Otis Chandler's Reviews > Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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it was amazing
bookshelves: classics, fiction, favorites
Recommended for: everyone

** spoiler alert ** So the other day Elizabeth and I are in the book store and she saw this book, and said she really wanted me to read it. In horror at the thought of reading what I thought was a 'chick book', i immediately countered that she would then have to read one of my favorites: Dune. She agreed!

So I read it, and I have to admit, it was good - damn good. Even though there was a serious lack of any gratuitous violence, I tore through it in several days. Austen is an amazing writer, and has a particular talent for explaining her characters deep motivations (or prejudices) in a few defining sentences.

I think my favorite part of it is the unwinding of Elizabeths' prejudices against Mr Darcy. It is done so slowly and artfully and believably that the reader is completely pulled into the story.

It is a definite period piece - here are a few funny observations:
- Nobody in the book had a job - they all earned income from their estates
- Since nobody had jobs they spent all day gossiping
- People were judged not by what they did for a living but what family they were from and how they behaved in society. Completely different from today!
- Dating was much tougher back then. You needed at least 10 dates to get anywhere, and you probably had to marry in order to go all the way.

Jokes aside, this is a classic, and I highly recommend it for any guy or girl.
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Quotes Otis Liked

Jane Austen
“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”
Jane Austen , Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of someone or other of their daughters.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice


Reading Progress

Started Reading
October 1, 2006 – Finished Reading
October 10, 2006 – Shelved
December 5, 2006 – Shelved as: classics
December 5, 2006 – Shelved as: fiction
May 8, 2014 – Shelved as: favorites

Comments Showing 1-4 of 4 (4 new)

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message 1: by Hemant (last edited Aug 20, 2013 11:52PM) (new)

Hemant Jadhav - People were judged not by what they did for a living but what family they were from and how they behaved in society. Completely different from today!
- Dating was much tougher back then. You needed at least 10 dates to get anywhere, and you probably had to marry in order to go all the way.


Still holds true in parts of India.


Diane I remember being in live book club and admitting that I did not like the book. As you might have guessed, I was in the minority.


Natalie Joy Thank you for being a man who appreciates Jane Austen literature!


Arya *Bibliomaniac!* Fraser Stark Glad you enjoyed as much as I did - and you're right about the unwinding of Lizzie's prejudice...was my favorite to read as well!


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