Daisy May Johnson's Reviews > The Murderer's Ape

The Murderer's Ape by Jakob Wegelius
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The titular Murderer's Ape is Sally Jones and she's also our narrator for this gently told story of murder, double-crosses and false imprisonment. It's an interesting note to take for such a dramatic series of topics but then again, Sally Jones is an interesting figure. She's the best friend of the Chief, and together they run a cargo boat. She's the engineer, who lives with humans, and although she doesn't speak she can understand everything that they say. The Chief and Sally Jones take on a job and it ends badly; the Chief is accused of murder, and Sally is forced to go on the run. Can she clear his name? Can she survive?

I read the hardcover edition from Pushkin Press (my thanks to them for the review copy), and it is a beautiful edition. I bang on a lot about the importance of design when it comes to books and this is perfectly and distinctly done. A book can look good, but one that looks good and distinct? That's important, and it's nicely done here.

Quietly and lengthily told, The Murderer's Ape isn't, perhaps, the quickest of books. It took me a while to read, but it wasn't a traumatic process in the slightest. Narrated by Sally Jones, this is a quiet tale of peril and trauma that skates the edge of some nasty topics (anarchism, forced imprisonment, the idle rich, revolutionaries, and abusive relationships) whilst never quite wholly engaging with them. Some of this distance comes from Sally's position of remove, never quite accepted for who she is except for when she's with her friends, and the overall effect is rather one of gentle disturbance.

That's not to say that this book doesn't pose some big questions. Far from it. Sally is constantly required to assert her presence in a world that is not wholly comfortable with her, and that question of negotiated identity is something very important to children's and young adult literature. The best of these books allow our protagonists to find out who they are and, more to the point, who they can be. Sally is aided and abetted on her quest by a variety of characters who illustrate both the good and bad sides of humanity. It's up to Sally to decide how to live, and to survive.

For me, The Murderer's Ape sits somewhere on the lower edge of Young Adult, and on the higher edge of Middle Grade literature, and that is something I welcome very much. This is a book which should be placed into the hands of those who want meaty content, but may be, perhaps, unable to deal with the darkest edge of what young adult can (and indeed, should!) provide. The short and precise chapters, told in Sally's clean and clear prose also would fit very nice as a bedtime read. There are eighty so it may be a lengthy process, but then again there's nothing wrong with a slow read and in fact, it's something that might prove quite appropriate to this rich and classic tale.
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
November 22, 2017 – Shelved
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: beautiful
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: classics
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: childrens-literature
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: coming-of-age
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: gifted-and-talented
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: gritty
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: historical
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: young-adult
November 22, 2017 – Shelved as: tearjerker

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