Julie Davis's Reviews > Little Dorrit

Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens
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Dec 26, 2012

it was amazing
bookshelves: i-m-listening, review-books-to-read
Read from August 11, 2013 to August 12, 2016

Listening to Anton Lesser's superb narration, courtesy of review audiobook via SFFaudio.com.

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Casting around for something to listen to but in a weird frame of mind ... I began trying out books read by some of my favorite LibriVox readers, as well as those recommended in the comments. Then I got to Mil Nicholson who reads Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens. I have been longing to read it for some time.

And I fell in love. Her reading is simply superb. It also is wonderfully supplemented by my reading the print copy. This allows for a slow, rich reading, which is not my usual style at all but which I am enjoying very much.

I also love rediscovering all the things I love about Charles Dickens, especially the way he slips bits of humor into his writing. Its funny because its true.
He had a certain air of being a handsome man--which he was not; and a certain air of being a well-bred man--which he was not. It was mere swagger and challenge; but in this particular, as in many others, blustering assertion goes for proof, half over the world.
I also want to mention that I have become a fan of Modern Library publishers. Their books are inexpensive but nicely flexible to stay open at the page I'm reading. The typesize is pleasing. And so forth.

FINAL
Having just finished the book I find that I have been associating it with Middlemarch more than with Dickens' other books. Perhaps that is because Little Dorrit adds a gentle touch of domesticity wherever she goes. More likely it is because it is hard to pigeonhole Dickens from one book to the next. What a genius. I am so happy that I have so many of his books yet to read as shiny, "new" discoveries.
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Reading Progress

08/13/2013 marked as: currently-reading
08/20/2013 page 112
11.0% "Circumlocution Bureau meet Chancery Court. Chancery Court meet Circumlocution Bureau. Everyone shake hands, have a glass of sherry and shake your heads over those poor dolts stuck in the Marshalsea debtor's prison."
09/07/2013 page 330
37.0% "I so love Maggy. When in the middle of a fairy tale she inserts questions about her favorite place on earth (which I will not give further details about so I don't ruin it for anyone), it not only makes me love her more but also makes me laugh. Dickens, you story master you! I'm not sure how it is possible, but thus far I like this even better than Bleak House."
09/13/2013 page 470
53.0% "I don't even know what page I'm on because I'm listening to the audio right now ... but I am so very upset at Mrs. General's idiocy (I get that I'm not the only one ... there's a reason all those previous employers were so anxious to send her to her next job) in her understanding of Fanny's and Little Dorrit's personalities. So. Very. Upset. The amount of angst I'm feeling is just proof of Dicken's genius."
09/13/2013 page 470
53.0% "I don't even know what page I'm on ... but I am so very upset at Mrs. General's idiocy (I get that I'm not the only one ... there's a reason all those previous employers were so anxious to send her to her next job), especially in her (mis)understanding of Fanny's and Little Dorrit's personalities. So. Very. Upset. Though I now love LD's uncle more than ever. The angst I'm feeling is just proof of Dicken's genius."
09/18/2013 page 470
53.0% "Again, listening so have no idea of what page count is ... BUT in book 2, chapter 8 ... I just fell officially more in love with Mr. Meagles than ever I was before. GO! VANQUISH Mrs. Gowan! Woohoo!!!"
09/28/2013 page 676
77.0% "I've now picked up my print copy since the audio version, though I love it, is too slow. Charles Dickens rewarded me by sending my thoughts down one road only to twist the plot suddenly in an unexpected direction (love it when he does that) ... and leave me in a poignant state of mind. What a master story teller."
09/28/2013 page 676
77.0% "I've now picked up my print copy since the audio version, though I love it, is too slow. Charles Dickens rewarded me by sending my thoughts down one road only to twist the plot suddenly in an unexpected direction (love it when he does that) ... and leave me in a poignant state of mind, reflecting upon the prisons we build for ourselves and how it needs courage to set ourselves free. What a master story teller."
09/30/2013 page 800
91.0% "Well, thank goodness for young John Chivery who had the nerve to say to Arthur Clenham, "Don't you know who loves you?" I love that young man and the way we can see his internal progress by the tombstone inscription he pictures for himself when he's in bed at night ... as a summary of his life's accomplishments."
10/01/2013 marked as: read
07/09/2016 marked as: currently-reading
07/13/2016 page 1
0.0% "Listening gives one room to ruminate on bigger themes ... at least it does for me in this book. I feel as if we'd have structured our welfare system differently if our political leaders in the 1960s had been forced to consider the lessons of Little Dorrit. Human nature hasn't changed since then."
08/12/2016 marked as: read
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Comments (showing 1-11 of 11) (11 new)

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message 1: by Fonch (new) - added it

Fonch I have to read the little Dorrit i try to include in my list of books that i have to read.


booklady His subtle (and usually unexpected) insertions of humor are one of the reasons I love Dickens too.


Julie Davis booklady wrote: "His subtle (and usually unexpected) insertions of humor are one of the reasons I love Dickens too."

You've hit the nail on the head. There will be a big dramatic build up and suddenly, a one or two line description that cracks me up. It is so very funny, so very true (which is why it is funny), and so very wonderful.


message 4: by Fonch (new) - added it

Fonch Well my Dicken`s favorite novel is History of Two cities, the favorite novel of my father is David Coperfield. I agree totally with you (Mrs Julie) and with booklady. It is a pity that i could not finish my reading of Bleak House but perhaps one day i will try to read again.
Dickens it was of the most favorite Chesterton`s writer.


Julie Davis A Tale of Two Cities is the novel that began me reading Dickens. I got it from LibriVox and listened to it at work while I was doing some boring layout that needed no thinking. When I got done, I burst into tears at my desk ... what a powerful book that is!

I loved Bleak House because it is so very modern in the way it is told, it combines so many genres in one (horror, mystery, love story, etc.), and it is simply a great story.

The jury is still out on Little Dorrit. We shall see.. :-)


message 6: by Fonch (new) - added it

Fonch Yes everybody said that Bleak House is a good novel including Chesterton, but i try to read in two ocassions and i have failed i will have to try again, perhaps i was the problem :-(.
I totally agree respected A tale of two cities, i like so much also Great Expectations although my father does not like this novel.


Julie Davis Great Expectations is a novel I have tried several times to read and always failed at. Perhaps when Mil Nicholson at LibriVox does her recording then I can make it all the way through. :-)


message 8: by Fonch (new) - added it

Fonch I remembered to my father did not like Great Expectations in my case i really like these novel.


message 9: by Fredösphere (new)

Fredösphere Julie, next time you're looking for something to read while in a weird frame of mind, please have a look at my first novel The Devil's Dictum. It's . . . weird.


Julie Davis Fredösphere wrote: "Julie, next time you're looking for something to read while in a weird frame of mind, please have a look at my first novel The Devil's Dictum. It's . . . weird."

You know, I remember Scott Danielson and Jeff Miller really liked it. I am not sure how it slipped off my radar. Thank you for slipping it back on!


message 11: by Fredösphere (new)

Fredösphere Julie wrote: "Thank you for slipping it back on!"
You're welcome! It was written for readers like you.


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