Sarah's Reviews > Prophecy: Child of Earth

Prophecy by Elizabeth Haydon
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Feb 25, 2009

it was ok
bookshelves: 2009, fantasy
Read in February, 2009

Blergh. You guys, I can't read high fantasy anymore. I don't know whether I've grown as a reader or I've just read too much, but high fantasy just seems really tired to me. And this particular book was a total Mary Sue fest. I probably would have enjoyed it more if Achmed was the main character and Rhapsody had disappeared from the story completely, though then we wouldn't have had Ashe, who I really enjoy.

A big irritation for me was the way the author uses twenty-five dollar words. She misuses them, but you can still see what she’s aiming for. It was really irritating, because she used them in the sense of the meaning of the word, but it’s far enough outside the word’s general use that it detracts from the flow of the writing. It’s like I used “sky blue” to describe what color the sky is at night. I mean, it’s the sky, so the color blue it is is arguably sky blue, except it’s definitely not light blue. Unfortunately, I've already returned it to the library, so I can't give any specific examples.
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07/19/2016 marked as: read

Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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message 1: by Julie (new)

Julie I don't know if I'd base anything on this particular series. I read 1/3 of the way through the first book and simply despised it and I love epic/high fantasy. They were trudging around inside the earth I think. Just dreadful, and the character of Rhapsody made me want to strangle myself.


Sarah I'm not really basing that thought so much on this book as I am on the last few fantasy novels I've read. I used to devour this stuff, and now I can just barely tolerate it. I'm not sure what it is. I could probably write for a couple pages and come up with reasons, but I'll spare you that.

I have a friend who really wants me to read A Song of Fire and Ice series, and I just can't make it through. I absolutely trust her judgment on books, and I just can't make it work for the high fantasy. It's kind of disappointing.

Just dreadful, and the character of Rhapsody made me want to strangle myself.

Oh my goodness, yes! Simply wretched. Though I wanted to strangle her, not myself.


message 3: by Julie (new)

Julie I tend to be such a streaky reader that I'll abandon a genre for a while then come back then abandon then come back. Some, though, I've never returned to. I don't read romances any longer despite loving them as a teen.

Fantasy seems like such a hit-or-miss genre for me. The great is great and the bad is egregious.


Sarah I really abandoned high fantasy after high school, because I just had too much reading to do for school. I also seem to remember thinking that women in fantasy tend to be really poorly represented, which disappointed me a lot. It seems like they're damsels in distress, total bitches, or Mary Sues. I really couldn't find any women to respect in fantasy literature, and women's roles in literature was something that was becoming very important to me.

I don't even know how to rationalize that with the number of really bad romance novels I've read.

Fantasy seems like such a hit-or-miss genre for me. The great is great and the bad is egregious.

This is very true. I tend to find authors that I like, and then I wear their writing out. I read it too much and I get tired of them. Like too much chocolate.



message 5: by Julie (new)

Julie One of my favorite female characters in fantasy is Ista, the heroine of Lois McMaster Bujold's Paladin of Souls. It's the second book in her Chalion trilogy, and one of the best fantasy novels I've ever read.

I very much agree that high fantasy has some serious gender issues. Urban fantasy has a lot of girls kicking butt and taking names, but the same cannot be said of the more traditional fare.


Sarah I do like Bujold a lot! And Marion Zimmer Bradley. The Darkover books.

Urban fantasy has a lot of girls kicking butt and taking names, but the same cannot be said of the more traditional fare.

My problem with urban fantasy is that a lot of the heroines are bitches, to the point where it's become a tenet of the genre. Can we have some characters who have actual causation for their bitchiness, rather than just hating everyone?


message 7: by Julie (new)

Julie *snerk* I know what you mean. I think the Mercy Thompson series is the best that I've read for having a main character who is who she is for reasons that are given in the book, but she also isn't a bitch (or at least she doesn't strike me that way).


The UHQ Nasanta Julie, I totally feel the same way. I've felt this way about fantasy for about 5 years now. During that time, I mostly read romance with the occasional fantasy. I think that's why I will read the Rhapsody books mainly for the love interest line. I've read the first 2.5 books (didn't finish 3rd) in A Song of Fire and Ice series. It was pretty good but I was already informed that the author had no problems killing off characters, and even then I tended to avoid "sad" books. Maybe in 5 years I will finish them, but it's on hold for me indefinitely for now.


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