Stephen Hayes's Reviews > The Secret Of Killimooin

The Secret Of Killimooin by Enid Blyton
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May 30, 2009

really liked it
bookshelves: fiction-general, our-books
Read 3 times. Last read July 3, 2017 to July 4, 2017.

There are some children's books that adults enjoy as much as, or even more than children do. But Enid Blyton's books are not among them. I've just finished reading The Enid Blyton story, which examines her life and work, and it also makes this point. Most children love her books, and most adults don't. So I thought I'd re-read a couple of books by Enid Blyton to refresh my memory.

This one is the first Enid Blyton book I ever read, at the age of about 8 or 9 or so, and I've always thought it was one of her best, though when reading it again as an adult it looks somewhat different. One of the first things that one notices about many Enid Blyton books is what is nowadays called "food porn". She goes into ecstatic descriptions of food. But then so does C.S. Lewis in Prince Caspian and in some of the other Narnia books. But Lewis is usually making a point about feasts being associated with celebration and community. In his descriptions of feasts there is usually some element of that, so that most of them have overtones of a Messianic banquet. In Blyton there is less of that. It is more food for the same of food.

Many books of advice to would-be authors of children's books say that one should not "write down" to children. But Enid Blyton does "write down" to children. In The Secret of Killimooin almost every second sentence ends with an exclamation mark. She writes in exclamations: "...he had a surprise that was most unexpected!" Adults tend to notice such redundancies and to be rather annoyed by them, but children don't.

In her dialogues Blyton even sometimes makes characters speak in exclamations, which real children rarely do -- Oh, I say!... What a marvellous surprise!... golly, it will be grand! -- yet real children also don't seem to notice it much.

Yet I also have some vague and rather disturbing memories --that when I was younger and read a lot of these books I thought that perhaps I ought to speak like that, because that was the way proper children spoke, especially those who were destined to have adventures. Or is that just "false memory syndrome"? Or perhaps another grey moment.

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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
Started Reading
January 1, 1950 – Finished Reading
May 30, 2009 – Shelved
June 26, 2009 – Shelved as: fiction-general
June 26, 2009 – Shelved as: our-books
July 3, 2017 – Started Reading
July 4, 2017 – Finished Reading

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