Peter's Reviews > The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right

The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande
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it was amazing
bookshelves: business, business-group

Checklist
This is more than a book, it is a groundbreaking transformation. Having worked in the wider healthcare sector for over 30 years (not a clinician), you understand the levels of authority, the egos, and intransigence of senior healthcare professionals, especially in relation to their juniors and lesser deemed roles. The challenge has been, to inculcate something so obvious and relatively easy to implement, causes concerns that much of hard-earned experience and intellect can be reduced to checklists. Surely we need as many fail-safes as possible when people’s lives are at risk. Suck it up buttercup!

Atul Gawande has presented compelling evidence that checklists can have a dramatic impact on quality of care and healthcare outcomes. He has shown that this is repeatable around the world and not just in regions because they're have a poorer healthcare system, a state healthcare system or a private system.

If an aircraft pilot fails, he goes down with the plane. If the same consequence was applied to the failure of a medical consultant - we'd have checklists in every hospital tomorrow!
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Reading Progress

Started Reading
January 23, 2018 – Finished Reading
February 2, 2018 – Shelved
February 2, 2018 – Shelved as: business
April 22, 2018 – Shelved as: business-group

Comments Showing 1-3 of 3 (3 new)

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message 1: by NancyJ (last edited May 01, 2018 03:16PM) (new) - added it

NancyJ Nice review. I found checklists to be essential for safety, and I also used them to improve consistency in on-the-job training. This is an idea that I need to bring back to my everyday life as well. I have to admit that I can't always rely on my mental checklists, especially when there is a lot going on.


Peter Checklists are used in many industries particularly aviation but mainly due to ego in Healthcare, they don't seem to get widespread acceptance.

The third biggest killer in the developed world is medical errors.


message 3: by NancyJ (new) - added it

NancyJ Peter wrote: "Checklists are used in many industries particularly aviation but mainly due to ego in Healthcare, they don't seem to get widespread acceptance.

The third biggest killer in the developed world is..."


There are a lot of medical examples in change management books too, because the need is so strong. One hospital successfully (they said) altered the culture by training employees to remind doctors to wash their hands (or use sanitizer) if they didn't see them do it when they entered a patient's room. Enough doctors were on board with the program at the start that they helped influence others to comply good-naturedly. (Though i'm sure it wasn't that easy.)


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