Kemper's Reviews > The Warehouse

The Warehouse by Rob Hart
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really liked it
bookshelves: 2019, dystopia, bidness, sci-fi, thriller

I received a free advance copy of this for review from NetGalley.

You load sixteen drones, and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt…

It’s the near future, and the giant company Cloud dominates the economy with its massive warehouses that are essentially cities where the employees live and work. However, the CEO of Cloud, Gibson Wells, has just announced that he’s dying of cancer so there’s change on the horizon as a couple of new employees meet during the hiring process. Paxton’s dream of running his own business was destroyed by Cloud, but now he needs a job so he finds himself on a security team. Zinnia acts like just another person looking for work, but in reality she’s been paid by a mysterious client to infiltrate Cloud and uncover some of its secrets.

Unfortunately, it’s hard for Zinnia to find holes in Cloud’s security, and even harder when she is worn out from long shifts spent running to fill orders. A relationship with Paxton might be her best way to complete her mission, but can she use him like that if she actually likes the guy?

On the surface this seems like your standard dystopian tale with some idealistic folks trying to take down an evil corporation, but this book is deeper and more subtle than that. For starters, the characters aren’t stereotypes. You might expect Paxton to be bitter and angry about his company being destroyed by Cloud and having to go to work for them, but he’s actually a guy who still believes that he can achieve his dreams by good ideas and hard work. Zinnia isn’t a radical trying to change the world either. She’s a mercenary doing a job for money, and while she has no love for Cloud she’s not looking to take it down either.

We also hear from Gibson Wells in the form of messages he’s releasing as he does a final farewell tour of the company he built, and that includes some of his history. At first his folksy tale of how he started Cloud with little more than an idea and some furniture scavenged from a closed school gives us the impression that this is the American dream taken to its fullest potential. Especially when Wells lays out that part of his goal for creating the Cloud facilities was to provide good jobs while helping to stave the increasing ravages of climate change by making the greenest facilities possible. It all sounds very reasonable, maybe even honorable. Yet as we learn more and more about how Cloud actually works Wells’ defense of his business tactics start to ring increasingly hollow.

For example, all the Cloud employees are on a rating system where their performance is constantly evaluated and a star value assigned which Wells explains came from his old grade school days when he always tried to get all the points possible on his assignments. That sounds good, but when average performance might get you fired then it’s a constant battle to be great, even perfect. Which then means that the standards shift to a point where people literally have to run themselves ragged to meet the minimum performance level.

Another thing the book does an excellent job at is showing just how falling into a routine might be the most dangerous and depressing aspect of all. There are several points where both Paxton and Zinnia get into the rut of just doing their job, returning to their small apartments, watching TV, falling asleep, and then doing it again. This, more than anything, might be the thing that lets Cloud flourish. If your employees have to expend so much physical and mental energy to get through an average workday that they just want to collapse into a stupor every night then they’re never going to have the time or gumption to try and shake things up in any way.

So this is a well written book with a timely message that I thought it was excellent. It also depressed the hell out of me because I read it on device I got from the company that Cloud is obviously based on. Now I’m posting a review on a website owned by that same corporation. Even though I don’t directly work for that company it’s changed my life in many ways, and I went along with it because it was cheap and convenient without wondering too much where it all ends. Oops.

Even worse is that after reading this now, at a time when billionaires make the rules and the bottom line is used to justify everything they do, I don’t see a way that it gets better without humanity going all the way down Fury Road and just starting over.

But hey, it’s still a good book so go ahead and read it. Just maybe try to find a copy in an independent bookstore.
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Reading Progress

August 21, 2019 – Started Reading
August 21, 2019 – Shelved
September 2, 2019 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-11 of 11 (11 new)

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message 1: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Great review, Kemper. Makes me think of all the reviews I haven’t written because I’m crazy busy at work and exhausted from the long commute.


Kemper Nancy wrote: "Great review, Kemper. Makes me think of all the reviews I haven’t written because I’m crazy busy at work and exhausted from the long commute."

Thanks. That is one of the most depressing aspects because it seems all to familiar.


message 3: by Lauren (new)

Lauren Great review, even as the description of this world made me shudder. And I have an independent bookstore trip in my future this weekend--may use the opportunity to pick this up.


Kemper Lauren wrote: "Great review, even as the description of this world made me shudder. And I have an independent bookstore trip in my future this weekend--may use the opportunity to pick this up."

Thanks! I hope you can find a copy there.


message 5: by TXGAL1 (new) - added it

TXGAL1 Outstanding review. I've added to my list!


Brandon I too read this on my.. Cloud.. e-reader.


Kemper TXGAL1 wrote: "Outstanding review. I've added to my list!"

Thanks. Hope you like it.


Kemper Brandon wrote: "I too read this on my.. Cloud.. e-reader."

We are part of the problem...


message 9: by Isobel (new)

Isobel "But hey, it’s still a good book so go ahead and read it. Just maybe try to find a copy in an independent bookstore."

Yes - such a good point/reminder.

While your review is lovely, I am curious as to how the author managed to point out the tedium and danger of falling into a routine without writing in a manner that is boring. Do you have insight into how Hart achieved this?


Kemper Isobel wrote: ""While your review is lovely, I am curious as to how the author managed to point out the tedium and danger of falling into a routine without writing in a manner that is boring. Do you have insight into how Hart achieved this?..."

Some of it was just good writing establishing the rhythm, but he also uses a couple of tricks to get the point across at a few points. It's better read than described.


message 11: by 00mongoose (new) - added it

00mongoose Kemper, once again, you have lured me into adding another book to my list with one your superb reviews. This weekend, I'll be out hunting down a copy of the warehouse....and yes, the hunt will be strictly at the independent bookstores around here, lol.
Keep up the great work Kemper!!!


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