Angela's Reviews > The Rosie Project

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
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What a shame!
What a shame Graeme Simsion wrote this offering "quickly" and that he went with a "comedy rather than a drama".
What a shame that the opportunity to educate and illuminate was squandered and traded for gratuitous laughs ,extreme generalisations and blatant stereotyping.
My initial delight at realising the subject matter of this book meant I was immediately enrolled in ' the project'. A third of the way into the book, I became uncomfortable with the tenor and theme. The premise that higher functioning individuals on the Autistic Spectrum , or anyone for that matter who sits outside societies 'normal' framework accepts their position matter-of-factly is absurd.
Don knows he is 'weird' , inappropriate and that people make fun of him and the author suggests that Don is OK with it. So accepting of ridicule is he that he purposefully resorts to self-promotion as the class clown and nutty professor as a means of gaining some form of acceptance or acknowledgment. Don tells us that he is "an expert at being laughed at" , but Simsion never let him tell us how he felt about being so. Instead the author invites us to laugh along with an inexhaustable number of accounts of 'crazy' behaviours , thoughts and incidents throughout this 'comedy'. I waited and hoped for for the opportunity to feel Don's pain; but unfortunately his distress, sadness, vulnerability and loneliness if touched on were labels without feeling, what we regular people experience, but Asperger individuals ( according to Simsion) only know if they score highly on a questionnaire! The idea that the Don's of this world do not feel the aguish associated with isolation and rejection is no less inaccurate than they are incapable of feeling empathy or knowing how to show love.

In the 1997 movie "as Good As It Gets " ( mentioned in The Rosie Project), screenwriter Mark Andrus ensures that whilst revealing the prescriptive anxiety-provoking world of Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder , he never loses sight of the anguish and humanity that underscores the day to day reality of a person who fails to conform to societal norms. He offers the audience an opportunity to empathise as well as laugh at seemingly 'weird' behaviours of the main character Unfortunately, in his 'Rosie Project' , Simsion misses the opportunity to be a champion for his protagonist, failing to show that although Don is hard-wired neurologically to behave and respond in what makes make him a target for ridicule and isolation , that his acute awareness of how he is perceived comprimises his inner struggle and peace. Even at the end, when it seems Don has found happiness and acceptance, it was dependant on his adjustment and conformity to societies sensabilities.

Obviously I found some positives in this book. Well written, engaging and with plenty of local flavour being set in Melbourne , making for an enjoyable read. The insights offered about the inconsistencies of what society accepts of human behaviour depending on who you are or your position in life were welcomed. I also felt heartened that along with laughing at Don, the audience were also shown that if you move beyond the visible and audible irregularities of a person, we all have something to offer; that we all have value and strengths and all deserve respect and to be treated with dignity. I hope that maybe, some readers will also see beyond the comedy to the human side and perhaps even accept that maybe, we 'neurotypicals' all need to change a little , tolerate a little bit more and accept a different way of seeing things so that the marginalised in society can fit in a little bit more.
I share my life with a 'Don' and I think 'the Rosie Project' has not done his cause any favours and does not represent him faithfully, with respect or the humanity he deserves.
Again... What a shame!
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Reading Progress

April 5, 2013 – Started Reading
April 5, 2013 – Shelved
April 5, 2013 –
page 69
23.15%
April 6, 2013 –
page 197
66.11% "Starting to disappoint- will hang in there. Hoping for a strong finish"
April 10, 2013 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-50 of 69 (69 new)


message 1: by Robert (new)

Robert Elias As a high functioning aspie I laughed my t##ts off from beginning to end and helped close people to me gain an insight into my world. So sorry mate you are way off the mark. It has also helped me "conform" in your words. I would say adapt to the environment when I'm not around aspie aware people. Why should he bear the cross of championing aspies? And why should literature be about demanding total awareness? The book is about play and fun and introduction to the world of aspies. It made me feel good so 10 out of 10 for me


Angela Robert wrote: "As a high functioning aspie I laughed my t##ts off from beginning to end and helped close people to me gain an insight into my world. So sorry mate you are way off the mark. It has also helped me "..."

Thanks Robert. I too enjoyed the book, despite my misgivings.


Joyofbooks Lisa Hogarth A very serious perspective and one that is the polar opposite to mine but obviously your reaction to the book was based on your personal experiences which inevitably shapes the way we respond.


Angela Joyofbooks wrote: "A very serious perspective and one that is the polar opposite to mine but obviously your reaction to the book was based on your personal experiences which inevitably shapes the way we respond."

Thanks Joy. I wrote my review for that very reason - to provide some balance and a different perspective. My 'Don' is currently reading TRP and he says whilst it makes him feel uncomfortable he can see why readers enjoy it and find it funny (in a sitcom kind of way). He does hope that Don does not become the poster-boy for Aspies, as he does not feel represented by him, striving every day to avoid ridicule and social faux pas.


Alexandra Angela, I appreciated this review. But have to say when I was reading this I didn't feel amy scorn for Don. In fact, i found his comments on "why do people do things this way- this way would be so much more logical" to be very insightful. This makes me think that Simpson must have respect for Don, to be able to convey his views in a way that made me appreciate the good sense behind them.
As for using Don as the brunt of jokes... I never laughed AT him. The bit with the skeleton was hilarious, but i felt like the joke was on the Dean- after all, she was the one who opened Don's door without asking. I thought less of her after the incident, but it didn't hurt my opinion of Don- everyone does bizarre stuff when they think no one's watching.
And I've always felt that if a book is good, the characters' feelings can be inferred and shouldn't have to be spelled out explicitly- "he felt sad, she felt happy" gets to be a drag after awhile. And i think Simpson did a great job of implying Don's feelings; for example, although don doesnt linger much on his relationship with his father, his knee-jerk reaction when he needs to pick a fake career is "hardware store owner"- like his father.


Kristygardiner Somsion did a wonderful job with this book. Yes Don's a bit of a Forrest Gump/ Rainman stereotype but it is a story to entertain. This is a light- hearted book and meant to be enjoyed. By Don not displaying anguish at his differentness it means the reader does not pity him. It makes the reader feel comfortable and safe. Don doesn't stress too much about socially stuffing up, so the reader doesn't stress. We come to love his quirks and resilience. It is stated he has an early history of depression, so that side of social isolation is touched on lightly, without bringing the tone of the book down. Don is also very fortunate to be exceptional at anything he puts his mind to and to be able to change his behavior.


Kristygardiner Angela on the other hand, i just read your comment about your husband striving every day not to make social faux pas. I know exactly what you mean. A person close to me is the same and he is very isolated. Can't hold a job or a relationship. He used to strive to fit in but now he is mostly angry and depressed. It's a difficult life. Maybe someone will write their stories one day but it would be a much more challenging read!


Angela Kristygardiner wrote: "Angela on the other hand, i just read your comment about your husband striving every day not to make social faux pas. I know exactly what you mean. A person close to me is the same and he is very ..."

Thanks Kristy.
Since writing my review I have accepted that Simsion's offering is pure fiction for entertainment and as such is a very good book for general consumption.


Angela Alexandra wrote: "Angela, I appreciated this review. But have to say when I was reading this I didn't feel amy scorn for Don. In fact, i found his comments on "why do people do things this way- this way would be so ..."

Thanks for your comments Alexandra. I agree some of the insights into Don's way of thinking were well placed and accurate. It was interesting you highlighted the skeleton scene. I was uncomfortable reading this as it was such a fabricated scenario , purely for laughs and not like anything I could imagine Don doing. Someone as intelligent as Don would not try and simulate sex with a skeleton...
However, I am coming around to the idea that TRP is a piece of pure fiction for entertainment and not education.


Charlene Angela, Thanks for your review; it has sparked quite a useful and helpful discussion. One of our grandsons is differently-abled, and I have become more aware of peoples' reactions to differences. I was surprised when I read TRP that it is marketed as hysterically funny [my paraphrase]. I tried to read from Don's point of view and I think I learned a lot. Thanks again for your help.


Angela Charlene wrote: "Angela, Thanks for your review; it has sparked quite a useful and helpful discussion. One of our grandsons is differently-abled, and I have become more aware of peoples' reactions to differences. ..."

I am glad my review sparked thought...it was intended to provide some balance and a different perspective.


message 12: by An Odd1 (last edited Oct 06, 2013 10:35PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

An Odd1 Although Don does not cry at movies/ fiction, "my empathy capability was not entirely absent.
3. An inability (or reduced ability) to empathise is not the same as an inability to love." p 312


I felt his pain. The way his pain comes out, in apparent logic and reason, is clear to me, cleverly done. He would not show pain as others might. He so human, so real. Maybe being around family and friends with similar "nerd" "high-functioning Asperger" "skills" has attuned me?

Although the hero has a reverse-Cinderella makeover, showing love does mean willingness and ability to change. Caring can lend confidence. (Personal experience examples - boyfriend went from fear of climbing a tree or apartment balcony to a pilot license, never leaving home-city to months working in other continents.) Most importantly, Don and Rosie both had fun together from the beginning, and did not have to transform. That moral is obvious, no?

I'd forgotten, once upon a time and long ago, before "Asperger" tossed around like breakfast flakes, another book that taught me spice racks do not have to be alphabetical and other life lessons. You might prefer https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6...?


Ethna FICTION: is the form of any work that deals, in part or in whole, with information or events that are not real, but rather, imaginary and theoretical—that is, invented by the author....
CORRECT!


Angela Ethna wrote: "FICTION: is the form of any work that deals, in part or in whole, with information or events that are not real, but rather, imaginary and theoretical—that is, invented by the author....
CORRECT!"


agree.:)


Angela AnUnder wrote: "Although Don does not cry at movies/ fiction, "my empathy capability was not entirely absent.
3. An inability (or reduced ability) to empathise is not the same as an inability to love." p 312

I..."

Thank you for your insights and perspective.


Donna Cook Angela, thank you for providing an important balance to the conversation. While I agree with most the comments on here (I didn't laugh at Don either, loved the way his differences were portrayed as strengths, felt compassion for the pain and depression he endured from "normal" society and their ridiculous demands for conformity) I think reviews like yours help people understand not everyone with Asperger's is going to have the same experience. Or will have the same experience your husband has. We are all unique and deserved to be valued as such, and I think that's what TRP suggests. At least, that's what I got out of it. :)


Angela AnUnder wrote: "Although Don does not cry at movies/ fiction, "my empathy capability was not entirely absent.
3. An inability (or reduced ability) to empathise is not the same as an inability to love." p 312

I..."


Thank you have bookmarked the novel you suggested to read in the future.


message 18: by Ethna (last edited Oct 24, 2013 10:13PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ethna If we can't laugh at ourselves for all our quirks and social inadequacies it would be a sorry world and not one worth living in. Variety is what makes life interesting. I don't meet 'normal' by a long shot nor do I give a damn as age and experience has taught me to let other peoples prejudices go with the wind through my hair. We are none of us 'perfect' so who has any right to judge. Laugh, live, love and ultimately be yourself whoever you are! I'm one who found this book funny on the basis that I can actually relate to Don as I have many of the same traits despite him being a fictional character :-)


Angela Ethna wrote: "If we can't laugh at ourselves for all our quirks and social inadequacies it would be a sorry world and not one worth living in. Variety is wait makes life interesting. I don't meet 'normal' by a..."

Thanks Ethna. In my experience, the 'Dons' I know are not laughing at themselves... Being them is no laughing matter. It does have many positives, some of which were highlighted in this book but it is also trying, confusing, confronting and at times exhausting to negotiate the social world... it is rarely funny to them. Being laughed at does not mean being accepted or respected. Individuals on the spectrum would love to be able to " laugh, live and love" with us , but this is not often their reality.


message 20: by Jess (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jess I was one who rated the book 5 stars, but your review got me thinking. You brought up a lot of good points. I still thoroughly enjoyed the book, but I appreciate your perspective. Your comment about Don's happiness and acceptance coming at the cost of conformity was especially astute. Really good review!


Karen I have just Divorced an Aspie man - for the same reason a lot of women who are non-Aspie do - THEY are lonely - not the Aspie guy. My Husband was incapable of understanding my feeling - and especially cannot understand his own feelings Empathic he most certainly was not. My son has Aspergers too - he fits in in his own lovely way and has some wonderful friends who love him to bits - that does not stop them all laughing with him at his quirks! I am only a little way into this book but I am enjoying it so far. I will report back when I have finished it.


Angela Thanks Karen. How old was your husband when he was diagnosed? I am pleased that your son can laugh with his friends at himself. I hope this will always be the case. Have you read The Journal of Best Practices by David Finch? It is a more realistic look at the tribulations of being in a relationship with an Aspie. I am sure you will be able to relate closely with a lot of it.
I am also sure you will enjoy The Rosie Project.


Angela Karen wrote: "I have just Divorced an Aspie man - for the same reason a lot of women who are non-Aspie do - THEY are lonely - not the Aspie guy. My Husband was incapable of understanding my feeling - and especi..."


message 24: by Holly (new) - added it

Holly I understand your sentiment, Karen, but you are generalizing about folks with this disorder. I have a close family member with this, who lives his life exactly as he sees fit. My guess is that for most folks, these kinds of mental "abnormalities" vary in degree with each individual. Everyone has sadness and loneliness to some degree. And a book of fiction likely isnt going to be a "champion" of any cause, but the author's artwork put in words. Sometimes dealing with serious issues using humor just helps. How many folks out there are going to read a book dealing with sadness and loneliness from a mental illness, unless it has a good story, and some fun along the way? My close family member and I talk about these things. We deal with our ups and downs, and deal with the disease from a position of acceptance, and gratefulness for each moment we have with each other.


message 25: by Nate (new) - rated it 4 stars

Nate Noël We are each entitled to our own opinions. I think it's interesting you talk of stereotypes and generalizations in the book, yet you fully expected Don to share all the sadness he must feel about being on the spectrum. Truth be told, no one can know or assume how he feels. He talks in the book about his lack of empathy..maybe that applies to himself and his past experiences. That he didn't talk about the depressing parts of his life (and we all have them) doesn't mean they didn't exist.. It just wasn't part of the story. He may have already processed those feelings a while ago and simply choses to leave the past where it belongs.


Michael I think the author has written a very funny book about a person with Aspergers and it really made me laugh. For a presumely neurotypical person the author manages to describe the thought patterns of Aspies well....sure it contains a lot of stereotypes, but the book is suppposed to entertain and to be funny too and not describe the difficult part of Aspie life...sure every Aspie is different like every neurotypical person is different, but it's a story not a documentary.


Rose☮️ The book brings a joy to one who is reading it. I found it delightful. Not at all a negative to the subject.


Kelli This book really helped me to understand why my Aspie husband gets so impatient with me (and the world) sometimes. For that I am very grateful. Out has helped me to understand very important parts of his perspective... the pain and anguish stuff, I see enough of at home. 5 stars from me, but I really appreciated your review to remind us that this is all so... complex.


Angela Kelli wrote: "This book really helped me to understand why my Aspie husband gets so impatient with me (and the world) sometimes. For that I am very grateful. Out has helped me to understand very important parts ..."

Thanks Kelly.


message 30: by Spideywebz (new)

Spideywebz Are you on the Autistic Spectrum? I take my oddities and allow them to be a part of me. Not only do I accept it, but I don't want to be "cured". And yes, I do laugh at myself - why shouldn't I?


Angela Thanks Gemma. No I am not on the spectrum but my adult son is. I agree it is important to be able to laugh at our own foibles, whether you are on the spectrum or otherwise.


message 32: by Angela (last edited Jul 10, 2014 03:53PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angela P.S I don't want my son to be cured either... I just want for him to be accepted and included ,warts and all.


Alice I saw Simsion speak a few weeks back (he was delightful!) and the character of Don reflects one of his closest friends. Some of the smaller bits, such as the apricot ice cream and Don's defense of his jacket, are taken almost directly from his friend's life. Simsion's friend has read and adores the book, and apparently has proudly proclaimed to people that he has seen reading the book that the character of Don Tillman was based on him. Simsion also gave copies of the book before the final publishing to his local Asperger's support chapter to make certain that they felt his portrayal was respectful, genuine, and kind.


message 34: by Angela (last edited Jul 17, 2014 04:19PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angela I too saw an interview with Simsion early in 2013 when he was first promoting his novel. He mentioned his friend who inspired the Don character but at that time he said that he was not on the spectrum. He also mentioned that his research into Asperger's was limited and that he used his experiences with individuals in his IT workplace who he assumed would have been on the spectrum for some of his characterisations. I make no judgments about Simsion as a person, nor do I devalue his first novel as an engaging romantic comedy. I did ,however, when reading TRP over 18 months ago now, find it difficult to laugh at Don when he was the pawn in scenes that were purely contrived to garner laughs. I kept asking myself, would Dom what me to be laughing at him in this situation? Would he be laughing at himself? I realise I am too close to this topic and along with my son (who has Asperger's and has read the book, and did not identify with the humour) for me, it is pure fiction and I still wish that Simsion had not connected his loveable character with ASD. In reality, there is much to celebrate about being on the spectrum (we neurotypicals could learn a lot about humility, honesty and goodwill), but laughing about it and what it brings on a day to day basis has not been our experience of it. In reality, it's not that funny.


message 35: by Pep (new) - rated it 4 stars

Pep Thanks to Simsion for writing this wonderful book, personally I hope he continues in the same vein, surely we could all do with more laughter in our lives? i never once felt i was laughing AT Don, simply at how contrived "normal" society has become and the endless hoop jumping that we put ourselves through. Be true to yourself and have faith in Don.Graeme, don't change a thing.


Profiterole I agree with your comment wholeheartedly. I also live with a "Don" (or very mild Sheldon...) and regret that this book, going for laughs, does not delve more into the real challenges faced by those "weirdos" on the autism spectrum. Let me recommend to you the newly published Slightly out of Tune which does a wonderful job at conveying the message that "social awkwardness is not a crime".


Angela Thank you. I will definitely get a copy.


message 38: by Melissa (last edited Aug 21, 2015 10:11AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Melissa I feel like the book took us into Don's world and into a world many of us can relate to at some level! I never found myself laughing AT Don, I was laughing out of familiarity with his thoughts and situation. I know several Aspies, and love the unique perspective they bring to every situation. Most “normal” people suffer needlessly due the ongoing desire to please others and fit in, not just people who are clinically “different”. It was nice that an Aspie was allowed to be celebrated for his strengths, as all people should be, not pitied. I don't think we should feel sorry for people who are different, but rather celebrate their strengths as the author has done here. I also don't see that Don changed who he was to find love in the end – I would take that complaint to Disney! As he repeatedly noted, he merely modified habits and behaviors to be more accommodating to people “who aren't like him” - a lesson on tolerance that we can all learn from.


message 39: by Angela (last edited Dec 22, 2014 01:55PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angela Thanks Melissa. I think you have refined the point I was trying to make and reminded me that at the time of writing the review (some 18 months ago now) I had failed to recognise that TRP is a piece of comical fiction. This novel is written from the perspective of a fictitious non- autistic person (by a neurotypical author) looking in, rather than an authentic Aspie looking out. This explains the novel's massive appeal to a broader audience having been purposefully constructed to amuse and eventually translate into a screenplay. It was written to make us laugh! And it succeeded, with millions of people all around the world laughing at the antics of Don Tillman.
Initially I took offence and bemoaned Simsion's missed opportunity to do something more and really special with the Autistic voice, hence my review. Over, time however my feelings have mellowed and I have accepted this novel for what it is and have no further expectations on its role for improving the understanding or acceptance of people on the spectrum. In fact, a positive outcome has been the debate and discussion promoted by reviews such as mine and others and so on some level I am grateful to this book.
I still wish that Autism had not been linked, however indirectly, with the character of Don,. It would have been more believable and no less entertaining.
Most Aspie people 'suffer needlessly' due to the ongoing inability to fit in and such gross stereotyping as is depicted in this book is not that helpful for their cause. My son who is an amazing young man, capable, productive and a truly beautiful soul endeavours every day to be a part of the social world that can reject or ignore him. Every day , he does his best to 'modify and accommodate' ...to fit in. He shuns both the stereotype and the expectation to behave as the fictitious autistic people portrayed. He wishes that people could understand that he is not WEIRD but just WIRED differently and believes that he should be afforded,as the majority of us are, the ability and acceptance to be himself provided he behaves in a benevolent and safe manner. TRP now has added a cute fuzzy nutty professor as the poster boy for Asperger's, and new expectations for individuals like my son to have to live up to. Most 'Aspies' cannot, despite endeavour, shed their autistic traits and behaviours as Don was able to do towards the end of the book. My son will always have autism and behave in ways that set him up for scrutiny and ridicule.
The only time we laugh at his quirkiness is when we laugh with him, when he finds something funny about his own behaviour; because we know and see when others laugh or mock him how crushed he is and that they are only seeing the stereotype and thinking he is just another Sheldon Cooper or now, Don Tilman, whom they have been given licence to laugh at.
If Don and his loved ones could see those watching and laughing at the many 'scenes' he finds himself in during the book, they would not be laughing with the onlookers....If I was Don's mother, I would be crying. But, here is the thing, I live in the real world of autism, on a day to day basis. And despite my son being the shining light of my life, a young man whom I admire more than any living person I know, I have to say that being on the Autistic spectrum is just not that funny! It is many, many wonderful things... just not that funny!


Profiterole Well said, Angela. That is why I suggest you read Slightly Out of Tune by Idir Aitsahalia, because it feels as if it is written from the inside out and shows the not-so-funny daily trials and tribulations of being an Aspie, even a highly successful one like the main character Jason. Yet there is a lot of levity and funny moments in the book too, as well as hope that the autism spectrum characteristics can be channeled into a productive life --and that an understanding partner may come along on the way.


Angela Thanks for your comment. I will endeavour to get my hands on Slightly Out Of Tune ... I look forward to reading it.


message 42: by Zsuzsanna (new) - added it

Zsuzsanna Halász I also have someone close to me with this disorder. He hates when anybody try to put a label on him. He learned to live with who he is and it is not him who has problems with his behavior. It's us around him !
The other point which I'm missing is the question of personality. Aspis have some familiar problems with social interactions , but they have very different personalities like anybody ! One can laugh on himself the other not.


Angela Zsuzsanna wrote: "I also have someone close to me with this disorder. He hates when anybody try to put a label on him. He learned to live with who he is and it is not him who has problems with his behavior. It's us ..."

Thanks Zsuzsanna, you make a very good point about individual personality.


Kayla I have not been officially diagnosed yet. I have an appointment this month to get the official word, but I also appreciated the research that the author did to have such a close look into thoughts and feelings that are so similar to my own. I even looked at Simsion's website to see if he happened to have Asperger's Syndrome, because so much of his writing spoke to me. There were even a couple of times that I had to pause the audio book because something that had happened get very real with me.


Kayla I also do not see "conforming" as a bad thing. I have worked so hard for so many years to get to the point where people know tell me, "You don't seem like you would have Apserger's," and I applaud all of the years, hours, and anxieties that have gotten me to where I am now.


Angela Thanks Kayla. It sounds like you have learnt a lot about yourself over the years and that you connected with the novel. I would like to know whether you were 'laughing out loud' at Don?( as many readers have said they did) Or, I wonder, were not laughing but empathising with him ? Regardless, I do understand that each person's experience of Aspergers is very different and my perspectives have been influenced by my role as a mother of an Aspie child whom I have watched from infancy to adulthood. Take care.


Grant Please lighten up Angela. He raised my awareness and empathy level for the people with autism spectrum conditions. As did Boston Legal. The brilliance of different aspects of the brain of sufferers is incredible, and I think a great advantage. This is truly a story of self discovery for Don, and we all get to see him work through it, with reasonable, logical methods and very good results. So where is the squandered opportunity? To say what?


message 48: by Angela (last edited Jan 14, 2015 03:09PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angela Thanks Grant. I wrote this review almost 2 years ago and though it remains as relevant from my perspective as at the time of writing it, I understand that there are many as valid perspectives on what this novel has brought to the table when it comes to Aspergers awareness. Boston Legal's Jerry Epenson is the characterisation I most love and admire. My emotions ran very high when I watched the scenarios Jerry negotiated in his day to day life. The writers depicted his struggles with respect, pathos and above all realism. Compare and contrast Jerry's desire to connect on an intimate level; he chose a blow-up -doll to 'talk to' and then to experience physical intimacy from a (living) professional sexual surrogate and counsellor. Don, on the other hand, was placed to simulate sex with a skeleton. One scene illuminated for the audience the deeper difficulties and desires of the individual the other was implausible and constructed for the purpose of garnering laughs... someone as smart as Don would not choose a skeleton to 'practice' on.
I sincerely would like to thank you for reminding me about Jerry...it inspired me to go to the 'tribute to Jerry Espenson' you tube clip which made me smile with admiration and cry for his pain all over again. It also reacquainted me with Katie Lloyd, Jerry's final love interest who truly understood, admired and above all respected Jerry in every way. She is my champion!... in my mind, she and Alan Shore are tied first place getters for the best characters in a show where most could be given the prize. I would be more than happy for Jerry to be the poster boy for Aspergians, not so Don who,due to the popularity of the book, now is!
Had Don Tilman been cast in a more sensitive , respectful and faithful way, my impression of this character and the author may have been more positive. Regardless, I accept that many, including you Grant, did take from TRP some positive and meaningful messages and I am happy for that.
Again thank you for reminding me about Jerry... I will be pulling out the last series Boston Legal DVD's tonight.


Grant Love Boston Legal. and the Flamingoes and sleepovers, the guns and sexism--all to fabulous writing and legal perspectives on current topics. I started watching it about three years ago-I had Netflix and a respected friend said he loved the show. So I watched every episode from the very first season all the way to the end. I still miss that show!


Mdsimms There are more than enough "awareness" books and studies written, and not nearly enough humour. Excellent book.


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