Kelly's Reviews > [Dis]Connected: Poems and Stories of Connection and Otherwise

[Dis]Connected by Michelle Halket
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bookshelves: read-in-2018, reviewed

Uneven, yet ultimately worth it.

(Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through NetGalley. Trigger warning for rape.)

"There is a story about a man who watched me bathe nude and was so overcome with adoration and desire that he approached me. They say I turned him into a deer before he could even speak and watched his hunting dogs rip at his flesh. Men have spent thousands of years romanticizing their unwanted advances, their assaults. They have spent just as long demonizing women for their anger and their retribution.”

- "The Unholy Wild," Trista Mateer


Mama raised us on her own, a house full of girls, though it wasn’t really a house. We lived up on the third floor and every summer when the heat would rise, we would fight like animals over the bathroom for a cool shower and a few moments of privacy. And when the door-banging and screaming stopped and one of us was nursing bruised knuckles, Mama would call us out into the living room. “I am raising a house full of girls,” she’d say, her voice tired. And the three of us would look down at our feet, quiet and sorry. Because Mama only ever called us girls when we had really fucked up.

Otherwise, she called us her babies, and she loved us even more than she was afraid for us.

- "Ultra," Yena Sharma Purmasir


It’s a shame, really, how humans try to take the things they’re not allowed to have.

- "Small Yellow Cottage On The Shore," Amanda Lovelace


So the concept behind this collection of poems and short stories, explained by editor Michelle Halket in the intro, is brimming with promise and intrigue:

The concept and theme of the book are of being connected. We seem to live in a hyper connected world, yet we increasingly hear stories of loneliness, isolation and disconnect. This book is about connecting poets with each other; connecting poetry with short fiction; and publishing stories about connection and/or a lack thereof. The premise was this: Each of the fully participating authors was to submit three poems adhering to this theme. These three poems would be assigned to a randomly chosen counterpart. That counterpart would select one of the poems and write a short story based on it.


Like most anthologies, though, the result is somewhat uneven: There are pieces I loved, adored, and cherished - poems and short works of fiction that will stick with me for days and weeks to come. Others were merely forgettable, and there were even one or two that I skimmed or skipped altogether. That said, the gems are shiny enough to make the mining worth it.

Let's start with the premise. Whereas I expected (rightly or not) a focus on technology, and how it binds us together - and drives us apart - the theme of connection was approached in a much more general way. More often than not, "connection" was just a stand-in for relationships, and all their messy bits: love and loss, joy and grief, rebellion and oppression. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but I had hoped for a collection with a sharper focus. You might feel otherwise.

The convention of further linking each piece together by repeating a line from the previous work, while an interesting idea, didn't work for me in practice: rather than feeling organic, the lifted lines mostly had a clunky feel to them. I don't think it helped that they appeared in bold to further draw attention to them. I think it would have been more fun to let the reader spot the bridges for herself, no?

As for the pieces themselves, I'll be honest: I picked up [Dis]Connected for one reason and one reason only - because Amanda Lovelace's name was connected to the project. And her contributions do not disappoint! Her poems are among my favorites; "A Book and Its Girl" is both playful and lovely, and "Sisters: A Blessing" hints at what's in store for us with her third installment in the Women Are Some Kind of Magic series, The Mermaid's Voice Returns in This One.

Ditto: "Small Yellow Cottage on The Shore," in which a sea witch must defeat the scariest monsters of them all - entitled white men - in order to save the love of her life, a selkie kidnapped for the purposes of sex trafficking and forced marriage. Oh, and her long lost love, another selkie similarly victimized. (The only thing I didn't love about this story? That they let the dudebros live. This isn't a silly prank or harmless mistake, but rather organized, systemic rape. LET YOUR RETRIBUTION RAIN DOWN FROM THE SKY! SLAY THEM ALL! LET NO RAPIST DRAW ANOTHER EARTHLY BREATH!)

[Dis]Connected also introduced me to some new favorites: every word Yena Sharma Purmasir writes is magic, from her short story "Ultra," to the poems "Things That Aren't True" and "If My Aunt Was On Twitter @lovelydurbangirl." Trista Mateer's "The Unholy Wild" gives a voice to Artemis, goddess of the hunt, along with a girlfriend and (an ever narrowing) place in contemporary society. It is wild and beautiful and fiercely feminist; it's no mystery why I pictured her as a topless Leslie Knope. Iain S. Thomas's "Driving With Strangers" is alive with some of the most achingly beautiful imagery you'll ever read, while "A Way To Leave" by R.H. Swaney and Liam Ryan's "The Train" are the most wonderful kind of melancholy.

The only piece I actively disliked - had a visceral "oh gross!" reaction to, in point o' facts - is "Where the Sea Meets the Sky" by Cyrus Parker. A #MeToo story told from the perspective of the (accidental? are we really supposed to read it that way?) rapist, it just felt wrong and unnecessary. Our culture is overflowing with this POV; what are we to gain from experiencing a "date rape" through the perpetrator's eyes? Hard pass.

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Reading Progress

December 13, 2018 – Started Reading
December 13, 2018 – Shelved
December 13, 2018 – Shelved as: read-in-2018
December 20, 2018 – Finished Reading
December 28, 2018 – Shelved as: reviewed

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