Sydney Young's Reviews > Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Caroline by Sarah  Miller
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it was amazing
bookshelves: 2018-favorites, american-fiction, western, paris-life-column, my-audio-queue

I completely, utterly, loved this book. Kudos to the foundation for choosing such an accomplished writer to tell The story of a woman who thinks not much of herself at all, who tries to not take up space, to not speak in anger, and who taught me so very much by her grace. Kudos to Caroline, who had me in tears for her simple, fierce, love of her family, for her bravery. (Narration was superb).

Today we talk talk talk, behind our phones and in our safe places. But when it comes to doing, we fail the mark. Not Caroline. Love you all over again.
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Quotes Sydney Liked

Sarah  Miller
“A woman can resolve that, whatever happens, she will not speak till she can do it in a calm and gentle manner, she recited to herself as she waited for the flare of temper to ebb. Perfect silence is a safe resort, when such control cannot be attained.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“I don’t see how sugar could make that cornbread any sweeter than the prints of your hands already have.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“You may be afraid, but you may not let your fear chase you away from what must be done.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“A woman can resolve that, whatever happens, she will not speak till she can do it in a calm and gentle manner,”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“Perfect silence is a safe resort, when such control cannot be attained.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“it was not going she dreaded—only leaving.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“How many miles had they come? Less than halfway, and already Caroline had the sense that a separation such as this could put more than miles between folks, could right this minute be working changes she might not be entirely conscious of and might never realize at all unless she and Eliza saw each other again.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“we must all learn to do things we don’t want to do. You may be afraid, but you may not let your fear chase you away from what must be done.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“vista no wider than their own sunbonnets.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“Be thankful for what is given. Caroline heard the words in her mother’s voice. No matter if it is not enough, be thankful.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“it was as if she believed the special things they’d so enjoyed together should not be enjoyed apart.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“All her life she had longed to breach that pale and hazy boundary between enough and plenty.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“Author’s Note Caroline is a marriage of fact and Laura Ingalls Wilder’s fiction. I have knowingly departed from Wilder’s version of events only where the historical record stands in contradiction to her stories. Most prominently: Census records, as well as the Ingalls family Bible, demonstrate that Caroline Celestia Ingalls was born in Rutland Township, Montgomery County, Kansas on August 3, 1870. (Wilder, not anticipating writing a sequel to Little House in the Big Woods, set her first novel in 1873 and included her little sister. Consequently, when Wilder decided to continue her family’s saga by doubling back to earlier events, Carrie’s birth was omitted from Little House on the Prairie to avoid confusion.) No events corresponding to Wilder’s descriptions of a “war dance” in the chapter of Little House on the Prairie entitled “Indian War-Cry” are known to have occurred in the vicinity of Rutland Township during the Ingalls family’s residence there. Drum Creek, where Osage leaders met with federal Indian agents in the late summer of 1870 and agreed peaceably to sell their Kansas lands and relocate to present-day Oklahoma, was nearly twenty miles from the Ingalls claim. I have therefore adopted western scholar Frances Kay’s conjecture that Wilder’s family was frightened by the mourning songs sung by Osage women as they grieved the loss of their lands and ancestral graves in the days following the agreement. In this instance, like so many others involving the Osages, the Ingalls family’s reactions were entirely a product of their own deep prejudices and misconceptions.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“Though Wilder blamed her family’s departure from Kansas on “blasted politicians” ordering white squatters to vacate Osage lands, no such edict was issued over Rutland Township during the Ingallses’ tenure there. Quite the reverse is true: only white intruders in what was known as the Cherokee Strip of Oklahoma were removed to make way for the displaced Osages arriving from Kansas. (Wilder mistakenly believed that her family’s cabin was located forty—rather than the actual fourteen—miles from Independence, an error that placed the fictional Ingalls family in the area affected by the removal order.) Rather, Charles Ingalls’s decision to abandon his claim was almost certainly financial, for Gustaf Gustafson did indeed default on his mortgage. The exception: Unlike their fictional counterparts, the historical Ingalls family’s decision to leave Wisconsin and settle in Kansas was not a straightforward one. Instead it was the eventual result of a series of land transactions that began in the spring of 1868, when Charles Ingalls sold his Wisconsin property to Gustaf Gustafson and shortly thereafter purchased 80 acres in Chariton County, Missouri, sight unseen. No one has been able to pinpoint with any certainty when (or even whether) the Ingalls family actually resided on that land; a scanty paper trail makes it appear that they actually zigzagged from Kansas to Missouri and back again between May of 1868 and February of 1870. What is certain is that by late February of 1870 Charles Ingalls had returned the title to his Chariton County acreage to the Missouri land dealer, and so for simplicity’s sake I have chosen to follow Laura Ingalls Wilder’s lead, contradicting history by streamlining events to more closely mirror the opening chapter of Little House on the Prairie, and setting this novel in 1870, a year in which the Ingalls family’s presence in Kansas is firmly documented.”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited

Sarah  Miller
“How different it must feel to be a man: built solid through, with everything beneath the skin belonging solely to yourself. Did he ever envy what she could take into herself, how much she could contain? Could he comprehend all it meant for a woman to hold herself open for her husband, her children?”
Sarah Miller, Caroline: Little House, Revisited


Reading Progress

January 21, 2018 – Started Reading
January 21, 2018 – Shelved
January 21, 2018 – Shelved as: to-read
January 21, 2018 –
75.0%
January 22, 2018 – Finished Reading
March 21, 2018 – Shelved as: 2018-favorites
March 21, 2018 – Shelved as: american-fiction
March 21, 2018 – Shelved as: western
March 21, 2018 – Shelved as: paris-life-column
March 21, 2018 – Shelved as: my-audio-queue

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