Lisa RC's Reviews > Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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Mar 06, 2012

it was amazing
bookshelves: classic, romance, good-concepts, deeep, a-fiction
Read from June 25 to 30, 2012

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Quotes Lisa Liked

Jane Austen
“From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman's daughter. So far we are equal.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley’s attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty: he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this she was perfectly unaware: to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot forget the follies and vices of other so soon as I ought, nor their offenses against myself. My feelings are not puffed about with every attempt to move them. My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who had made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“A girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.
It is something to think of”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have not the pleasure of understanding you.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“How despicably I have acted!" she cried; "I, who have prided myself on my discernment! I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable mistrust! How humiliating is this discovery! Yet, how just a humiliation! Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our aquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if I have very good luck, I may meet with another Mr. Collins in time.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You either choose this method of passing the evening because you are in each other's confidence, and have secret affairs to discuss, or because you are conscious that your figures appear to the greatest advantage in walking;— if the first, I should be completely in your way, and if the second, I can admire you much better as I sit by the fire.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome."
"And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody."
"And yours," he replied with a smile, "is wilfully to misunderstand them.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“The power of doing any thing with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance. - Mr Darcy”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“However, he wrote some verses on her, and very pretty they were.”
“And so ended his affection,” said Elizabeth impatiently. “There has been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!”
“I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love,” said Darcy.
“Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Oh!” said she, “I heard you before, but I could not immediately determine what to say in reply. You wanted me, I know, to say ‘Yes,’ that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but I always delight in overthrowing those kind of schemes, and cheating a person of their premeditated contempt. I have, therefore made up my mind to tell you, that I do not want to dance a reel at all--and now despise me if you dare.”
“Indeed I do not dare.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“All the world is good and agreeable in your eyes.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never. ”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?"

Sometimes. One must speak a little, you know. It would look odd to be entirely silent for half an hour together, and yet for the advantage of some, conversation ought to be so arranged as that they may have the trouble of saying as little as possible.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Do you dance, Mr. Darcy?"
Darcy: "Not if I can help it!"

Sir William: "What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing, after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished societies."
Mr. Darcy: "Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world; every savage can dance.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Mr. Darcy began to feel the danger of paying Elizabeth too much attention.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Books--oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same
feelings."

"I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be
no want of subject. We may compare our different opinions.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
tags: books

Jane Austen
“You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner." (Elizabeth Bennett)”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Yes," replied Darcy, who could contain himself no longer, "but that was when I first knew her; for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and every body hoped that he would never come there again.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She certainly did not hate him. No; hatred had vanished long ago, and she had almost as long been ashamed of ever feeling a dislike against him, that could be so called. The respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some time ceased to be repugnant to her feelings; and it was now heightened into somewhat of a friendlier nature, by the testimony so highly in his favour, and bringing forward his disposition in so amiable a light, which yesterday had produced. But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of good will which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude.--Gratitude not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough, to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. He who, she had been persuaded, would avoid her as his greatest enemy, seemed, on this accidental meeting, most eager to preserve the acquaintance, and without any indelicate display of regard, or any peculiarity of manner, where their two selves only were concerned, was soliciting the good opinion of her friends, and bent on making her known to his sister. Such a change in a man of so much pride, excited not only astonishment but gratitude--for to love, ardent love, it must be attributed; and as such its impression on her was of a sort to be encouraged, as by no means unpleasing, though it could not exactly be defined.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“She attracted him more than he liked.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“In nine cases out of ten a woman had better show more affection than she feels.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“I do not find it easy to talk to people I don't know.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world that he can spare from me.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Oh! certainly," cried his faithful assistant, "no one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with. A woman must have a thorough knowledge of music, singing, drawing, dancing, and the modern languages, to deserve the word; and besides all this, she must possess a certain something in her air and manner of walking, the tone of her voice, her address and expressions, or the word will be but half-deserved."

"All this she must possess," added Darcy, "and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Come Darcy,' said he. 'I must have you dance. I hate to see you standing around by yourself in this stupid manner.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“But if I were you, I would stand by the nephew. He has more to give.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
“Well, my comfort is, I am sure Jane will die of a broken heart, and then he will be sorry for what he has done.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice


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