Aurora Fitzrovia's Reviews > The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There by Catherynne M. Valente
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Leichte Spoiler für Band 1

Once upon a time, a girl named September had a secret.


Und zwar ein ganz besonderes, denn sie war in Fairyland. Und genau dieses Geheimnis macht sie anders als die anderen Kinder, und so wünscht und sehnt sie sich jeden Tag zurück nach Fairyland und zu ihren Freunden.
Doch ein Jahr, nachdem sie Fairyland verlassen hatte, hat sich das Land verändert: Denn die Schatten und die Magie, die Fairyland ausmachen, verschwinden langsam. September, die im ersten Band ihren Schatten "eintauschen" musste, schwant, dass sie nicht ganz unschuldig an der Situation ist.

Ich bin froh, dass ich nicht ganz ein Jahr warten musste wie September, um wieder nach Fairyland zu gelangen und auch hier liebe ich dieses sehr kreative und wunderbare Wunderland wieder. So sehr, dass ich das Gefühl habe, beim ersten Lesen gar nicht alle Besonderheiten und Anspielungen erfassen zu können.
Dieses Mal lernt man hauptsächlich Fairyland-Below und die Funktionen der Schatten kennen, was mich sehr fasziniert hatte. Dadurch erscheint das Buch auch etwas düsterer auf mich, und da September nun ein Jahr älter ist, wirkt auch die Geschichte leicht älter, als wäre sie mit ihr gealtert. Ganz wunderbar gemacht. Aber nicht alles ist dunkel. Neben dem Wiedersehen mit bekannten Gesichtern, gibt es auch eine neue Gefährtin für September, die ich von ihrem ersten Auftritt an sofort in mein Herz schließen musste. Gespickt mit weiteren großartigen Ideen, wie einer Farm, in der Gedichte statt Gemüse wachsen, einem Glaswald und einem Aal, der sich nur durch Tränen vorwärts bewegen kann und noch vielem mehr, und einem wunderbaren Schreibstil, mit tollen Vergleichen und "philosophischen" Anspielungen, weswegen ich am liebsten das ganze Buch zitieren würde, ist auch "The Girl who fell beneath Fairyland and led the Revels there" ein ganz besonders Lesevergnügen, dass ich so schnell nicht vergessen werde. Und bestimmt noch oft durchblättern und -lesen werde.

Wer den ersten Band "The Girl who circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of her own Making" schon mochte, der wird mit dem zweiten Band sicherlich auch viel Spaß haben!
Das einzig Negative: Jetzt geht das Warten auf den nächsten Band los :/
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Quotes Aurora Liked

Catherynne M. Valente
“That's Venus, September thought. She was the goddess of love. It's nice that love comes on first thing in the evening, and goes out last in the morning. Love keeps the light on all night.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“A book is a door, you know. Always and forever. A book is a door into another place and another heart and another world.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Some girls have to go to college to discover what they are good at; some are born doing what they must without even truly knowing why. I felt a hole in my heart shaped like a dark door I needed to guard.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Do you suppose you will look the same when you are an old woman as you do now? Most folk have three faces—the face they get when they’re children, the face they own when they’re grown, and the face they’ve earned when they’re old. But when you live as long as I have, you get many more. I look nothing like I did when I was a wee thing of thirteen. You get the face you build your whole life, with work and loving and grieving and laughing and frowning.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“The smell of loving is a difficult one to describe, but if you think of the times when someone has held you close and made you safe, you will remember how it smells just as well as I do.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Hearts set about finding other hearts the moment they are born, and between them, they weave nets so frightfully strong and tight that you end up bound forever in hopeless knots, even to the shadow of a beast you knew and loved long ago.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“I don’t want to be a Princess,” she said finally. “You can’t make me be one.” She knew very well what became of Princesses, as Princesses often get books written about them. Either terrible things happened to them, such as kidnappings and curses and pricking fingers and getting poisoned and locked up in towers, or else they just waited around till the Prince finished with the story and got around to marrying her. Either way, September wanted nothing to do with Princessing.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“She did not know yet how sometimes people keep parts of themselves hidden and secret, sometimes wicked and unkind parts, but often brave or wild or colorful parts, cunning or powerful or even marvelous, beautiful parts, just locked up away at the bottom of their hearts. They do this because they are afraid of the world and of being stared at, or relied upon to do feats of bravery or boldness. And all of those brave and wild and cunning and marvelous and beautiful parts they hid away and left in the dark to grow strange mushrooms—and yes, sometimes those wicked and unkind parts, too—end up in their shadow.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Shows what you know, sunny-girl! I’m sure you’ve heard people talk about their Heart’s Desire—well that’s a load of rot. Hearts are idiots. They’re big and squishy and full of daft dreams. They flounce off to write poetry and moon at folk who aren’t worth the mooning. Bones are the ones that have to make the journey, fight the monster, kneel before whomever is big on kneeling these days. Bones do the work for the heart’s grand plans. Bones know what you need. Hearts only know want. I much prefer to deal with children, boggans, and villains, who haven’t got hearts to get in the way of the very important magic of Getting-Things-Done.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Children are natural practitioners of the Queer and the Questing, for childhood is nothing but a quest through a queer country. Of course, they often have a good deal of trouble with the Quiet.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“It’s up to you. Everyone should get to choose their own way, and that’s all I mean by yelling. But I shall choose to remember you, and it would be nice if it went both ways. That’s how it generally goes in my country.” But does it? September thought. If a body is hurt, they try to forget the person who hurt them and never think about the pain again. Remembering aches, like when I remember my father. It’d be so much easier to never wonder about him. I’m sure he remembers my face, but it’s hard to remember his, when he’s been gone so long! Perhaps memory is a thing that everyone involved has to work at, like stitching up a big quilt out of everything that ever happened to you.
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“And then she felt her Ell’s great strong presence beside her, and Saturday slipped his hand in hers. Oh. Oh. They would not abandon her. Of course, they would not. How silly she had been. They were her friends—they had always been. Friends can go odd on you and do things you don’t like, but that doesn’t make them strangers.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Once more September marveled that even the Dodo knew what she wanted to be when she was grown. She simply could not think what she herself might do. September expected that destinies, which is how she thought of professions, simply landed upon one like a crown, and ever after no one questioned or fretted over it, being sure of one’s own use in the world. It was only that somehow her crown had not yet appeared. She did hope it would hurry up.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“You know, in Fairyland-Above they said that the underworld was full of devils and dragons. But it isn’t so at all! Folk are just folk, wherever you go, and it’s only a nasty sort of person who thinks a body’s a devil just because they come from another country and have different notions. It’s wild and quick and bold down here, but I like wild things and quick things and bold things, too.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“September had never been betrayed before. She did not even know what to call the feeling in her chest, so bitter and sour. Poor child. There is always a first time, and it is never the last time.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“September did not want to feel for the Marquess. That’s how villains get you, she knew. You feel badly for them, and next thing you know, you’re tied to train tracks. But her wild, untried heart opened up another bloom inside her, a dark branch heavy with fruit.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Cats don’t have dark sides. That’s all a shadow is—and though you might be prejudiced against the dark, you ought to remember that that’s where stars live, and the moon and raccoons and owls and fireflies and mushrooms and cats and enchantments and a rather lot of good, necessary things. Thieving, too, and conspiracies, sneaking, secrets, and desire so strong you might faint dead away with the punch of it. But your light side isn’t a perfectly pretty picture, either, I promise you. You couldn’t dream without the dark. You couldn’t rest. You couldn’t even meet a lover on a balcony by moonlight. And what would the world be worth without that? You need your dark side, because without it, you’re half gone. Cats, on the other hand, have a more sensible setup. We just have the one side, and it’s mostly the sneaking and sleeping side anyway. So the other Iago and I feel very companionable toward each other. Whereas I expect my drowsy mistress Above would loathe this version of herself, who is kind and quiet and lonely and rather dear, all the things the original is not. My love stands for both. This one pets me more; that one let me pounce on anything I wanted.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“You cannot escape where you come from, September. Some part of it remains inside you always, like the slender white heart in the center of the thickest onion.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“I’m a monster,” said the shadow of the Marquess suddenly. “Everyone says so.”

The Minotaur glanced up at her. “So are we all, dear,” said the Minotaur kindly. “The thing to decide is what kind of monster to be. The kind who builds towns or the kind who breaks them.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“This is what comes of having a heart, even a very small and young one. It causes no end of trouble, and that’s the truth.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“Her father’s shadow looked sadly down at her. “You can never forget what you do in a war, September my love. No one can. You won’t forget your war either.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“For there are two kinds of forgiveness in the world: the one you practice because everything really is all right, and what went before is mended. The other kind of forgiveness you practice because someone needs desperately to be forgiven, or because you need just as badly to forgive them, for a heart can grab hold of old wounds and go sour as milk over them.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“For though, as we have said, all children are heartless, this is not precisely true of teenagers. Teenage hearts are raw and new, fast and fierce, and they do not know their own strength. Neither do they know reason or restraint, and if you want to know the truth, a goodly number of grown-up hearts never learn it.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“I can never remember my dreams," said the shadow of the Marquess quietly.

"You must have had rich, tasty ones then. When you can't remember a dream, it's because a Baku ate it.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“And when you speak of tea or coffee or wine or any of our liquid spells, the drink must be matched perfectly with the drinker to get the best effect. If the match is a good one, the coffee will get to know you a little while you drink it, to know you and love you and cheer for your victories, lend you bravery and daring. The tea will want you to do well, will stand guard before your fear and sorrow. Afternoon tea is really a kind of séance. And at the end of it all, the grounds—or leaves!—left in the bottom of your little cup are not really prophecies but your teatime trying to talk to you, to tell you something secret and dear, just between the two of you.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There

Catherynne M. Valente
“A library is never complete. That’s the joy of it. We are always seeking one more book to add to our collection.”
Catherynne M. Valente, The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There


Reading Progress

June 14, 2012 – Shelved
June 14, 2012 – Shelved as: out-in-2012
February 12, 2013 – Started Reading
February 17, 2013 –
page 85
32.95% "diese Schattensache finde ich total faszinierend"
February 18, 2013 –
page 119
46.12% "Ich liebe Aubergine *-*"
February 27, 2013 – Shelved as: 0-i-love-you-so
February 27, 2013 – Shelved as: about-fairytales-mythology
February 27, 2013 – Shelved as: best-of-2013
February 27, 2013 – Shelved as: form-book
February 27, 2013 – Shelved as: read-in-2013
February 27, 2013 – Finished Reading
May 22, 2014 – Shelved as: 0-all-the-feels
May 22, 2014 – Shelved as: 0-unique-ideas
May 22, 2014 – Shelved as: 0-i-want-to-quote-everything
May 22, 2014 – Shelved as: 0-i-want-to-live-in-your-world
May 22, 2014 – Shelved as: 0-in-love-with-the-characters

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