Cameron's Reviews > Code Talker: A Novel About the Navajo Marines of World War Two

Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
U 50x66
's review


The "Code Talker" is a book about Navajo's during World War II. The main character is a Navajo that is fluent in both English and the language of the Navajo's which he calls the sacred or pure language. His younger years are spent at boarding school or on the preservation where the Navajo live in poverty and aren't treated well by other Americans. But after Pearl Harbor he wants to enlist into the Marines and does as soon as it was made possible. To make the code process faster and more effective the Army has the Navajo Marines make a code. They chose Navajo because the language wasn't written it was taught orally and was hard to speak unless the person was trained from when they were young. The main character and his fellow Navajo were important in the communication of World War II Pacific Theater and some were later decorated for it.

My reaction to the book is neither positive or negative i guess it is neutral. I was interested in what i learned from the book about Navajos and how they benefited the U.S. in WWII. After reading the "Code Talker" I have a new respect for the Navajo despite being mistreated they still wanted to fight for their homeland and had a big part in winning the war. The book sometimes seemed to have spots where it would get pretty boring or lose my interest.

Along with my reaction I believe I would be neutral in recommending the book. It all depends on what you like to read. I would recommend the book only to those who are interested in war facts or someone who is interested in history. I would not recommend it to anyone who likes action books because the author doesn't write about the battle field experiences to create suspense. It is written more to inform rather than to entertain
2 likes · flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Code Talker.
Sign In »

Reading Progress

Finished Reading
December 9, 2012 – Shelved

No comments have been added yet.