Kara Petrucci's Reviews > Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
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Jan 30, 2012

really liked it
bookshelves: to-read, adventure-whore, sexist-hogshwot

Besides the sexism and obvious obsession Dick has with tits in this novel, it offered a rather different portrayal of dystopia. The overlying subject of the novel seems to be the significance of being a living entity and having the ability for empathy and compassion. However, the novel constantly tests the characteristics that make humans human. Society programs individuals to behave in a certain way and perceive the world in such a way that fits the conventional mold.

J.R Isodore plays the role of social deviant; labelled as a "chickenhead" and outcast because of an arbitrary IQ test. Isodore is emotionally abused by both the android and human characters. Isodore provides the moral compass; he treats all living things and electric with respect. No other character comes close to having his moral strength. The novel pokes fun at the flaws of social consensus. Who is more alive: the androids rebelling against their programming, or Deckard continuously moving against his moral judgement towards the arbitrary goal of climbing the social ladder?

One star lost for sexism and elaborate breast descriptions at inappropriate times. Perhaps Dick is too observant of the way a woman's breast move while she is talking.
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message 1: by Roman (new)

Roman A man enticed by a woman's breasts...shocking stuff indeed. But it's about as "sexist" as a woman admiring, say, a man's rippling back muscles or his tight six-pack and abs. Something else to consider..is it Dick's breast "obsession" or Rick Deckard's? If some of the gender roles seem sexist, bear in mind when the story was written and the prevailing culture at the time.


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