Laurie's Reviews > Villette

Villette by Charlotte Brontë
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Nov 23, 2011

it was amazing
bookshelves: bronte, penguin, favorite, fiction, mooched, pb

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Quotes Laurie Liked

Charlotte Brontë
“No mockery in this world ever sounds to me so hollow as that of being told to cultivate happiness. What does such advice mean? Happiness is not a potato, to be planted in mould, and tilled with manure. Happiness is a glory shining far down upon us out of Heaven. She is a divine dew which the soul, on certain of its summer mornings, feels dropping upon it from the amaranth bloom and golden fruitage of Paradise.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“To see and know the worst is to take from Fear her main advantage.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“For a long time the fear of seeming singular scared me away; but by degrees, as people became accustomed to me and my habits, and to such shadows of peculiarity as were engrained in my nature - shades, certainly not striking enough to interest, and perhaps not prominent enough to offend, but born in and with me, and no more to be parted with than my identity - but slow degrees I became a frequenter of this straight narrow path.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“The negation of severe suffering was the nearest approach to happiness I expected to know. Besides, I seemed to hold two lives - the life of thought, and that of reality.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“Certainly, at some hour, though perhaps not your hour, the waiting waters will stir; in some shape, though perhaps not the shape you dreamed, which your heart loved, and for which it bled, the healing herald will descend.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“Where, indeed, does the moon not look well? What is the scene, confined or expansive, which her orb does not hallow?”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“I believe that creature is a changeling: she is a perfect cabinet of oddities.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“There is a perverse mood of the mind which is rather soothed than irritated by misconstruction; and in quarters where we can never be rightly known, we take pleasure, I think, in being consummately ignored. What honest man on being casually taken for a housebreaker does not feel rather tickled than vexed at the mistake?”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“I would not be you for a kingdom.'

The remark was too naïve to rouse anger; I merely said -

'Very good.'

'And what would you give to be ME?' she inquired.

'Not a bad sixpence - strange as it may sound', I replied. 'You are but a poor creature.'

'You don't think so in your heart.'

'No; for in my heart you have not the outline of a place: I only occasionally turn you over in my brain.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“Now it is not everybody, even amongst our respected friends and esteemed acquaintance, whom we like to have near us, whom we like to watch us, to wait on us, to approach us with the proximity of a nurse to a patient. It is not every friend whose eye is a light in a sickroom, whose presence is there a solace.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“Que me voulez-vous?' said he in a growl of which the music was wholly confined to his chest and throat, for he kept his teeth clenched, and seemed registering to himself an inward vow that nothing earthly should wring from him a smile. My answer commenced uncompromisingly: -

'Monsieur,' I said, je veux l'impossible, des choses inouïes;”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“With self-denial and economy now, and steady exertion by-and-by, an object in life need not fail you. Venture not to complain that such an object is too selfish, too limited, and lacks interest; be content to labour for independence until you have proved, by winning that prize, your right to look higher. But afterwards, is there nothing more for me in life -- no true home -- nothing to be dearer to me than myself and by its paramount preciousness, to draw from me better things than I care to culture for myself only? Nothing, at whose feet I can willingly lay down the whole burden of human egotism, and gloriously take up the nobler charge of labouring and living for others? I suppose, Lucy Snowe, the orb of your life is not to be so rounded: for you the crescent-phase must suffice. Very good. I see a huge mass of my fellow- creatures in no better circumstances. I see that a great many men, and more women, hold their span of life on conditions of denial and privation. I find no reason why I should be of the few favoured. I believe in some blending of hope and sunshine sweetening the worst lots. I believe that this life is not all; neither the beginning nor the end. I believe while I tremble; I trust while I weep.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“His mind was indeed my library, and whenever it was opened to me, I entered bliss.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“I mean that I value vision, and dread being struck stone blind.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“But solitude is sadness.'

'Yes; it is sadness. Life, however, has worse than that. Deeper than melancholy lies heart-break.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette

Charlotte Brontë
“The love, born of beauty was not mine; I had nothing in common with it: I could not dare to meddle with it, but another love, venturing diffidently into life after long acquaintance, furnace-tried by pain, stamped by constancy, consolidated by affection’s pure and durable alloy, submitted by intellect to intellect’s own tests, and finally wrought up, by his own process, to his own unflawed completeness, this Love that laughed at Passion, his fast frenzies and his hot and hurried extinction, in this Love I had a vested interest; and whatever tended either to its culture or its destruction, I could not view impassibly.”
Charlotte Brontë, Villette
tags: love


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