Tyson Adams's Reviews > The Conquest of Bread

The Conquest of Bread by Pyotr Kropotkin
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really liked it

"All things are for all." Not sure if that is an Amazon store tagline or an anarchist catchphrase.

Pyotr Kropotkin's The Conquest of Bread is an outline of the failings of capitalistic systems, a critique of the failings of communist systems, and a proposal for a system free from hierarchies and poverty. Regarded as a classic text of political anarchism, particularly as the criticisms of communism were seen to come true in the twentieth century, Kropotkin is probably more relevant today than when he was writing.

The Conquest of Bread was an interesting read that I couldn't belp but feel was politically current, whilst being socially historical. The overall political message and much of the details Kropotkin goes into are insightful and you can see why the Occupy Movement and Breadtube were inspired by this book. With the rise of higher levels of mechanisation, and with the coming automation of huge parts of the economy, there is much to be said for a rethink of how our society is run.

Socially, however, many of the points are a little dated and/or naive. After reading chapter 9 (The Need for Luxury) I commented that this was definitely written a hundred years ago. While I don't think he is incorrect, removing status and consumerist ideals does change our wants, it was a statement that did exist in a time when cars didn't exist. This changed landscape necessitates a slightly different idea of what people want, need, and what will be "normal".*

There were a couple of points that I disagreed with. Kropotkin was a little simplistic in dismissing “middlemen” as doing nothing. While Bullshit Jobs apply, there is still the need of things like distribution and organisation by middlemen. This is probably because Kropotkin is imagining a system that is much more localised than our current global system. Which leads to my next point on specialisation. While there is something to be said for his ideas around everyone pitching in and learning something of what others do and contribute, Kropotkin doesn’t really appreciate the idea of specialisation and having high levels of skill vs the average person who can do it but sucks at it. His example, which is a critique of Adam Smith's pin maker, is true to an extent. But our modern technology operates at a much higher level now. There is no way an office worker could go out to the farm and be a farmer for a few days. They could do menial labour on the farm, sure, but farming is highly complicated now, and not something you can just do for a few days a year, as he suggests.

I could go further into the problems with his understanding of agriculture, which is... antiquated. But those quibbles don't detract from the idea of being able to provide food for all. In fact, removing the profit motive from agriculture might alleviate a lot of problems.

A very interesting read that I'd highly recommend.

* It was notable that while "men" were the focus, there were some particularly progressive ideas about women in society. If he had been writing after the advent of the pill, I'd bet the comments would have been downright modern.
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Reading Progress

January 24, 2020 – Started Reading
January 24, 2020 – Shelved
February 2, 2020 – Finished Reading

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Tyson Adams Definitely written a hundred years ago. Still applies and probably even more relevant as tech improves.
Little simplistic in dismissing “middle men” as doing nothing. While BS jobs applies, there is still the need of things like distribution and organisation by “middle men.
Specialisation. While there is something to be said for his ideas around everyone pitching in and learning something of what others do and contribute, Kropotkin doesn’t really appreciate the idea of specialisation and having high levels of skill vs the average person who can do it but sucks at it.


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