Claire McAlpine's Reviews > Praise Song for the Butterflies

Praise Song for the Butterflies by Bernice L. McFadden
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it was amazing
bookshelves: african-american-women-writers, fiction, historical-fiction

Interested in the inspiration for writing a novel, this one intrigued me; Bernice McFadden visited Ghana in 2007 and while she was there met two women who told her about a rehabilitation centre and a tradition referred to as trokosi, which they explained and suggested she write a book about, an idea she initially laughed at, but after researching the practice, a story began to emerge that she eventually pursued.

The novel is set in a fictional nation of Ukemby (avoiding comparison with the geography and customs of a specific African country), the first two pages provide a brief history of this fictional land, with its recent colonialist history, new schools, a period of outlawing African God worship or speaking local languages and their subsequent independence, freeing people to openly practice older customs and traditions.

Shrine slavery was one of the traditions that ascended from the darkness back into the light.

A slim 3 page chapter entitled AFTER New York City 2009, sets the reader on edge wondering what happened to lead to that collision of events, as the first provocative sentence opens with:
On the morning of the day she killed him, the sun sat high and white in a sky washed clean of clouds by an early-morning downpour.

From there we move into BEFORE, Port Masi, Ukemby 1978 – 1985. The novel gripped me from its opening pages and made me not want to do anything but stay with young Abeo as if to hasten her escape from the wretched situation superstition put her in.

We know from the blurb that she is going to be sacrificed by her father, under pressure from his mother, to atone for a curse believed to have been passed down from their ancestors. Until that moment, it seems impossible, given the early success and education of her parents, I read those initial pages, wondering what it could be that changed the good fortune of this happy family.

When Aunt Serafine comes to visit from New York, the family take a trip across the border to Ghana, and visit the slave castle. After debating whether or not it is appropriate to take young Abeo, her mother relents and she joins them. A sense of foreboding lurks as they descend into the dark interior of the castle, her imagination running rife.
What struck fear into her young heart was the history that lay beyond the wooden panels and brass hardware. Morris had revived history and little Abeo was finding it hard to distinguish between the now and what had been. Morris reached for the door handle and Abeo’s breath caught in her throat. She ordered her eyes to close, but they refused, and so she braced herself for the vision of the ship bobbing on the ocean, its deck teeming with shackled cargo.

It’s when things go wrong, when the family’s luck changes and the son comes under the undue influence of his mother (I recall this similarly in Ayobami Adebayo’s excellent Stay With Me ) that relationships get tested, families risk disintegrating and wives become disempowered.

When Abeo’s family falls on hard times, her father, in his desperation begins to doubt himself and the system that should bring justice. Instead he is lead to follow the old ways, thinking it will bring him peace of mind. In an impulsive moment, seized by and giving in to terror, he does the unthinkable, delivering his daughter to a religious shrine.
It was 1985; Abeo was nine years, seven months and three days old.

I worried the story was going to depict brutality, especially after recently reading House of Stone, where Novuyo Rosa Tshuma exposes the reader to the graphic horror of Gukurahundi, in newly independent Zimbabwe, however I was relieved to discover that McFadden spares us the terror if not the cruelty, we imagine what happened, though thankfully there’s no visceral portrayal. One reader asked why she chose to spare readers this, suggesting her method was more like leading a reader by the hand to the truth rather than holding them by the head to something too awful to take in.
In my earlier works I was much more graphic with my descriptions of horrific events. I think pulling back from that had much to do with me seeing so much violence against Black people on the news and social media platforms. Subjecting my character, myself or the reader didn’t seem to serve anyone involved.

Interested in the title, I looked up ‘Praise Song’ and learned it is one of the most widely used poetic forms in African literature; described as ‘a series of laudatory epithets applied to gods, men, animals, plants, and towns that capture the essence of the object being praised’.

It becomes a form of metaphor, the butterfly a symbol of transformation and rebirth; in the novel Duma, the oldest of the priest’s sons rips a newspaper to shreds, intending to ignore what has been read inside it, the pieces are picked up by a gust of wind, catching the girls’ eyes, seen as butterflies. Though an illusion, it signifies a turning point, a sign of hope, of liberation, they are experiencing life in one form and soon will transform.
Duma folded the newspaper and looked directly into his father’s milky eyes. “It means the government has outlawed what we do here. It means no more trokosi.

Abeo glanced up and for one fleeting moment her spirit soared. Indeed, at that distance, the bits of newspaper did appear to be a cluster of white butterflies. Abeo watched until the air went still and the false butterflies dropped out of sight.

It was 1998 and Abeo was twenty-two years old, eight months and seventeen days old.

The characters are well depicted, the surroundings set the reader’s imagination alight, we’re taken on a journey, introduced to a terrifying ritual that morphs into another form of traditional domination, however there are shining lights, hope has been gifted a role to play and Abeo has been permitted to interact with it.

I loved the natural, gifted storytelling of this novel, the historical exploration and psychological insight and in particular that she was able to create a scenario that showed us what a healing transformation might look like in the form of resilience.
This is a story of survival and triumph. I want people to understand that their circumstances don’t always, and shouldn’t always, define their entire lives.
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Reading Progress

January 11, 2019 – Shelved
January 11, 2019 – Shelved as: to-read
January 11, 2019 – Shelved as: african-american-women-writers
January 11, 2019 – Shelved as: fiction
February 9, 2019 – Started Reading
February 10, 2019 –
page 150
56.82% "Utterly compelling. Modern, financially successful couple return to the country of their birth living in comfortable circumstances, even if disapproved by the mother-in-law. But when their luck changes, how quickly her influence, and the old superstitious ways invade their minds, and lead them to consider the unthinkable."
February 10, 2019 – Finished Reading
February 14, 2019 – Shelved as: historical-fiction

Comments Showing 1-3 of 3 (3 new)

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message 1: by Markus (new)

Markus Hi, Claire. I like your review. I doubt I would like the book, however.


message 2: by Claire (last edited Feb 14, 2019 08:04AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Claire McAlpine Oh, it made me want to read more of her books, her ability to step inside an aspect of another culture and expose the dilemma between tradition and modernity, between one generation and the next, between familial obligation and partnership.


Carmel Hanes Lovely capture of this interesting read.


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