Ryan Patrick's Reviews > Introduction to Manuscript Studies

Introduction to Manuscript Studies by Raymond Clemens
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Dec 17, 2011

really liked it
bookshelves: medieval-history, non-fiction-2013
Read from August 13 to October 07, 2013

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08/13/2013 marked as: currently-reading
08/13/2013 page 3
0.0% "Preface - Developed in conjunction with a course at the Newberry Library, supplemented with manuscript images from the British Library."
08/18/2013 page 18
5.0% "Chapter 1 - Writing Supports. It never ceases to amaze me at the effort required to just prepare something to write on in the Middle Ages. I think of all the reams of paper just sitting at my office, waiting for some idiot to send some ad via fax for our secretary to throw away... but hey, at least no cows had to die in the process."
08/22/2013 page 35
11.0% "Chapter 2 - Whoever thought to do some of things medieval folk had to do just to get a little white or red or green ink for their books? My favorite was the big missing hole in one manuscript from where the toxic green ink had eaten away the illustration it bordered - as if life wasn't short enough in the MA, playing around with all these lead-based paints must have shortened a few lives even more."
08/29/2013 page 49
16.0% "Chapter 3 - Books are more than just a text on parchment, and each can take on a life its own. Most medieval books contain corrections - erasures or additions of missing text; some books are two-in-ones, where the main text is accompanied by a gloss (often longer than the original text); and a few can be read like an archaeological site, with layers of marginalia and other sorts of markings reflecting its history."
08/31/2013 page 65
21.0% "Chapter 4 - While not as labor intensive as the process of preparing the parchment, there was still work to be done to compile the individual quires into a book with a cover. These covers could be quite ingenious, as with the girdle binding which allowed you to carry the book with you, attached to your clothes, for perusal at your convenience; at the other extreme were methods of chaining books to desks in libraries."
09/09/2013 page 83
27.0% "There's a big difference between transcribing a manuscript and creating an edition."
09/16/2013 page 117
38.0% "These medieval manuscripts we value so much as is, have sometimes been through a lot of trauma in the name of 'fixing' or 'conserving'. Or, hey - I like that picture, it would look even better in this other manuscript whose text I like better. *snip snip* Now it's all good :-("
09/23/2013 page 134
44.0% "One of the most interesting aspects of the detective work involved with medieval manuscripts is figuring out where it was made and who owned it."
09/23/2013 page 134
44.0% "One of the most interesting aspects of the detective work involved with medieval manuscripts is figuring out where it was made and who owned it."
09/30/2013 page 179
59.0% "Finished Section II which looks at the scripts on the page, and how to analyze them. Some medieval scripts are really clear and legible; others, not so much."
10/04/2013 page 208
69.0% "The medieval computus is fascinating, and the manuscript charts created to help know when Easter, among other great feast days, was to be held each year are simply amazing."
10/08/2013 marked as: read

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