Corvinus Maximilus's Reviews > Sexing the Cherry

Sexing the Cherry by Jeanette Winterson
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Aug 26, 2012

it was amazing
bookshelves: brilliant
Recommended for: Linda Were
Read from September 07 to 16, 2012

Absolutely brilliant! I believe I have highlighted the entire book, beautifully written. Lots of meaningful words and thoughts on life and the journeys we take. I thought it would be a hard read, but she writes so beautifully she took me a lovely trip through time and space. I can't praise this book enough. I am glad I read it, I really am.
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Quotes Corvinus Liked

Jeanette Winterson
“The Buddhists say there are 149 ways to God. I'm not looking for God, only for myself, and that is far more complicated. God has had a great deal written about Him; nothing has been written about me. God is bigger, like my mother, easier to find, even in the dark. I could be anywhere, and since I can't describe myself I can't ask for help.”
Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry
tags: god, life

Jeanette Winterson
“As your lover describes you, so you are.”
Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry

Jeanette Winterson
“the buddhists say there are 149 ways to god. i'm not looking for god, only for myself, and that is far more complicated.”
Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry

Jeanette Winterson
“I fell in love once, if love be that cruelty which takes us straight to the gates of Paradise only to remind us they are closed for ever.”
Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry

Jeanette Winterson
“When my husband had an affair with someone else I watched his eyes glaze over when we ate dinner together and I heard him singing to himself without me, and when he tended the garden it was not for me.

He was courteous and polite; he enjoyed being at home, but in the fantasy of his home I was not the one who sat opposite him and laughed at his jokes. He didn't want to change anything; he liked his life. The only thing he wanted to change was me.

It would have been better if he had hated me, or if he had abused me, or if he had packed his new suitcases and left.

As it was he continued to put his arm round me and talk about being a new wall to replace the rotten fence that divided our garden from his vegetable patch. I knew he would never leave our house. He had worked for it.

Day by day I felt myself disappearing. For my husband I was no longer a reality, I was one of the things around him. I was the fence which needed to be replaced. I watched myself in the mirror and saw that I was mo longer vivid and exciting. I was worn and gray like an old sweater you can't throw out but won't put on.

He admitted he was in love with her, but he said he loved me.

Translated, that means, I want everything. Translated, that means, I don't want to hurt you yet. Translated, that means, I don't know what to do, give me time.

Why, why should I give you time? What time are you giving me? I am in a cell waiting to be called for execution.

I loved him and I was in love with him. I didn't use language to make a war-zone of my heart.

'You're so simple and good,' he said, brushing the hair from my face.

He meant, Your emotions are not complex like mine. My dilemma is poetic.

But there was no dilemma. He no longer wanted me, but he wanted our life

Eventually, when he had been away with her for a few days and returned restless and conciliatory, I decided not to wait in my cell any longer. I went to where he was sleeping in another room and I asked him to leave. Very patiently he asked me to remember that the house was his home, that he couldn't be expected to make himself homeless because he was in love.

'Medea did,' I said, 'and Romeo and Juliet and Cressida, and Ruth in the Bible.'

He asked me to shut up. He wasn't a hero.

'Then why should I be a heroine?'

He didn't answer, he plucked at the blanket.

I considered my choices.

I could stay and be unhappy and humiliated.

I could leave and be unhappy and dignified.

I could Beg him to touch me again.

I could live in hope and die of bitterness.

I took some things and left. It wasn't easy, it was my home too.

I hear he's replaced the back fence.”
Jeanette Winterson, Sexing the Cherry
tags: love


Reading Progress

09/07/2012 page 56
33.0% "Tis a strange book for certain!"
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