Bastard Travel's Reviews > Pathways to Bliss: Mythology and Personal Transformation

Pathways to Bliss by Joseph Campbell
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Joseph Campbell's work is always best consumed through audiobook. He's a dry writer. Unfortunately, he's an even drier speaker, as career academics usually are, so you've really gotta hunt for the audiobooks where they hired professional narrators to read it, instead of the recordings of his university lectures that they try to pass off as books.

The ideas contained in the work are gold, especially if you're a Jungian or some other kind of witch. Human beings think in terms of the mythological. These archetypes help us understand aspects of ourselves, and we call on them the way that voodoo practitioners let the loa ride them, or how ancient Greeks invoked the protection of situational gods, color-coded for easy reference

The main idea of pathway to bliss is We Live in a Society and we lost the plot, which is why we have such a hard time figuring out what makes us happy. The first step is initiation, the transformation from the comfort and protection of childhood to suddenly having all the responsibility of adulthood thrust on us. In many cultures, this is a highly ritualized process. In American culture, it's not, which is why there are so many cringy "adulting" jokes. Women get menstruation, which serves as a pretty undeniable threshold, but men just kind of stumble along and eventually segue into what their interpretation of proper adulthood and conduct is.

The other function of initiation is to unite the mentalities of the tribe with regard to what the values of the tribe are, and to provide a clear, concise set of rules for the aspiring initiated to follow and uphold. A code. We don't have a code anymore. Instead, we have a selection of half-ass codes that we spend all our time arguing about, because as mythologically-minded creatures, we want the meaning and purpose provided by a unanimous code.

There's a vague blueprint, though. You graduate. You get a job. You marry. You produce 2.3 offspring. You provide for them. You keep all those plates spinning until the kids grow up and launch along their own ill-defined trajectories, and then you retire, and then...

And then?

Campbell talks about how it's at that point you're free to pursue your bliss, even though time has almost run out. You spend your whole life working toward the golden years where you'll finally be able to fish in peace, and once you've squared away the rest of your requirements and you have your lifetime boxed up nice and tidy, you get in your little boat and row out. And sometimes, after a week, you realize that fishing is boring, and holy shit, I wasted my entire life.

There is no formalized initiation. There is no clearly defined rule set. We have interpretations of the expectations foisted on us, but interpretations are all they are, since our culture is without a true moral compass. The main message of the book is that we don't need to put our bliss off until we're almost dead. In fact, it's the worst move we can make. Our lives belong to us foremost, and we contain all the archetypes, and maybe some would resonate with us better than others if we gave ourselves the chance to explore those sides of ourselves.

Maybe you weren't meant to be a fisherman. You thought you were, but you waited and scrimped and saved for 50 years, and now you're out there, and fishing is boring. Maybe your true passion is base jumping. Well, you're 70, so you're not going to go base jumping. Not more than once, anyway. It's tragic to deny yourself the best life you could have had, and the best you that you could have been, because instead of pursuing some ridiculous bliss dream off the beaten path, you followed what you thought was expected of you -- but which was never really expected of you in the first place!

Go on out there, chase your bliss. The Gonzo kids would say "Let your freak flag fly". Do that, if it makes you feel better. It's your life. You're the protagonist of the story, and I think that the real and deep-down origin of neuroticism is the cognitive dissonance that comes from knowing yourself to be the hero of your personal mythology while observing yourself constantly acting unheroic.
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Reading Progress

February 8, 2021 – Started Reading
February 8, 2021 – Shelved
February 11, 2021 – Finished Reading

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