tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE's Reviews > Nova

Nova by Samuel R. Delany
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really liked it
bookshelves: sf

It's pathetic, I know. Samuel R. Delany was, at one time, in my pantheon of 3 favorite SF writers: the other 2 being J. G. Ballard & Philip K. Dick. &, yeah, he's still in that pantheon except that it's expanded to include the Strugatsky Brothers, Stanislav Lem, & 'James Tiptree' (Alice B. Sheldon). &, yet, I've listed a slew of bks by him that I've read & I don't remember a single thing about them. Hence, no reviews. My excuse, as usual, is that I read this stuff at least 20 yrs ago, At least I can remember my girlfriends from back then. "Nova" is probably the 1st of his bks where I felt like he was "in his stride", where his no-doubt-substantial life experience was beginning to manifest itself in a greater richness of characters & social detail than previously - his earlier novels having been precocious but maybe just a little bit too much of-the-genre & a little-too-little original.
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Tait Interesting, I actually haven't read any Delany yet, I am about to start in on "Dhalgren" tonight. Any thoughts on that one?


tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE "Dhalgren"'s one of the ones I 'remember' (barely) the most & one of the earliest ones I read. It's also one of my top 3 to 5 favorites of his. I read it while I was living in Baltimore & my fellow Baltimoreans who'd read it & I all agreed that its general atmosphere was akin to that of the city. It's the least SF of his SF, it's more a novel of inner-city 'decay' w/ a vague SF pretext to justify it. I reckon you'll like it alot. At any rate, it's a much better place to start than some of his slimmer early novels b/c his sociological observations are strong.


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