Carrie Kellenberger's Reviews > Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery

Endurance by Scott    Kelly
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it was amazing
bookshelves: adventure, biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, favorites

Captain Scott Kelly has been on four flights to space and he is the US record holder for consecutive number of days spent in space. I don't know of any other person who has lived a life similar to his except for his identical twin brother Mark Kelly, who is also a fighter pilot, captain, and astronaut. Both brothers are also New York Times best-selling authors.

I started my 2018 reading journey on two books: Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery by Scott Kelly and A Column of Fire by Ken Follett. I have been reading Scott Kelly's book at night and Ken Follett's book during the day. I happened to finish this one first and my oh my - 6 STARS.

My hero has kept his hero status - not that I ever doubted Scott Kelly for a second. I've watched him rise in his career for years and followed his last space adventure with abnormal curiosity and utter fascination.

Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery is a captivating memoir of Scott's journey to space and back to Earth. It also recounts his years of work towards becoming a fighter pilot and his formative years. I loved his writing style and his simple accounts of life in Russia while he was preparing for his flights to space as well as his accounts of life aboard the International Space Station.

Time and time again, I was amazed at his observations and his perspectives on leadership, courage under pressure, and the importance of teamwork.

Even after reading his book, it is hard for me to wrap my brain around some of the challenges he endured during his year in space and how he kept his cool. From the challenges of taking off and landing to isolation from everything and everyone he knows on Earth to the effects of space on the human body, there are just so many things in this book that made me pause and think.

I loved his descriptions of how many types of aircrafts he learned to fly and the endless take offs and landings he performed in order to make his journey to space.

I loved the descriptions of his camaraderie with the Russian Cosmonauts in ISS and I marvel at how two countries that were once at war are now co-existing in the same space in SPACE.

I loved his compassion, his passion for life, and his sense of humor. I loved that he was able to describe his moments of unease and pain and push through them towards to horizon.

There was so much I loved about this book, it is hard to put it all into a review. I've color-coded the whole book for passages I want to refer back to, but in all likelihood, I'll be writing a second review again once I've had a change to reread it.

The only thing that really left me feeling dissatisfied with this book is that Captain Kelly doesn't address his issues with being back on Earth. The prologue mentions his pain, swelling and rashes, but the end of the book doesn't mention if these space symptoms have subsided or not.

I have often wondered if I'd feel pain in space, and he answers my question thoroughly, but I'd like to know more about how he has done now that he has been back on Earth. Did his symptoms subside? Did they get worse? I guess I'll have to wait for his next book to find out. Either way, this one unanswered question was minuscule in comparison to all the other questions he answered about his year in space.

Bravo, Astronaut Scott Kelly!

Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery is a true testament to the strength of human will and resilience and the endless glory of imagination. Kelly has led a remarkable life, he wrote an incredible book, and the underlying message of hope: to never give up, to always persist at what you want - these are all takeaway lessons that I will remind myself of daily.

Thank you, Captain Kelly, for your constant messages of hope and for your bravery and dedication to humanity.

Best Takeaway Quotes from my first read:

“I've learned that an achievement that seems to have been accomplished by one person probably has hundreds, maybe even thousands, of people's minds and work behind it, and I've learned that it's a privilege to be the embodiment of that work.”
― Scott Kelly, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery

“What is it worth to see two former bitter enemies transform weapons into transport for exploration and the pursuit of scientific knowledge? What is it worth to see former enemy nations turn their warriors into crewmates and lifelong friends? This is impossible to put a dollar figure on, but to me it’s one of the things that makes this project worth the expense, even worth risking our lives.”
― Scott Kelly, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery

I was up here as the only American with two Russian guys for six weeks this summer...and if something had happened to me, I would have counted on them for my life. We have a great relationship, and I think the international aspect of this program has been one of its highlights.
― Scott Kelly, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery

Yet the story of how we kept the space station cool - a huge chunk of metal flying through space getting roasted by the unfiltered sun for forty-five minutes out of every ninety while its enormous solar arrays generate electricity - is a story of engineering triumph with important implications for future space flight.
― Scott Kelly, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery
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Quotes Carrie Liked

Scott    Kelly
“I've learned that an achievement that seems to have been accomplished by one person probably has hundreds, maybe even thousands, of people's minds and work behind it, and I've learned that it's a privilege to be the embodiment of that work.”
Scott Kelly, Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery


Reading Progress

December 19, 2017 – Shelved
December 19, 2017 – Shelved as: to-read
December 19, 2017 – Shelved as: adventure
December 19, 2017 – Shelved as: biographies
December 19, 2017 – Shelved as: autobiographies
December 19, 2017 – Shelved as: memoirs
December 31, 2017 – Started Reading
January 9, 2018 – Finished Reading
April 12, 2018 – Shelved as: favorites

Comments Showing 1-3 of 3 (3 new)

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Laura Noggle This makes me so happy! I wish I could read it again for the first time, I’ll probably just review it again later.

You will really enjoy “The Right Stuff” by Tom Wolfe— I read it before this book and can see how it inspired Kelly so much. I also just finished “Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage” by Alfred Lansing and WOW! Couldn’t put it down, it’s clear why Kelly took it to space with him not once, but twice! A thrilling tale of endurance and stoicism in the face of almost certain death — could be applied to all three!


Carrie Kellenberger I'm going to do the same. I was reading this at night and Column of Fire during the day. (I'm enjoying Column of Fire just as much, but it's a totally different genre. It's also twice as long.)

Kelly smashed it out of the ballpark with his first book. I just really wish he had answered the question he put in everyone's minds in the prologue. I guess I have to wait for his next book.

I am astounded that both he and his brother are astronauts AND New York Times Bestselling Authors. I had no idea!

In regards to addressing the question I put on Facebook about this feeling pain in space, I guess that was answered to some extent. His symptoms from returning from space sound exactly like what I deal with on a day to day basis.

Maybe I can claim some sort of similarity since I will clearly not be going to space in my lifetime. (For some reason, I thought a zero gravity environment would also mean zero impact on my body. WRONG. Oh, well. I learned something new!)


Laura Noggle Carrie wrote: "I'm going to do the same. I was reading this at night and Column of Fire during the day. (I'm enjoying Column of Fire just as much, but it's a totally different genre. It's also twice as long.)

K..."


I think I missed the notification for this response—which is odd since I'm on here all the time. 😂

Twins have always intrigued me to no end, how wonderful to have two exemplary astronauts to help us learn about the biological effects of living in space.

I agree, I wish there had been more—but more everything! Hopefully he comes out with another books soon, I know it'd be a great read. 🤓


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