Hannah's Reviews > The Scarlet Letter

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
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Dec 28, 2011

it was amazing
bookshelves: books-i-own, school

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Quotes Hannah Liked

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“It is to the credit of human nature, that, except where its selfishness is brought into play, it loves more readily than it hates. Hatred, by a gradual and quiet process, will even be transformed to love, unless the change be impeded by a continually new irritation of the original feeling of hostility.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“We men of study, whose heads are in our books, have need to be straightly looked after! We dream in our waking moments, and walk in our sleep.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“In our nature, however, there is a provision, alike marvelous and merciful, that the sufferer should never know the intensity of what he endures by its present torture, but chiefly by the pang that rankles after it.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“It is a curious subject of observation and inquiry, whether hatred and love be not the same thing at bottom. Each, in its utmost development, supposes a high degree of intimacy and heart-knowledge; each renders one individual dependent for the food of his affections and spiritual life upon another; each leaves the passionate lover, or the no less passionate hater, forlorn and desolate by the withdrawal of his object.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“She could no longer borrow from the future to ease her present grief.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“She had not known the weight until she felt the freedom.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“Some attribute had departed from her, the permanence of which had been essential to keep her a woman. Such is frequently the fate, and such the stern development, of the feminine character and person, when the woman has encountered, and lived through, an experience of peculiar severity. If she be all tenderness, she will die. If she survive, the tenderness will either be crushed out of her, or—and the outward semblance is the same—crushed so deeply into her heart that it can never show itself more.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“She wanted—what some people want throughout life—a grief that should deeply touch her, and thus humanize and make her capable of sympathy.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“When an uninstructed multitude attempts to see with its eyes, it is exceedingly apt to be deceived.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“It is remarkable, that persons who speculate the most boldly often conform with the most perfect quietude to the external regulations of society. The thoughts alone suffice them, without investing itself in the flesh and blood of action.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Nathaniel Hawthorne
“All merely graceful attributes are usually the most evanescent.”
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter


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