bobo's Reviews > Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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May 12, 2012

it was amazing
bookshelves: classics, favorites
Read 5 times

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Quotes bobo Liked

Jane Austen
“There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“What are men to rocks and mountains?”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Angry people are not always wise.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am excessively diverted. ”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“A girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.
It is something to think of”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have not the pleasure of understanding you.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“How despicably I have acted!" she cried; "I, who have prided myself on my discernment! I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust! How humiliating is this discovery! Yet, how just a humiliation! Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our aquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome."
"And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody."
"And yours," he replied with a smile, "is wilfully to misunderstand them.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Till this moment I never knew myself.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“But people themselves alter so much, that there is something new to be observed in them for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice


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