Tyson Adams's Reviews > Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

Amusing Ourselves to Death by Neil Postman
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it was ok

Being prophetic is really easy when you make a "kids these days" argument.

Amusing Ourselves to Death is Neil Postman's ode to the "good old days" before television when entertainment wasn't ruining everything. TV bad, reading good!

I decided to read this book after it once again started to be referenced as prophetic in the modern age. The first time someone mentioned this book to me I couldn't help but feel the argument was likely to lack substance - you can amuse and inform at the same time.* What I found in this book was a supposition that isn't without merit - slogans and sound bites can be influential whilst lacking any substance - but is argued in a cherry-picked and biased manner.

One example is how Postman claims that political campaigns used to be written long-form to influence voters, whereas now (meaning then in 1985, but many say it is highly relevant today) we get political messages in sound bites and 30-second adverts. This argument underpins his work and is at best convenient revisionism, at worst it is naive drivel. To suggest that there is no modern day long form political articles (and interviews, etc) is rubbish, just like the idea that the historical long-form articles he alludes to were well read by the masses is rubbish.

Another example is Postman claiming that media organisations aren't trying to (in general) maliciously misinform their audience. We know that this isn't the case. Even at the time this was written there were several satires addressing how "news" is deliberately framed for ratings (e.g. Network, Brave New World, the latter he references in the book).

Now, his idea that we should be trying to educate kids to be able to navigate this new media landscape - instilling critical thinking, understanding of logic, rational thought, basic knowledge so that we are less likely to be fooled - is laudable. I completely agree. I'd also agree that there is a desperate need for this in people of all ages when we have an attention economy in place that is less interested in informing you than making sure your eyeballs stay glued for the next advert. I think this is why Postman's book has resonated with people, the arguments aren't without merit. But they are also deeply flawed and problematic.

I can't really recommend this flawed book, but it isn't without merit.

Interview with Postman:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRabb...

Attention Wars:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDTae...-

* This modern review from an education professional sums up this point:
"Instead of striking a balance between the use and over-use of media in education, Postman has completely shut down the debate in the belief that there is no good way to use visual media like the television and film in education. If you take his thesis to its logical conclusion, the number of technological tools in the classroom would be reduced to the overhead projector, the ScanTron grading machine, the copier and the laser pointer, and the field of educational technology would be greatly reduced in the process."**

(PDF) Book Review - Amusing Ourselves to Death - Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publicat... [accessed Dec 29 2018].

** Read this review particularly carefully. The author cites a number of problematic sources for claims made, such as Ben Shapiro, David Barton, Glenn Beck, Jonathan Strong (of The Daily Caller). All are known to deliberately misrepresent their sources (e.g. see my review of Ben Shapiro's book covering this issue).
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_B...
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Reading Progress

December 28, 2018 – Started Reading
December 28, 2018 – Shelved
December 29, 2018 – Finished Reading

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