Anna Luce's Reviews > The Yellow Wallpaper

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
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bookshelves: novellas-and-short-stories, 4-favourites, 2020-reviews, poignant-reads

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“But in the places where it isn't faded and where the sun is just so—I can see a strange, provoking, formless sort of figure, that seems to skulk about behind that silly and conspicuous front design.”


First published in 1892 The Yellow Wallpaper is a disquieting short story that has become a seminal piece of feminist literature. Charlotte Perkins Gilman presents her readers with a brief yet evocative narrative that will likely disturb even the most hardened of readers. What struck me the most about this story is that it does not read like something written at the close of the 19th century. Perhaps this is due to the way this story is presented to us. There is an urgency to the unmanned woman's journal entries that comprise this story, her later entries in particular seem to have been written in haste and secrecy.
John, the husband of our protagonist, is a physician who insists his wife ought to rest in order to recuperate from the classic female illness which consists in “temporary nervous depression” and “a slight hysterical tendency”. John, alongside his sister and other doctors, insist that his wife ought not to overwork or excite herself so he forbids her from writing or performing any chore. He believes that nourishing meals and restorative walks will do wonders for her health. Our narrator however disagrees. Over the summer the couple is residing in a mansion that perturbs her. As the days go by her journal entries express her increasing fixation with her room's yellow wallpaper. When she voices the wish to leave the mansion or to see others her husband insists that they should remain.
John's blindness to his wife's spiralling health exacerbates her illness. Her morbid fixation with her wallpaper leads her to believe that something, or someone, is hiding beneath its pattern.
Gilman's haunting examination of female madness will definitely leave a mark on her readers. The narrative's Gothic and oppressive atmosphere emphasise our protagonist's stultifying existence. Her husband's dismissal of her worries and his firm instance that she merely needs rests and walks outside to recover force her down a self-destructive path.
The journal entries are extremely effective in that they convey their author's deteriorating state of mind. Her descriptions of the wallpaper—from its pattern to its colour and smell—are certainly unnerving as they place us alongside her.
John's 'cure' for his wife is far worse that her malaise as he isolates her from the rest of society, confines her person to a room, and cuts her off from her creative pursuits and hobbies. The protagonist's breakdown is brought about by those who wish to contain and or cure of her more 'alarming' emotions (such as sadness and grief) by locking her away.
If you are interested in reading more about this story or the portrayal of 'female madness' in Victorian literature I really recommend Gilbert and Gubar's The Madwoman in the Attic.
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Reading Progress

November 24, 2020 – Started Reading
November 24, 2020 – Shelved
November 24, 2020 – Shelved as: novellas-and-short-stories
November 24, 2020 – Finished Reading
November 25, 2020 – Shelved as: 4-favourites
November 30, 2020 – Shelved as: 2020-reviews
November 30, 2020 – Shelved as: poignant-reads

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