stephanie suh's Reviews > Brief Lives

Brief Lives by Paul  Johnson
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it was amazing

Biography is an ancient branch of literature that attests to the unchangeability of human nature against the flow of time. In its literary context, the Bible, composed of 66 books, is about the prophets, kings, sinners, let alone Christ and his disciples. Homer's Odyssey and Iliad recite the ancient Greek heroes' honors and foibles during the Trojan War and the aftermath. Plutarch's Lives reveal the naked truth about the ancient Greek and Roman powers-that-be who seem to be no less different than their modern descendants in power. There are no other types of writing that are intuitively intriguing than an honest because a good biography gives the reader a sensation of reading a private diary or glimpsing behind-the façade moments of the person that lay bare the real persona of the subject person. In this ancient tradition of biography comes Paul Johnson's Brief Lives of the famous people he has met from all over the world told in episodic vignettes.

The book tells Johnson's reminiscences of historically notable personalities he has met directly and indirectly throughout his long journalistic career. Ernest Hemingway was not a Pooterish famed writer but a down-to-earth bon vivant with a love of wine. John Paul II was a true vicar of Christ gifted to our mad secular world. Princess Diana had incredible intuition, which was of prime kind channeled into high and low people's feelings. However, Pablo Picasso was the artist as rich as Croesus with the matching haughtiness. C.S. Lewis was an excellent lecturer whose populous lecture rooms were also an intellectual version of dating hippodrome. And Richard Nixon, regardless of his Watergate infamy, proved himself to be a diligent scholar of history with the admirable zeal of continuous learning. Johnson is a keen observer of people with a prism through which people's true colors are reflected. It is refreshingly educating to learn about the other, overlooked sides of the infamous and the famous without a gloss of the uniformed panegyrics or accusations, and doing justice to the publicly ill-informed.

It is also interesting to compare the book with Plutarch's Lives in terms of its episodic vignette form of writing, making both books more comfortable to read and stimulating to delve into. Johnson's episodes are vivaciously sprightful and wittily feisty, grasping the reader's attention from page to page with irresistible curiosity. Johnson and Plutarch use the ordinary language about the extraordinary to serve the purpose of writing biographies for the public with the knowledge about humankind that even the powerful and the beautiful are subject to anfractuous ridges that all humans have to climb in life.

I have read several books by Paul Johnson. All of them are packed full of his trademark wits, conservative but not chauvinistic perspectives on morality, and admirable erudition, thrown into a brilliant bonfire of words enjoyable by general readers. Brief Lives is no exception to the rule, showing that Johnson has ways with the words that make them vernacular in his choice of vocabulary he conjures and scholarly of the sentences he alloys. Samuel Johnson defined a good biography should disclose the person's human side to show that no one is perfect, powerful, and beautiful. Brief Lives of people echo the same.
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Reading Progress

May 6, 2020 – Shelved as: to-read (Paperback Edition)
May 6, 2020 – Shelved (Paperback Edition)
November 2, 2020 – Started Reading
November 2, 2020 – Shelved
November 2, 2020 – Finished Reading

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