Eric Farr's Reviews > The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple

The Road to Jonestown by Jeff Guinn
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really liked it

The Road to Jonestown is a compelling portrait of Jim Jones. He's a fascinating human, and his combination of socialism and an increasingly spiritualist interpretation of the Gospel seems very enticing (though obviously, with the benefit of hindsight, we can see that Jones was not a man worthy of following). Typically I don't see the appeal in cults, but that ideology and service-driven focus could have easily snagged 19-year-old me if I'd been around at the time. Just as interesting, Jones was able to gain legitimacy by obtaining membership within a nationally recognized church and by integrating himself into civil rights campaigning in Indianapolis and San Francisco. For all the abuse, control, and killing that would come down the line, he started off doing a lot of good. Yet that doesn't make up for the evil that was ultimately unleashed by his increasingly twisted, controlling psyche.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Jim Jones, Peoples Temple and Jonestown, cults in general, or even local histories of Indianapolis or San Francisco. Just a fascinating read, and quite well-researched too.

I had two complaints with the book that were perpetual minor irritants.

For one thing, Guinn repeatedly refers to "Indiana University" as "the University of Indiana." There are a lot of universities in Indiana, but the University of Indiana ain't one of them. No one I know who is an alumnus or fan of IU calls it that, and as far as I can tell, it never had that name in its history (certainly not in the mid-twentieth century). Despite this, it's a misnomer that Guinn uses frequently in the first third of the book, and he even indexes the university under this incorrect name. While it seems like he did his research about Indiana and appears to have visited at least Richmond and Lynn, this nonetheless made me repeatedly question his rigor of research and understanding of the state that, after all, formed Jim Jones into the adult and pastor who would form a church and campaign for civil rights reforms all before moving on to California.

The other complaint is that Guinn freely mixes the use of the terms "socialism" and "communism." This would be a minor irritant, but it made it difficult to understand what, exactly, Jim Jones was advocating for. It may be that Jim Jones left plenty of confusion on that point--his organization seemed socialist, but he was prepared to move to communist Cuba or Russia by the time of the Jonestown days. Nonetheless, if Jones's basic ideology was really so muddled as to be unable to distinguish between these systems of governance, it would have been nice to make that clearer in the text (or to make it clear that the confusion lay in communist countries referring to themselves as socialist). Especially in today's politically divided America of hyperbolic rhetorical extremes, where even commonly accepted government entitlements are derided as "socialist" and treated as equivalent to communism by an ever-growing subset of conservatism, I think it's important to use these terms as carefully as possible.

Those were the only things that bothered me while reading. It was a fast-paced, informative, and disturbing read. Guinn appeared to approach the matter with honesty and good faith. While in retrospect I would have preferred to learn more about the specifics of Jones's increasingly bizarre beliefs that appeared to combine government conspiracy theories with spiritualism, a belief in reincarnation, and socialism, Guinn still does an admirable job of tracing the public and private arc of one rather charismatic cult leader's life and self-serving death.
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Reading Progress

August 12, 2018 – Started Reading
August 12, 2018 – Shelved
August 12, 2018 –
page 133
29.3% "Very readable biography so far. Fascinating profile. Author leads the reader to certain conclusions without stating some of them explicitly. Jim Jones was a messed-up guy who amazingly did some good for Indianapolis early on.

Worst thing about the book so far? Guinn doesn't seem deeply familiar with Indiana history. And almost always calls IU the "University of Indiana"--even indexes it as such."
August 19, 2018 –
page 187
41.19%
August 25, 2018 –
page 231
50.88%
September 10, 2018 – Finished Reading

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