Amy's Reviews > Paint Chips

Paint Chips by Susie Finkbeiner
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it was amazing

Those of us who write often read what others have written and think, "Man! I wish I had written that!" This little novel is filled with sentences I wished I had written. The novel is basically about three women who have suffered through the terrors of human trafficking - Cora, Dot (Cora's daughter), and Lola. It is about their struggles to see past the damage of their lives and into the beauty that God intended for them. Sprinkled with humor, sadness, compassion and love, the author wrestles with the questions we all try to pin down: why do bad things happen to good people? If God is so good, why does He allow evil to exist? And how does my own free will play into this?

Each of the heroines desires to "paint over" their pasts. Instead, God helps them to clear away the paint chips - sometimes getting stuck painfully beneath their fingernails - in order to see the beauty underneath. At one point, Cora says of her friend Lisa, "Something within me needed to know that she understood what it meant to suffer." This resonated with me, and brought to my mind that Jesus does, indeed, understand suffering. Did He not suffer unto death, even death on a cross? And the author reminds us that, in the midst of all of our suffering, our God is there with us, suffering with us, bringing help to us even if we can't recognize it.

This novel is filled with strong characters, strong themes, and even humor. And the tension was exquisite! If your complaint is that the ending is too "pretty," too "perfect," consider what the author says: God loves happy endings. If you must, blame the genre - Christian fiction almost demands those happy endings. If you can, understand the author - being a woman of great faith herself, she has SEEN miracles and knows that of which she speaks.

Read this book and be blessed.
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Reading Progress

December 6, 2012 – Shelved
January 13, 2013 – Started Reading
January 13, 2013 – Finished Reading

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