Chad Schimke's Reviews > Frankenstein

Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
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Sep 28, 2012

it was amazing
bookshelves: horror

FRANKENSTEIN - This horror story has elements of mystery, supernatural, a gloomy setting and a character that bridges the worlds of the living and undead. The result is arguably the most identified classic gothic novel. The genesis of Frankenstein came to Mary Shelley in a dream. She was a part of a group visiting Lord Byron (poet of the romantic movement) confined to a villa remaining indoors due to incessant rain. He issued the famous challenge to write a horror story, which ultimately led to Frankenstein and John Polidori writing The Vampyre. Percy Bysshe Shelley was in the villa also, a prominent romantic poet in his own right, as well as Mary’s husband. I am particularly fond of the 1931 film version starring Boris Karloff. Don’t be put off by the movie era or black and white format. This was a pre-code film that didn’t flinch from controversial content. The pace is quick, black/ white reinforces the tone, utilizes stark visual imagery and pioneering movie effects/ sets. This is a classic Universal Pictures monster flick in an era where no other studio could have done it better. Not to be missed!
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Holly Foley (Procida) I should def see the movie soon, (only saw later versions) The book and the movie I saw were wildly different, and made me surprised at how "un- powerful" the writing seemed.. maybe the visuals are key to this concept ?


message 2: by Jay (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jay Holly wrote: "I should def see the movie soon, (only saw later versions) The book and the movie I saw were wildly different, and made me surprised at how "un- powerful" the writing seemed.. maybe the visuals ar..."

It's definitely worth watching. I want to get a new copy on Bluray.

The version that's closest to the book is "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." It was directed by Kenneth Braunagh who also stars as the doctor, and Robert de Niro is the "Modern Prometheus."


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