Jenny (Reading Envy)'s Reviews > Bright

Bright by Duanwad Pimwana
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Kampol is a child left behind by his parents at a young age and has to fend for himself with the help of various friends and characters in his community. This is the first novel by a Thai female author to be translated into English and it was a delight to read. Where other authors would craft this story as a trauma narrative, this is much more about his daily life and the people he interacts with along the way.

In the same month I read Bright, I finally read The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures. Early on the author mentions a Hmong folktale:
"One of the recurring characters in Hmong folktales is the Orphan, a young man whose parents have died, leaving him alone to live by his wits... he is clever, energetic, brave, persistent.... "
Sounds familiar, right? I couldn't find any evidence of the author being anything other than Thai, but folktales do travel. It puts it in a different light if this might be a modern day telling of a traditional myth, at least for me. It would be a reference that local audiences would get immediately while those of us reading it in translation may not. If you've read this one, do you think I'm on to something?
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Reading Progress

April 21, 2019 – Shelved
April 22, 2019 – Started Reading
April 22, 2019 –
page 102
55.43%
April 23, 2019 –
99.0%
April 23, 2019 – Finished Reading
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: read2019
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: subscription-tlp
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: around-the-world
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: asia2019
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: location-thailand
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: women-in-translation
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: translated
April 28, 2019 – Shelved as: newest-literary-fiction-group

Comments Showing 1-5 of 5 (5 new)

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Elyse Walters I’m looking forward to reading this. I met the author and her translator yesterday at the Bay Area Book festival and bought her book.
The author talked ( via her translator of the written book who had never translated - on the spot with questions before), about her purpose behind this book - ( more to point out things in society - than personal to her directly)...
Great question... giving me pause and thought.
Looking forward to reading this slim book,


Jenny (Reading Envy) Elyse wrote: "I’m looking forward to reading this. I met the author and her translator yesterday at the Bay Area Book festival and bought her book.
The author talked ( via her translator of the written book who..."

That's so neat that they were there! Were they brought in by Two Lines Press?


Elyse Walters Yes....and Two Lines Press had their own book tent too --with the other vendors.
One thing that stayed with me was that the author said (well, the translator translated) --that this book was written as a message to 'society' --but not so much a deep personal book -as in especially close to herself.
Maybe you know more than me? I haven't read it yet. I have a few other books I need to read first -- but I'm looking forward to it --and am especially moved for the author -- "First novel by a Thai woman to be published in the states".

Your review is great -with heart -and encouraging! Wishing you well!!! xo


message 4: by Jill (new) - added it

Jill Hmong people are from Southeast Asia, to include Thailand,


Jenny (Reading Envy) Jill wrote: "Hmong people are from Southeast Asia, to include Thailand,"

Yes, but the author does not identify as being from that group of people.


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