Luboš's Reviews > 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

97 Things Every Programmer Should Know by Kevlin Henney
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bookshelves: software-development
Read 2 times. Last read January 15, 2018 to February 20, 2018.

Short, easy to read and available for free. But maybe too obvious. Probably for younger me or the industry improved a lot since the book was written.

Several articles worth reading even for software veterans


The Boy Scout Rule by Uncle Bob
Act with Prudence by Seb Rose
Automate Your Coding Standard by Filip van Laenen
Beware the Share by Udi Dahan
Check Your Code First before Looking to Blame Others by Allan Kelly
Don't Be Afraid to Break Things by Mike Lewis
Encapsulate Behavior, not Just State by Einar Landre
Keep the Build Clean by Johannes Brodwall
Prefer Domain-Specific Types to Primitive Types by Einar Landre
Ubuntu Coding for Your Friends by Aslam Khan
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Quotes Luboš Liked

“When did things go wrong? Probably already at the kick-off meeting. Some of the project members didn't pay attention. Others didn't understand the point. Worse, some disagreed and were already planning their coding standard rebellion. Finally, some got the point and agreed but, when the pressure in the project got too high, they had to let something go.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“You don't have to make every module perfect before you check it in. You simply have to make it a little bit better than when you checked it out.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“Kernighan and Plauger noted that "a comment is of zero (or negative) value if it is wrong.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“Professional programming is usually not like running hard for a few kilometers, where the goal can be seen at the end of a paved road. Most software projects are more like a long orienteering marathon. In the dark. With only a sketchy map as guidance. If you just set off in one direction, running as fast as you can, you might impress some, but you are not likely to succeed. You need to keep a sustainable pace and you need to adjust the course when you learn more about where you are and where you are heading.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“We programmers are weird creatures. We love writing code. But when it comes to reading it we usually shy away. After all, writing code is so much more fun, and reading code is hard — sometimes almost impossible.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“Write code as if you had to support it for the rest of your life.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“A non-programmer friend once remarked that code looks like poetry. I get that feeling from really good code, that everything in the text has a purpose and that it's there to help me understand the idea. Unfortunately, writing code doesn't have the same romantic image aswriting poetry.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“A skilled surgeon knows that cuts have to be made in order to operate, but the skilled surgeon also
knows that the cuts are temporary and will heal. The end result of the operation is worth the initial pain, and the patient should heal to a better state than they were in before the surgery.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“Most of the best programmers I know are also very fluent in their mother's
tongue, and typically in other languages as well.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“Fixing bugs is not making progress. You aren't paid to debug. Debugging is waste.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

“Reading other people's code is particularly hard. Not necessarily because other people's code is bad, but because they probably think and solve problems in a different way to you.”
Kevlin Henney, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts


Reading Progress

May 6, 2013 – Shelved
May 6, 2013 – Shelved as: to-read
March 19, 2016 – Started Reading
March 20, 2016 – Shelved as: software-development
March 21, 2016 – Finished Reading
January 15, 2018 – Started Reading
January 27, 2018 –
50.0%
February 20, 2018 – Finished Reading

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