Terry Marshall's Reviews > Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story

Stride Toward Freedom by Martin Luther King Jr.
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it was amazing

Stride Toward Freedom is Dr. King’s first book, published in 1958. In part, it’s the story of the 1955-6 Montgomery, Alabama, bus boycott initiated by Rosa Parks’ historic refusal to give up her seat on a city bus for a white person. The boycott went on for 381 days, and Stride Toward Freedom give’s King’s account of the behind-the-scenes struggle to build a movement based on the philosophy of nonviolent protest.

Besides the boycott story, though, in a chapter titled “Pilgrimage to Nonviolence,” King lays out his intellectual journey to his belief in nonviolence as major way of achieving civil rights for Negros (as Blacks were called in 1963). In terms of the civil rights movement, this essay is a must-read. But it’s far broader than civil rights—it’s a persuasive argument to oppose war, a bible for conscientious objectors.

In the last chapter, “Where Do We Go From Here,” King analyzes the Montgomery experience, calling it a signal for historic change, and offers a plan for a “militant and nonviolent mass movement.”
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Quotes Terry Liked

Martin Luther King Jr.
“It is not enough for the church to be active in the realm of ideas; it must move out to the arena of social action.”
Martin Luther King Jr., Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story

Martin Luther King Jr.
“Violence as a way of achieving racial justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. The old law of an eye for an eye leaves everybody blind. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding; it seeks to annihilate rather than to convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love.”
Martin Luther King Jr., Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story

Martin Luther King Jr.
“Many white men fear retaliation. The job of the Negro is to show them that they have nothing to fear, that the Negro understands and forgives and is ready to forget the past. He must convince the white man that all he seeks is justice, for both himself and the white man.”
Martin Luther King Jr., Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story


Reading Progress

Finished Reading
September 21, 2018 – Shelved as: to-read
September 21, 2018 – Shelved

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