the 'absurd' and it was gladdening beyond words to read you after a bit... Certainly, it seems all so very simple and clear then I wonder with you the inherent absurdity that laces it so very completely... which also is so simple, clear and evident!

Dear Dolors, my irregularities here are indeed 'absurd' because these are 'elixirs' of peace and joy... your words! I wonder why life forces us to keep away from the best it has in store for us! Would earnestly wait for your tryst with 'Plague', 'The Fall' and also 'Exile and the Kingdom'....

Always...Best wishes :)


message 28: by Dolors (last edited May 04, 2014 10:49AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Dolors Tej wrote: "" I can’t claim I understood his actions but the outsider in me did. "

I love the way you balanced out Camus's rendition of an 'Outsider' beautifully and the balance can be found as an outsider on..."


My dear and long missed friend Tej. Revitalizing elixir is the perfect expression I would use to describe your comments, which always bring refreshing puffs of unadulterated air towards my way. Camus's absurdity and his pacific rebellion against the passivity of the universe spoke to the stranger in me. Either by fate or chance we are all cast into this world and we become our own actions, which arise as the only proof of our insignificant existence. We might be nothing in this vast and nonsensical universe but comments like yours enhance the goodness of mankind: friendship, commonality and congeniality are to be celebrated with each of your thoughtful words. I will go on questioning but the task will be a lot more agreeable if I have your flowing prose keeping me company. Thanks for reading and stopping by to comment, my dear friend.


Kevin Cole I don't think I can add to your review and all the comments about this book. I'll just be the one person (I hope) to ask you: Have you ever heard this song before?

http://youtu.be/dpdB0FKsQzc


message 30: by Ted (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ted "I admire this spontaneous freethinker who jumped into the abyss of reality with nothing else than his ruffian hunger for living and the gutsy insolence of not accepting a thoughtless existence.
In the absurd then, I learn to live."


Very nice, Dolors.


Dolors Thanks a lot Ted, glad you liked it! :D


Dolors Thanks a lot Desislava... And what a fatal coincidence; to read Camus and his allegorical rebellion to the absurdity of life and to be living in hell on this tragic night in Paris (referring to the multiple terrorist attacks that are spreading the panic in Europe)


Margitte I finally got to this book which reminds me a lot of Kafka's style of thought. Love your review, Dolors.


Dolors Margitte wrote: "I finally got to this book which reminds me a lot of Kafka's style of thought. Love your review, Dolors."

Good connection, Margitte. Thanks for checking out this review. I have been meaning to go back to Camus for months and I still haven't found the moment to do so, and your comment is a useful reminder of my old resolution!


Soumen Daschoudhury Aren’t we all strangers in this confusing world where time is an agreed convention that really doesn’t exist?

We are, we are! Camus and his creation raise a lot of irritating yet thoughtful questions that we can only attempt to understand and answer. And the answers, if you get any, make you more restless and leave you less satisfied.

A beautiful review Dolors; there isn't much poetry in the book as much as there is in your review!

In the absurd then, we all live.


Dolors Soumen wrote: "Aren’t we all strangers in this confusing world where time is an agreed convention that really doesn’t exist?

We are, we are! Camus and his creation raise a lot of irritating yet thoughtful questi..."


Heh, but you know I always manage to bring out the poetry in whatever book I lay my hands on.... I see you recently read this classic, so I am heading straight to your thoughts wihtout further ado. Thanks as usual for paying me a visit and for sharing your always fitting remarks, Soumen! :)


message 37: by Sean (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sean Blake Brilliant review! I'm re-reading this for the second time and am certainly looking forward to experiencing The Stranger all over again.


Dolors Sean wrote: "Brilliant review! I'm re-reading this for the second time and am certainly looking forward to experiencing The Stranger all over again."

Glad to be of service, Sean... I have been meaning to go back to Camus and still haven't managed to, maybe reading your thoughts will give me the final push to do so! :)


Gaurav I was just scanning some of the books I've read and I found this great write -up by you of one of all time favorite authors. It brings back the memories of the book or I should the chilling questions it posed. And I agree with your concluding lines to not corroborating Camus being a philosopher, for he himself said that he was an artist and not a philosopher-"I think according to words and not according to ideas." He said that search of meaning of life as futile as accepting norms/ dogmas of society. So, in a way, we may say his approach is unsystematic and anti-systematic. Hence, as an artist Camus now makes his case for acceptance of tragedy, the consciousness of absurdity, and a life of sensuous vitality. He advocates this with the image of Sisyphus straining, fully alive, and happy.
Superb write-up, Dolors :)


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