Kat (Lost in Neverland)'s Reviews > The Prisoner of Cell 25

The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans
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Dec 30, 2011

did not like it
bookshelves: wtf, boring-as-shit, le-sigh, not-worth-the-hype, watch-for-flying-tables-everybody
Read from December 30, 2011 to January 01, 2012



Oh, why why why why why why why why WHY did I read this horrible, cliche-ridden book? So I can give a bad review of it, that's why!

description


So, in brief, this book is about Michael Vey, a teenager that has electrical powers. Here's the cliche part: Michael Vey is a scrawny teen that's constantly bullied, his best friend's a nerdy loser, and the main girl in the story is the most popular and prettiest girl in school. Oh, she's also a cheerleader.

Michael soon finds out that Taylor, aka 'most popular and prettiest cheerleader in school', also has electrical powers like he does. What a co-wink-e-dink! <--how the hell do you spell that? Right after they find out that they both have powers, Taylor says; "We should start a club!"
I highly doubt a fifteen year old girl (cheerleader!) would say something like that. I swear, these kids act like they're in elementary school instead of high school.

Shortly after they (meaning Michael, Taylor, and his best friend Ostin) form the club, they find out that Taylor and Michael's power isn't as coincidental as they thought. Someone is looking for them, and that someone kidnaps Michael's mother and Taylor on his birthday. He sets out to find them.

The biggest issue I have on this 'book' is the horrid writing. We are talking about an adult, correct? A twelve year old could write this book better.
Example:

Taylor looked around. She caught Zeus staring at her. He looked away. She thought he was cute.

It was full of 'I said, she said, he said, I asked, I said, he said etc...' Put some depth behind your characters, for cheese sakes! The characters had no depth whatsoever, I felt the author didn't even try with this book.

And what's with the name? 'The Prisoner of Cell 25'? Cell 25 only comes in once in the book, and not for very long, so I don't get why they'd name the book after such a small part in the book.

Five pages into the book, I was already insulted.

Unlike you, I live in Idaho. Don't ask me what state Idaho is in -news flash- Idaho IS a state.

The writing talks down to its reader, like the reader was stupid. This line is insulting because a lot of people live in Idaho, or have lived in Idaho (I grew up in Idaho!), plus, everyone above second grade knows Idaho is indeed a state. I realize the author was doing this to be funny, but to me, it just immediately made the main character sound like a little shit.
The very next line in the book is also insulting;

For one, I have Tourette's syndrome. You probably know less about Tourette's syndrome than you do Idaho.


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Both my brother and my sister have been diagnosed with Autism and Asberger's for as long as I've known, so yes, I know many forms of mental illnesses. And again, this sentence talked down to its reader, even worse than the Idaho one.

It's also ridden with pathetic attempts at humor (Ostin imagining himself being rich and famous one day surrounded by hot 'chicks' who worship him wasn't funny, it was angering).
In one particularly irritating sentence, Michael asked his mother what he should get Taylor for her birthday and asked her what girls liked. She replied; "Trust me, we're all the same. We like clothes and jewelry. And flowers."


description


"We're all the same"?!?!?!


I never had a more powerful urge to throw the book across the room at that point.

Here's a list of a few things I like:
Books
Animals
Reading
Music
Manga/Anime
Video Games
Geeky TV shows from the 60's and 70's

Do you see clothes on this list? Or jewelry? Or flowers? I don't think so! If he got that from his wife then she hasn't been out much; if he came up with that himself, he's a sexist bastard. Not every woman likes clothes and flowers and jewelry. That's just stereotypical bullshit.

The only thing I liked about this book is that their powers weren't 'magical' but scientific. They were slightly realistic and I could imagine them happening. In a Marvel comic

So as you can see, I really hated this book. It got kind of interesting towards the end, but I still despised it, and will NEVER EVER READ AGAIN. I urge you, do not read this book if you care about your intelligence!

Thanks for reading.

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Reading Progress

12/30/2011 page 29
9.0% "He's constantly bullied, his best friend's a nerd, the girl in the story is a cheerleader, NOPE, THAT'S NOT CLICHE AT ALL! *sarcasm*"
12/30/2011 page 46
14.0% "Okay, they just found out that they both had weird electrical powers, and that their birthdays are right next to each other; they form a club. WTF!"
12/30/2011 page 57
17.0% "The author actually put his own name in the book! "I have a cousin named Richard, he has Tourette's syndrome. Everyone calls him King Richard cause, he's like, amazing on a skateboard or any kind of board." I will say it again, W.T.F" 9 comments
12/30/2011 page 82
25.0% "This is literally painful to read. "The three of us walked downstairs. I glanced at my watch. It was around ten thirty." That is really how it's written!!"
12/31/2011 page 132
40.0% "it's finally got interesting, but the writing is still horrid. Taylor and Michael are such babies." 1 comment
01/01/2012 page 247
76.0% "Finally getting interesting"
01/30/2016 marked as: read

Comments (showing 1-50 of 96) (96 new)


message 1: by Demo (new)

Demo Jeez. It sounds like the author was trying to offend people! Seriously, who doesn't know that Idaho is a state and not a city?(that lives in America, anyway. I don't know the geography curriculum for other countries)

And I don't have the slightest interest in flowers in jewelry! (Can't say the same about clothes. I love creepy dresses and stuff.) Those stereotypes are so old and cliche. We are most definitely not the same.

He shouldn't just assume we're totally clueless about Tourette's Syndrom. I also have a sibling with autism, and know several people with Tourette's. I get the fact that not everyone knows about it and therefor he should explain a bit about it, but he doesn't have to be so condescending and rude!


Kat (Lost in Neverland) I know!! It was literally FIVE pages into the book, I was reading it in the store! After I read that, I came home and removed it from my library list. That was a few months ago, but I saw it at the library and thought "What the hell?" One of the worst decisions I've ever made.

Lol, I like creepy dresses too, and graphic T-shirts from Mario and Luigi and video games. :)

I forgot to mention in the review about the pathetic jokes Evans put into the story to try to make it seem funny. Some were so bad I wanted to gag.


message 3: by Demo (new)

Demo Five pages. Is he even trying to get people to read his book? This thing has "cocky" written aaaallll over it.

It's hard not to like creepy dresses. They're just so... creepy! I especially like those short black frilly dresses with striped socks and tiny hats. They're so cool!

Like what? I want to hear an example!


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Not only that, you know that sometimes other authors will put praise on the book, either on the back, or sometimes below the author's picture on the back flap? Well, right below his own picture and description, the author put "Michael Vey is the most exciting character I've ever created. I can hardly wait to see what he does next." --Richard Paul Evans.

Those are so awesome! :D

Okay. *flips open the book and searches* Ah, here's something from Chapter 3


Mr. Dallstrom is the principal of Meridian High School, where I go to school. If you ask me, ninth grade is the armpit of life. And I was in the very stinkiest part of that armpit--the principal's office.
You could guess that I'm not fond of Mr. Dallstrom, which would be stating the obvious, like saying "Breathing is important" or "Rice Krispies squares are the greatest food ever invented"

Oh god, I forgot about this part! Where the author actually explains what 'pantsing' means!

"I say we pants him." This was a specialty of Wade's. By 'pants' he meant to pull off my pants--the ultimate act of humiliation.

Yeah, like some people don't know what 'pants' means!

Ostin pulled in his stomach. He thought my mother was a "babe", which made me crazy. Ostin was fifteen years old and girl crazy, which was unfortunate because he was short, chubby, and a geek, which is pretty much all you need to scare girls away. I have no doubt that someday he'll be the CEO of some Fortune 500 company and drive a Ferrari and have girls falling all over themselves to get to him. But he sure didn't now.


message 5: by Demo (new)

Demo I said it thrice and I'll say it again---THAT COCKY BASTARD! Who the hell does he think he is? Is he trying to sound like an obnoxious teenage boy? Because he's sounding like one himself!




message 6: by Kat (Lost in Neverland) (last edited Nov 30, 2013 03:49PM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Kat (Lost in Neverland) I think that's what he's trying to do, sound like a teenage boy, since the main character is fourteen years old. But still, I think he failed in that department. Michael is a total wimp, when his mother is kidnapped, (that's not a spoiler, it says it in the description of the book) he goes to his house a cries into his mother's bed. I like how he really loves his mother, but crying on your mother's bed for an hour isn't exactly going to help her. I don't think a teenage boy would do that, they have too much 'pride'.


message 7: by Demo (new)

Demo Yes, he most certainly failed.

Yeah. I think they'd head more in the anger direction, rather than crying.


message 8: by Aleixie (new)

Aleixie That's it! Your review convinced me to stay miles away!


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Khrystina wrote: "That's it! Your review convinced me to stay miles away!"

Good for you, Khrystina! :)


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

It's a chidrens book.It's not that bad.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Thomas wrote: "It's a chidrens book.It's not that bad."

I am a child/teen, I hated it. But that's your own opinion, I don't mind.


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

I didn't hate it, but it is not my favorite by far. And I agree, he thiks every kid that reads his book is probably stupid. And it is very unrealistic at the end when the battle or whatever you would call it, was going on, no one outside of the building seemed to notice gunshots being fired or grenades exploding.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Thomas wrote: "I didn't hate it, but it is not my favorite by far. And I agree, he thiks every kid that reads his book is probably stupid. And it is very unrealistic at the end when the battle or whatever you wou..."

I don't think it's good author writing to expect his readers are stupid, especially when he's a bestselling adult book writer, so wouldn't his adult fans read this book because he wrote it?
Yeah, and I would expect the building to have more security than that. If they have that much money, then I would think they would have a whole army of guards in or outside the building, yet it was described that there was only a couple dozen.


message 14: by Demo (last edited Mar 08, 2012 01:07PM) (new)

Demo Moira wrote: "This is the stupidest review I've ever read. I understand if you don't like the story, but how could you be offended by the kid saying you probably don't know where Idaho is? The point of what he..."

You know who's also a New York Times Bestselling author?

SNOOKI.

Also, it's very apparent that you're twelve, seeing as how immature your comment is. Grow up and learn to respect opinions.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Ðєsтʁσya wrote: "Moira wrote: "This is the stupidest review I've ever read. I understand if you don't like the story, but how could you be offended by the kid saying you probably don't know where Idaho is? The po..."

HAHAHAHHA! Nice one Demo!


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Moira wrote: "This is the stupidest review I've ever read. I understand if you don't like the story, but how could you be offended by the kid saying you probably don't know where Idaho is? The point of what he..."

I was offended because I lived in Idaho and I loved it there, which I mentioned in the review. It shows immaturity in a person when they say/comment on impulse, but I'm not going to overreact over it, like you just did.
Goodreads is a place to share reviews and books, not to blatantly call someone's review 'the stupidest thing you've ever heard'. I'm not gonna say much else, because I don't like insulting people younger than myself, but next time, you really should think before you comment. :)


message 17: by Demo (new)

Demo


Sonofhermesdude I'd like to say a few things-first off, enough with caps lock. It hurts the eyes and is a bad read. Second-as some one who works with autistic children across the spectrum (and considered partially on it)- If Evans was going for realistic dialouge, then achievement unlocked. Many kids higher up on the spectrum ( note, I said many, not all. There are just as many who don't apply) will be cocky, or tired of coming across people who are oblivious. If you ask me the camp bully and Jack/Wade were wusses compared to current situations. He would be blunt because a 14 year old Tourette harrassed most of his life would be blunt. This includes the Idaho comment. As for generalization, he already had a geek, and the mom comment was on par for older generations. If you ask me-he did ok. Could he have made Mrs. Vey wrong about the generalization? Sure. And by the way-unless I'm wrong, he never got around to giving a gift. Maybe she IS wrong about what Taylor likes. As for the cheerleader, yea it's cliqche, so what? HEROS used it and it worked (somewhat) and Taylor admits she's not shallow enough to go back yet. Every book needs a cute girl (Romeo & Juliet anyone?) and YA needs teenage hormones. You didn't like it, that's fine. But please don't rage to the world. Or else your raging will be answered.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) I'm happy we're going to be civilized about it, because if you note the last commenter on my review, Moira, she did it in a very immature way.
Alright, I agree that he had a right to be blunt, and me, being a blunt person, respect that. But I am just sick and tired of hearing Idaho jokes, and in the way that Richard wrote it, it made the reader feel stupid, like I stated in my review.
Yeah, the older generation of women (loving only clothes, flowers and jewelry) will probably agree with that statement, but he should have corrected it to the more previous generation. We're not stuck in the 1980's and 90's anymore.
Haha, Romeo and Juliet was more of a 'tragedy' than a romance, considering almost everyone died in the end.
I totally expect answers to my 'raging'. What you're basically saying is I can't write my opinion or review this book honestly, and that's a load of crap. Goodreads is a place to express your opinion of books, whether that opinion is good or bad.
This world needs some raging, otherwise, nothing would happen and we would all be slaves to the government.

Okay, that was a bit off topic, but it still makes my point.
Thanks for the criticism, I'm open to it. :)


Moira Death the Kat wrote: "I'm happy we're going to be civilized about it, because if you note the last commenter on my review, Moira, she did it in a very immature way.
Alright, I agree that he had a right to be blunt, and ..."


I'm sorry if my loudly stated comment offended you. I can assure you that I didn't mean it to start a war, especially one in which commentators are taking sides and I'm used as an example of immaturity to other people. Can we please stop arguing about this? It was my fault for sure for starting it, but I would really like to not start a fight.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Moira wrote: "Death the Kat wrote: "I'm happy we're going to be civilized about it, because if you note the last commenter on my review, Moira, she did it in a very immature way.
Alright, I agree that he had a r..."


We weren't necessarily fighting, though I will gladly stop whatever we're doing.
Just a helpful hint; when you go on someone's review and call it 'The stupidest review I've ever read', you should expect some replies to it. ;)


Sonofhermesdude You're welcome for the feedback. The rage part I was wrong about and I apologize. And yes. R&J was pointless but I couldn't think of another romance. Also, I did find out we were both wrong-Tourette's is often present in austism, but isn't autistc on it's own.


Rachel I'm currently about half-way through the book, and I still do not particularly like any of the characters. Like you said in your review, a lot of the book is cliche and insulting. The sexist and generally cocky remarks throughout the first half of the book have really ticked me off, but I'm trying to press past those and finish the book. I must agree that the scientific explanations behind their powers do indeed please me, but the rest seems overly cheesy and, honestly, kind of annoying. The fact that the story revolves around this mega-nerd with a seemingly amazing mother and a dead father kind of upset me from the start. To make his book worse, yes, the author made generalizations about his readers; he also put labels on all of his characters, which made them extremely boring and unrealistic. The too-gorgeous, super-sweet cheerleader is so incredibly infuriating, not to mention the overplayed bullies. Everything about this book so far has just screamed UNORIGINAL.
My overall idea of the author is as follows: a cocky, sexist pig lacking any real imagination. I hate to be so harsh toward the guy, but your review really got me revved up since it shed light on lots of things that actually had me upset. Thanks for writing this honest review.


message 24: by Kat (Lost in Neverland) (last edited Apr 22, 2012 07:13PM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Kat (Lost in Neverland) Rachel wrote: "I'm currently about half-way through the book, and I still do not particularly like any of the characters. Like you said in your review, a lot of the book is cliche and insulting. The sexist and ge..."

Thank you Rachel. :) And I agree, it's completely unoriginal. You're welcome, I try to be as honest as possible in my reviews.
I'm not sure why, but a part of my review is missing. It skips over to another paragraph for some reason, but I'm guessing it has to do with Goodreads changing it's format. For now, I can't get it back to normal.


Rachel Death the Kat wrote: I'm not sure why, but a part of my review is missing. It skips over to another paragraph for some reason, but I'm guessing it has to do with Goodreads changing it's format. For now, I can't get it back to normal.


Hmm, that's a shame. I'd love to read more if it gets fixed.


Wathira Nganga You don't seem to have read any young adult literature in a while, so here's a crash course: YA usually features a teenage protagonist with dead or absent parents, which gives he/she more independence. In recent decades, the protagonist also has some sort of magical or supernatural power. If these are too many cliches for you, I suggest you switch to another genre, because you'll just keep running into them in YA. "Talking down" to the reader is also not new, as Lemony Snickett's A Series of Unfortunate Events attests. The narrator is a teenage boy without much of a social life, and this is how he chooses to tell his story.

Sad to say, I don't know much about Tourette's syndrome or other neurological disorders. I needed Michael's explanation to understand exactly what he goes through on a daily basis. He's right about actors on TV portraying Tourette's as screaming swear words for no reason, and I assume it's as misunderstood as autism. In an interview with Glenn Beck, Richard Paul Evans says he also has Tourette's, and also had to deal with bullies and misconceptions when he was young.

Michael's mother is a fictional character. If she thinks that all women just want clothes and jewelry and flowers, it doesn't necessarily mean the author thinks all women are mindless Barbie dolls. One of the main characters, Taylor, is a female teenager who gets good grades in all her classes; she doesn't exactly fill the role of submissive woman that sexists usually prefer.

You must have just skimmed through the book if you missed all the emotional turmoil the characters go through, which is why I think you said they have no depth. When Michael is given the choice to electrocute one of his worst enemies, or watch his mother get electrocuted, he makes an extremely difficult decision that stems from his deep bond with his mother. He realizes it would hurt her just as badly to know he had willingly harmed another human being. Similarly, Hatch gives Taylor a difficult choice to hurt someone, and she has to choose between what she knows is wrong and following the wishes of a man who has given her anything she could financially want.

The one thing I agree with you on is the The Prisoner of Cell 25 in the title. Even though Michael's in there for 26 days, it doesn't have a huge part in the book or in Michael's character development. He's just as defiant when he comes out. Another thing I didn't like was the sob story behind the bully, which somehow justified what a jerk he was. I was picked on when I was young, and a bunch of those kids lived in big houses in nice neighborhoods. I didn't accept the insinuation that all bullies come from poor backgrounds, and therefore must be pitied. I did like that Jack and Wade eventually become allies. That would have been enough without the sentimentality.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Wathira wrote: "You don't seem to have read any young adult literature in a while, so here's a crash course: YA usually features a teenage protagonist with dead or absent parents, which gives he/she more independe..."

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Um, yeah, *coughs*, the ONLY thing I read is YA literature. I don't read anything else, considering I'm a teenager, not an adult who knows nothing of children or Young Adult literature.
I've read countless books that are a lot more unique than this book was, and much better written. I did find myself skipping a couple lines, but I'm not the one to skim through books, but I didn't find much emotional turmoil in this one.
Have you read the Warriors series, by Erin Hunter? That's basically the series I grew up on, and I've only read the first book in the Lemony Snicket series. Warriors is sad, emotional, full of love and hate and death, and yes, it is a children's book.

Michael Vey, however, showed me none of that. I didn't expect much from it, but I still expected a little bit more than what Evans gave me. This review is simply my opinion, (and part of it is still not fixed, and I can't do anything about it.) and I just wanted to voice it.


message 28: by Jim (new)

Jim Excellent review, Kat. I like your responses very much too. All of your points made perfect sense to me, and the writing was (as ever) very good.

Gotta watch out for those electrical powers. :D

P.S. One of my reviews got bollixed too, with a couple of my 'private notes' finding their way into it (no big deal, but a little disturbing and definitely confusing). I think some of the original review disappeared as well. :(


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Jim wrote: "Excellent review, Kat. I like your responses very much too. All of your points made perfect sense to me, and the writing was (as ever) very good.

Gotta watch out for those electrical powers. :D

P..."


Thank you, Jim! :)

That is very strange. I hope that doesn't happen again. Well, the good news is that my review is fixed now, and I hope yours was fixed as well. :)


message 30: by Jim (new)

Jim Thanks so much, Kat! I think maybe some of those electrical powers put the zap on my review, and I didn't even read this book.:)

If I have a copy of the original review on file, I will make repairs at some point. Keep up the good work, and I look forward to chatting soon!:)


message 31: by Luke (new) - rated it 4 stars

Luke Martinez I don't mean to bring about another fight, but i just couldn't keep my mouth shut.
Quite honestly Kat, I think that you overreacted. This IS considered a children's book and is written like one. I can kind of tell what kind of person you are, both from the way you write and your attitude towards things you don't enjoy. I am sure i am not the only one would very much appreciate it if you were not so harsh and hateful towards anything you don't like. If it really was that bad for you, just say, "It wasn't for me, and here's why." It is apparent that you wrote this review in a spout of fury and emotion, and I urge you to never do that again. Please think next time so you don't make yourself look like a fool.
I thought that, as you did, this book could have been written better. But unlike you, I saw past that and looked more at the story line and plot, which I thought was an interesting take on a classic circumstance. If you would be so kind, I think that you should learn from this situation to help you grow as a person. I, like you, am a teenager, and from a peer point of view, even I thought this review was childish. Please, next time, think before you write. No offense.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Luke wrote: "I don't mean to bring about another fight, but i just couldn't keep my mouth shut.
Quite honestly Kat, I think that you overreacted. This IS considered a children's book and is written like one. I ..."


WOW. I love how you say "I don't mean to bring about another fight" and "No offense. Saying 'no offense' after something doesn't make it less offensive.
Now, here's a few things;
1. There are a lot of people on Goodreads who write much harsher reviews than me. In fact, many are my friends on here and are viewed as very knowledgeable readers. You should check them out.
2. I don't give a flying shit about people like you who don't want me to do another review like this again. In fact, I will make many more, because I like to inform people about bad books before they read them.
3. I believe you should think before you comment on people's reviews, before you make yourself look like an imbecile. No offense. Seriously, why can't people just mind their own business and leave the freaking review if they don't like it?
Next time, if you really don't want to start a fight, don't comment.
Thank you.


message 33: by Jim (new)

Jim Kat (Loki's Loyal Handmaiden) wrote: "WOW. I love how you say "I don't mean to bring about another fight" and "No offense. Saying 'no offense' after something doesn't make it less offensive..."

Good for you, Kat.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Jim wrote: "Kat (Loki's Loyal Handmaiden) wrote: "WOW. I love how you say "I don't mean to bring about another fight" and "No offense. Saying 'no offense' after something doesn't make it less offensive..."

Go..."


LOL, thank you. :P


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Jesse *Countess of Cocoa* wrote: "Woah.
Kat, with a troll?
The world has gone to shit because Kat is an amazing person.



Nice review, Kat :)
And you responded awesomely :P

Oh, and I should really strt Soul Eater lol."


Awwww, thank you Jesse! *points to Jesse* My best friend, who is also an amazing person, right here!

Thanks so much! I try to not let the negative people get the best of me. :P

YES, you should. Let me know when you do. :D


message 36: by Jim (new)

Jim Kat (Loki's Loyal Handmaiden) wrote: "LOL, thank you. :P ..."

:D


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Jesse *Countess of Cocoa* wrote: "Yeah, with this string of trolls and bullying authors, its good to have a positive mentality :) .
My summer is pretty boring ( not right now though. Its event after event and its just like ugh. An..."


UGH, don't remind me of the damn heat. Thankfully, it's getting cooler, so that makes me happy. I hope the cooler weather gets to you soon.

Whaaaaaaaaaaat? O____O Er...where did you find that out?


Kat (Lost in Neverland) There isn't an episode with him drooling...actually, come to think of it, we never see him sleep. Yeah, it must have been a different show.

Ack, I hate allergies. I only have them in the spring, but they still suck. We sometimes open the windows, but if we turn the AC on, then we keep them closed.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Hahaha, at least you know now that Kid doesn't drool!

Have you ever tried congestion strips? You can buy them at stores; they're these strips that you put on your nose and it opens up your passages to let air in. They're really helpful, you should try them.

Ahh. Well, I hope you get better soon! :)


Leslie I completely agree with your review! Good for you for making it to the end. I couldnt even make it to Michael's birthday..I gave up. I had to constantly remind myself how old the characters are! I kept thinking he was in 8th grade. Honestly, it was just a mess. I'm happy to know I'm not the only one who thought that.


message 41: by BlackhamBoys (new) - added it

BlackhamBoys ... I tried to read through all the comments, I wish GoodReads made it a bit easier. As an adult, I do agree with many of your points :), also being female (I also don't care for clothes or jewelry, although I do like flowers) ... I read this because my 12 year old read it in school and raved about it, and he doesn't rave about any reading. I think some of the things that rubbed you wrong are probably going to keep immature boys entertained.


Sally Whoa. Everyone seems to have some....strong opinions. It's just a book, right?


Sullivan Harris This is literally the funniest review I have ever read. Every single thing in there I thought while reading it though.


Kat (Lost in Neverland) Sullivan wrote: "This is literally the funniest review I have ever read. Every single thing in there I thought while reading it though."

Thanks! :)


Benjamin Sullivan wrote: "This is literally the funniest review I have ever read. Every single thing in there I thought while reading it though."

Well, I thought it was dumb. XD


Kat (Lost in Neverland) BJ wrote: "Sullivan wrote: "This is literally the funniest review I have ever read. Every single thing in there I thought while reading it though."

Well, I thought it was dumb. XD"


Then why don't you fucking leave, dumbass?


Benjamin Well, I would really appreciate it if you cleaned up the language. It offends me. By the way, did you get my comment on The Articles of Faith?


message 49: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Wells So, I thought I'd wake this conversation from its slumber because, why not? I read YA modern fantasy/sci-fi like this book because I really like the modern/urban fantasy genre but on average the adult versions of such stories are shitty paranormal romances. I've never read a YA book that holds a candle to most of those stories for formulaic crap!

Overall I liked your review. The cliches that seemed to bother you so much didn't really bother me, though I certainly noticed them, and they do generally weaken the story.

I do have a couple of points I'd like to make though:

1.) I've met people like Taylor: physically beautiful people who aren't snobbish, mean, petty, etc. and are also very friendly and considerate. They are just damn beautiful people on the inside and the outside. Rare, but really pretty awe-inspiring when you meet one. In light of this, I found the Taylor/Michael interplay completely believable, so long as Taylor remains the only person like this in the story.

2.) Tourettes is not autism, autism is not tourettes (as far as I understand the current medical understanding of both disorders). They are similar in that they are both neurological disorders, and neurological disorders tend to come in groups, but having one doesn't imply the other as far as I've ever heard. The vast majority of people with tourettes are not on the autism spectrum at all, and from what I've read it isn't clear that the two are linked with any more prevalence than one would expect from chance. (Total tangent, but if you'd like a beautiful look inside the mind of a severely autistic boy, check out The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida)

I actually would have really liked if he had explained tourettes more than his little bit about "not everybody curses". In fact most people don't, and those who do generally do so because of the physical pain it causes them, not any involuntary urge to curse (it's a conditioning thing, start cursing because of the pain and eventually you can't help but curse when a bad twitch hits).

3.) The Idaho thing. Yeah, it was pretty condescending, but the sad fact is it's pretty true. That's what happens when you live in a state with a smaller population - people don't where it is. I remember hearing about study (it may have been more like an unscientific poll, so take this with a gigantic grain of salt) that showed Europeans knew more about American geography and history than Americans did. So you can pretty much expect Washington, Montana, Oregon, Nevada, Wisconsin, maybe California and Arizona folks to know where it is, and maybe a large fraction of the rest of the people in the upper mid-west too. The south and the east coast, though, you can forget it. And that's where most Americans live.

I grew up in and live in Alaska and until the reality TV shows hit (which I hate with a burning passion) I doubt a quarter of Americans knew enough about American geography to describe roughly where it is located without a map. That and everybody thought we lived in igloos year round.

So I feel your pain, but its truth. The average American is exactly like whatever the hell her name was when she asked "What state is Idaho in?"

4.) My personal beefs with the story were with the descriptions of the mechanisms behind the powers themselves. If you're going to bother with a scientific explanation, at least know a little about what you're talking about. I'd much rather the author simply named them and described their effects instead of trying to describe how they worked when he clearly didn't know enough physics to do so. It was so bad that I was pretty surprised when he actually had a power that gave off light and one of magnetism - I was almost positive he had no idea they were the same thing (actually I think he probably just knows they are somehow related, but not really how).

Electrolocation was my biggest issue in this vein. I just went by what the effects were, which were essentially a kind of radar, and ignored his description. Electrons don't go through shit. When you touch something, that's electron-electron contact. They repel each other. Electrons bounce off everything except metal and plasma, both of which they'll never return from (they should look like voids to Ian). Notice how your hand doesn't go through glass? For the same reason Ian shouldn't have been able to see out a window, let alone through half a building. It's not even like using electrolocation on metal would produce any kind of see through effect, because electricity isn't individual electrons traveling through metal. It's waves of EM charge, the electrons themselves don't move, so it isn't going to give him jack even if he manages to get some kind of pulse back (which he wouldn't). Same with plasma, for exactly the same reason.

The author also clearly didn't understand that radio, radar, microwaves, visible light, x-rays, gamma rays, etc. are all exactly the same thing, or Ian's power would have either been named differently or the effects would be different.

Last but not least, further exposing the author's ignorance, the EM force is what makes chemistry work. ALL chemistry. Think about that massive missed opportunity for a little bit.

Still, I managed to enjoy it, so I'll just shrug and say in spite of it all, I'm a huge sucker for these kinds of stories.


Sally Jeff, so yeah, I think that the actual story itself wasn't too bad. The technical mechanics of how it works was a bit like, okay? But you know, not everything's perfect. But I agree with how you said that things like the one time that Michael's Mom said that girls like flowers was not that condescending because they didn't repeat it over and over. It was just a comment because Michael didn't know what to get Taylor. But thanks for the extra stuff about electricity and stuff. That was interesting.


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