Kemper's Reviews > Dune

Dune by Frank Herbert
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it was amazing
bookshelves: sci-fi, space, favorites, 2017-reread
Read 2 times. Last read April 3, 2017 to April 23, 2017.

I have to write this review without rhythm so that it won’t attract a worm.

In the distant future Arrakis is a hellhole desert planet where anyone who doesn’t die of thirst will probably be eaten by one of the giant sandworms. It’s also the only place where the precious spice melange can be found so it’s incredibly valuable, and the honorable Duke Leto Atreides has been ordered by the Padishah Emperor to take over control of Arrakis from his mortal enemies, the House Harkonnen. While this seems like a great offer on the surface the Duke and his people realize that it’s actually a cunning trap being set by the Emperor and Baron Harkonnen.

The only hope seems to be allying with the local populace called Fremen whose harsh environment has led them to become an incredibly tough and disciplined people, but they have their own vision of what Arrakis should be. They also have a prophecy about the coming of a messiah figure who will lead them to freedom, and the Duke’s son Paul looks like he may be exactly who they’ve been waiting for.

This is classic sci-fi that really deserves the label. What Frank Herbert accomplished in one novel is stunning because he built a fascinatingly detailed universe in which the politics, religion, economics, espionage, and military strategy are all equally important. He then blended these more grounded concepts with bigger sci-fi ideas like being able to use spice to see through space-time, and the scope of that encompasses trying to pick the proper path through various potential timelines as well as free will vs. fate.

I think one of the factors that helps this story stay timeless is that so much of it is based on what humanity becomes vs. trying to predict what futuristic technology would be like. This is a society that once had a war with machines and has since rejected any type of computers so people have developed to fill the gap with the help of the spice. The Mentats are trained to use data to predict outcomes. The Navigators of the Guild have used so much of the spice to help them move through space that they’re mutating. The all female Bene Gesserit have developed a variety of skills to place their members alongside positions of power to help advance their breeding scheme that spans generations. Herbert also cleverly came up with an excuse that explains why knives and hand-to-hand combat are so important with the idea of the personal body shields.

So even though we still got a good sci-fi’s novel worth of cool gadgets the emphasis is on what the people can do and how that’s developed over a long period of time. It also adds a lot of depth to the political dimensions because all of these groups have different agendas that cause them all to mistrust each other, but because they all fill these various roles none can exist with the others.

There are also parallels to our world that are still in play because the idea of a desert people caught up in the power struggles of various outsiders because of their valuable natural resource is an obvious allegory to the Middle East that still works today. Plus, the classic film Lawrence of Arabia came out a few years before Herbert published this, and you have to think that it had some influence on him because there are elements of the story that seem very much inspired by it.

While the whole concept of a Chosen One has gotten a bit worn over time that’s not Herbert’s fault, and this is still a fantastic sci-fi story with big ideas that also works as space opera as well as being an epic adventure story.
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
July 2, 2008 – Shelved
April 3, 2017 – Started Reading
April 23, 2017 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-18 of 18 (18 new)

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Steelydanrules 5 stars? Have you gotten soft in your old age?


message 2: by Lyn (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lyn Another awesome review


Julie Kemper, thanks for giving Dune some love today. If a book makes you want to ride a giant sandworm, then the writer has done his job!


Kemper Lyn wrote: "Another awesome review"

Thanks!


Kemper Julie wrote: "Kemper, thanks for giving Dune some love today. If a book makes you want to ride a giant sandworm, then the writer has done his job!"

I don't know if I want to ride a sandworm, but I would like a stillsuit.


message 6: by Lyn (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lyn It would look cool, but didn't they recycle all (ALL) your body fluids for reuse? I'm down with recycling ... until I have to recycle me, then I like plumbing and AC


message 7: by Kemper (last edited Apr 23, 2017 03:24PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kemper That's a good point. Forget the stillsuit. I'll take a bunch of spice instead.


message 8: by Lyn (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lyn the spice must flow


Samuel Thanks for the review! I plan on reading this soon.


message 10: by Mike (new) - added it

Mike Fantastic review of a classic, Kemper.


message 11: by Lauren (new)

Lauren I need to actually read this. For years, people have been giving me copies of Dune almost at random and then disappearing from my life, so I should get to it sometime to stop the cycle. Awesome review.


Kemper Mike wrote: "Fantastic review of a classic, Kemper."

Thanks.


Kemper Lauren wrote: "I need to actually read this. For years, people have been giving me copies of Dune almost at random and then disappearing from my life, so I should get to it sometime to stop the cycle. Awesome rev..."

I'd send you a copy, but now I'm scared that I might vanish afterwards.


Kristina Good review. Makes me want to re-read the entire series.


message 15: by F.R. (new)

F.R. Some people have MOBY DICK, I have DUNE - a grand, important novel that I should have read yet never actually have.

A very good review above, Kemper, and as a response I will do my damndest to have read it by the end of the year.

(Feel free to call me out on the 1st of January if I haven't).


Kemper Kristina wrote: "Good review. Makes me want to re-read the entire series."

I tried hard with the sequels and some of the prequels, but for me nothing ever came close to this one. It's the Lonesome Dove syndrome. Fantastic first book but I was always disappointed in everything else associated with it.


Kemper F.R. wrote: "Some people have MOBY DICK, I have DUNE - a grand, important novel that I should have read yet never actually have.

A very good review above, Kemper, and as a response I will do my damndest to hav..."


Thanks! I'll try to remember to remind you at the end of the year.


Kristina Kemper wrote: "Kristina wrote: "Good review. Makes me want to re-read the entire series."

I tried hard with the sequels and some of the prequels, but for me nothing ever came close to this one. It's the Lonesome..."


I read the books up till Heretics of Dune, then I got distracted or something. This was years ago in high school during my heavy-duty sci-fi/horror/fantasy years. The only book I honestly remember is Dune. It was so bizarre and the world-building is so complete that it made a huge impression on my 16 yr old brain. My goal within the next few years: reread the Dune series AND Asimov's Foundation series. Whew.


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