s.penkevich's Reviews > Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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Sep 24, 2011

it was amazing
bookshelves: favorites, russia, crime
Recommended for: Everyone

To go wrong in one's own way is better then to go right in someone else's.

I have been giving a lot of thought to this novel lately. Despite the three years that have gone by since reading Crime and Punishment—three years in which I’ve read some outstanding literature, joined Goodreads and written just over 100 reviews of the books I’ve journeyed through—Dostoevsky’s novel still resides on it’s throne as my personal favorite novel. No other web of words, brushstrokes or music melody has ever struck me so deeply and consumed me so completely as this book did. The author’s collection of works as a whole has left such a mark on my soul that I felt it necessary to permanently affix his likeness on my arm. Over a century has passed since its initial publication, yet Dostoevsky’s message is still as poignant today as it was when it was first inked onto paper. Crime and Punishment features an immensely engaging blend of intrigue; philosophy; political, social, moral and religious commentary, that all thread together to create a masterpiece of literature that captures the deep, raw core of the human condition when it is at it’s most gruesome and vulnerable. The exquisite literary genius of the novel evoked a strong emotional resonance in me and the timing of my reading was just right to forever wed me to my love of books.

Initially envisioned as two separate novels, one following the inner turmoil of a murderer and the other chronicling the melancholic destruction of a family due to a flighty, alcoholic patriarch, Dostoevsky deftly weaves together a multitude of unforgettable characters as they interplay through their tangle of plotlines. There are some incredible scenes that will forever haunt and delight me in my memory, such as the narrow escape from the scene of the crime which had me holding my breath in anxious anticipation, the darkly comical disaster of the funeral feast, or the emotionally charged and grim meeting between Dunya and the vile Svidrigaïlov. Each character is carefully balanced with their foil, each character is written with their own unique style of speech and language, and the novel seems to tie every thread together with such perfection and care as it churns forward, raining destruction on the lives of it’s characters to bring them toward their own personal redemption or demise.

This was a book that I was unable to put down as the words flowed from their pages to deep within my heart. Dostoevsky brilliantly straps the reader to the emotional states of his characters and is able to create seamless transitions between scenes or from the minds of one character to the next by riding the wings of an emotion. Most often this emotion is guilt, and the murder scene and it’s feverish follow-up is so expertly crafted that the reader feels they must share in Raskolnikov’s guilty burden. During the course of reading this book, I was overwhelmed by a crushing sense of guilt that was disconnected to any of my own actions. Yet, had police officers confronted me at any given moment, I would have held out my hands in surrender since I was so burdened by the guilty residue of the novel. What further linked me to the book was Raskolnikov’s illness following his crime. Maybe it wasn’t the novel taking root in my soul, perhaps it was due to the cold fall weather that was creeping in at the time, or perhaps it was due to my lack of sleep and early rising to embark on 10-12hr shifts in an unheated factory where I would work away amidst a cloud of aluminum dust, but I felt feverish and ill alongside Raskolnikov and his fever dreams. I don’t think I felt well again until after finishing the book.

I believe I read Crime and Punishment at the ideal moment in my life. I had spent the summer going through several of Dostoevsky’s other novels and falling madly in love with his writing. Then my whole life was uprooted. At the time I began C&P, I had moved across the state away from all my friends, family, and everything I knew and recognized, to live in Holland with my brand new baby daughter and work in a factory that could easily serve for a modern day sequel to Sinclair’s The Jungle. Looking back, I think I can see why I so easily soaked up Raskolnikov’s feelings. Dostoevsky shows how we are a product of our choices, and it is how we deal with our consequences that makes us who we are. I was placed in the new situation because of choices I had made, like choosing to skip class to smoke and read by the river, and Raskolnikov was faced with the guilt of his own actions. It was the most dramatic shift in my life and I am not a person who enjoys change, yet here I was without a familiar face and nobody to talk to. Crime and Punishment was there in my hand every morning and night as I walked between my home and car, like a friend holding my hand to comfort and encourage me in my exhaustion. It rode shotgun on my hour commutes like a faithful companion, and was the friendly face in which I could take refuge in on my breaks. When stripped of all I knew, there was literature to keep me sane and give me something to hold on to as my world spiraled out of control around me (my daughter was also a tether of sanity for me, but fatherhood was still new and intimidating at the time). Dostoevsky and his beautiful words became my friend and my passion, and in my solitude (because, let’s face it, I was very much an oddball in that factory and it took awhile to find my place there) I plunged myself deep into books, something I am very thankful for and feel that all the strangeness and loneliness of the existence is washed away by the glow I feel from grappling with my favorite authors. Then I discovered Goodreads and you all became incredibly dear to me. I don’t think I would have survived my time in that dark pit without you all, so, from the bottom of my heart, thank you.

I apologize that this isn’t really much of a review, I’m very excited for this review, as it was seeing this GR friend—one of which I hold in the highest regard and am always incredibly impressed by—reading Crime and Punishment that brought back a flood of memories of my times with the book as if I were Proust with his madeleines. I highly recommend this novel, and firmly stand by my choice of it as my favorite. Recently, I had to make a list for work of my top 5 favorite books, which was difficult to do, damn near impossible, but I realized how simple it was to put a book down in the #1 slot. I have read some incredible books since, Hunger (my love of which stems from the similarities to Dostoevsky I noticed in the book), Gravity’s Rainbow, or To the Lighthouse to name a few, yet nothing has ever left as deep of an impact on me as a reader and as a human being as this book. This is a fantastic book about the human spirit, about our deepest, darkest impulses, and shows that our own inner consciousness can dish out a far greater punishment than any legal system can. Now I need to sleep and sober up.
5/5

I did not bow down to you, I bowed down to all the suffering of humanity.

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Reading Progress

01/29/2016 marked as: read

Comments (showing 1-50 of 104) (104 new)


Samir Rawas Sarayji hear! hear!


message 2: by Nefariousbig (last edited Jun 05, 2013 01:10AM) (new)

Nefariousbig Thank you for always bearing your beautiful, soulful innards. I love your guts. (I think I've been reading too much gorror lately!)


message 3: by Angus (new) - added it

Angus I apologize that this isn’t really much of a review.

-But I feel that it's one of your best stuff here on Goodreads. Thanks for sharing. :)


message 4: by Samadrita (new) - added it

Samadrita I really need to finish reading this now. I have two failed attempts at continuation of reading, under my belt. :(


message 5: by Samadrita (new) - added it

Samadrita Angus wrote: "I apologize that this isn’t really much of a review.

-But I feel that it's one of your best stuff here on Goodreads. Thanks for sharing. :)"


Exactly what I felt about your review. One of your very best, S.Penk. It shows that you care deeply about this book.

P.S.:- Sorry about double posting.


Praveen One of my All Time Favorite novels


message 7: by Stephen M (last edited Jun 05, 2013 01:15AM) (new) - added it

Stephen M You light up my life S.penke. I'm not even exaggerating. I can't believe I know people like you on here to write such beautiful reviews while still thinking of me as someone of any authority on literature.

I honestly feel intimidated by this review, as well as the book. I feel like there's some greater plan at work in the novel that I am just not picking up on at all. I must read better!


message 8: by Stephen M (new) - added it

Stephen M And fuck yeah: ‘ I did not bow down to you, I bowed down to all the suffering of humanity.’


message 9: by Garima (new)

Garima I consider myself very lucky that I'm yet to read any Dostoyevsky. Just imagine all the awesomeness waiting for me but I'm equally lucky to read this gem of a review which made me fell in love with this book even without reading a single word of it.

Then my whole life was uprooted. At the time I began C&P, I had moved across the state away from all my friends, family, and everything I knew and recognized, to live in Holland with my brand new baby daughter and work in a factory that could easily serve for a modern day sequel to Sinclair’s The Jungle. It was the most dramatic shift in my life and I am not a person who enjoys change, yet here I was without a familiar face and nobody to talk to. Crime and Punishment was there in my hand every morning and night as I walked between my home and car, like a friend holding my hand to comfort and encourage me in my exhaustion.

THIS is great! Comes right from your heart and it shows. Absolutely fantastic review, Sven.


Brian Amazing review - thanks for the personal reflections. And your tattoo of FD is the greatest ink ever.


Jonfaith To speak with candor is often to ache; despite its logic, I am thankful for your pain. It is those observations that link us, however loosely, on this rock we inhabit.


message 12: by knig (new)

knig You say 'When stripped of all I knew, there was literature to keep me sane and give me something to hold on to as my world spiraled out of control around me': its kind of fortuitous I've come across your most excellent review just after reading this article, posted on my GR friend William's status, andwhich I have been mulling over, (and I'm dead serious) all morning:

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/...

about what is the point of literature (fiction, that is), what does it do for us, what does it give us?

So I'm struck by your answer: it keeps us sane.
Amen.


Petra Eggs I read this when I was young and now I think I am inspired to reread it. Very interesting review.


message 14: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Brilliant review as always, I am in total and utter awe of you, you do know that right?


message 15: by Mike (new)

Mike Puma Spenkerz wrote: "I apologize that this isn’t really much of a review"

Actually, this is very much of a review, your review of reading the right book at the right time--that's as much as any of us could ask of you, and what you always deliver. It's also the sort of review that has led so many of us to look forward to any- and everything you write, for us, as if each of us were the only one reading it.


Dolors Spellbinding Spenk, your love for literature oozing from these lines, this is the REAL thing. I actually feel very fortunate to be able to read you and get a glimpse into your life. Thanks for sharing this uplifting thoughts with us.
We are what we read and I think you're a clear example of how books can make us shine. You blind us all with your glowing grace! :))


message 17: by Terry (new)

Terry Well done spenk!


s.penkevich Thanks everyone, sorry for the comment delay:

Ian, Samir: Gracias!

Frances: Gorror, haha I love that term. Thanks. I usually don't like to write reviews like this, I'm more of a stay-out-of-what-your-writing type reviewer, but I felt compelled to talk about this one. And why I love goodreads in general.

Angus: Thanks! I'm glad, I actually almost didn't post this as a review, then went back and added the 2nd paragraph so at least it was review-ish ha.

Samadrita: Thank you so much. And double post all you want, hell, quadruple post ha. I hope you get around to finishing this one. I can see how the middle is dry enough to cause one to pause and never return, but the stuff that happens in the last quarter of the book is unforgettable.

Praveen: Thanks! Glad I'm not alone. This book is crazy good.

Stephen M: Why thank you Stephen, Goodreads wouldn't be the magical place it is without people such as yourself. I've always been amazed at the insight you possess as well as your ability to discuss and debate while always keeping a clear head as well as maintaining the utmost respect and politeness. I felt bad posting this one, I hoped it didn't seem like stepping on toes since you were reading it (I'd been intending to do this for my 100th review, but good books got in the way). I can't wait for your review though. Enjoying it so far? It's one that I feel really comes together late in, before then its just enjoying the ride of emotion and all the shady dealings.

Garima: THank you thank you! Ooo, you must, he is my idol. I started with The Idiot, which was great. I also really love Notes From Underground, which I read right before this book and would highly recommend reading as a precursor to C&P (there are a lot of similar themes touched upon, and Notes has some of his greatest existential rants). I have yet to read Demons or Brothers though, if you do either of those I'll join you! And thank you again. For your comments, and for making goodreads such a great place.

Brian: Thanks! Ha, yeah, I'm glad I got that done. Now I want more...

Jonfaith: Thank you, and very well said. I'm thankful for the pain of those times now in retrospect, as it definitely shaped me into who I am now. Reading Rilke made me really appreciate it, especially all his statements about loneliness and literature. Sometimes solitude is the best mirror into your own soul.

Knig: Wow, great article. Sometimes I'm scared to overthink reading and just see it as another empty way of passing time, like tv, but when I do, I realize it is so much more (at least to me). But yes, keeping sane is the best way I can put it. It gives me something to hold on to, something I feel happy in analyzing and regardless of how lonely I feel, it connects me with people across time and space. DFW said something once to the effect that good literature simultaneously comforts the distressed and distresses the comfortable sides in us. I always liked that. Thank you!

Petra X: THanks. This is one I can't wait to reread some day. I'll use the excuse of trying a different translation ha.

Joanne: Aw, thank you so much. That means a lot. I love this place, it is so cool to be able to share with others. Thanks.

Mike: Why thank you. Yea, i felt maybe I should have put this in a writings folder instead of review though, but just because it is so different than my usual methods of sticking to the story and not my inner emotions. But whatever, I loved this damn book. So thank you, that means a lot to me.

Dolors: Thank you! Ha, I'm glad, I get uncomfortable opening up usually, this is probably the most biographical review I've written (I still cling to my eng101 teachings of leaving myself out of essays. These aren't essays, but you get what I mean). Thank you though, I'm glad this was enjoyable to read, as I really enjoyed writing it (the booze helped ha)

Terry: Thank you!


s.penkevich Sam wrote: "Great stuff!"

Thank you, Sam!


message 20: by Zoe (new) - rated it 5 stars

Zoe Loved your review :)
I would like to know your thoughts on "The brothers Karamazov" next.


message 21: by Garima (new)

Garima Brothers. As soon as you'll finish IJ, let'd do a co-read. (view spoiler)


message 22: by s.penkevich (last edited Jun 05, 2013 10:43AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

s.penkevich Zoe wrote: "Loved your review :)
I would like to know your thoughts on "The brothers Karamazov" next."


I'm excited to read that one, I almost dove into it a few years back but decided to put it on hold. I figure I don't want to have read all the great Dostoevsky works in my early twenties, so I'll still have one to look forward to ha. But it's time soon, I've been missing some Dostoevsky (although his short works are just as good).


s.penkevich Garima wrote: "Brothers. As soon as you'll finish IJ, let'd do a co-read. [spoilers removed]"

Ha, veeeeeery sneaky.


message 24: by Madeleine (new) - added it

Madeleine This review is one of those times I wish the author of the book in question were still alive so there'd be even a sliver of a chance for him to see the kind of heartfelt greatness he inspires in others.

I love it when people write about a favorite novel: To me, knowing the emotions it stirs up and the role it plays for an individual make the book come alive and serve as a testament to its wonders better than a "traditional" review ever could. Anyone can summarize a book and point out its themes but you've given us a map to its well-earned place of significance on your personal landscape.

This was an absolute joy to read. Thank you so much for that and for trusting us enough to share such a significant part of yourself.


s.penkevich Madeleine wrote: "This review is one of those times I wish the author of the book in question were still alive so there'd be even a sliver of a chance for him to see the kind of heartfelt greatness he inspires in ot..."

Thank you so much, Madeleine. That really means a lot, especially from you who are able to so expertly express the emotional resonance of a novel. It was rather fun to write this, and it was much different than anything else I've tried to write. I wish Dostoevsky was alive too, I wanna give that depressed bastard a big hug. But I'm sure he knew he was amazing ha. He might be weirded out to see his face tattooed on my arm though.


Geoff Lovely tribute to not only a perfect book, but the act of loving a perfect book. Merci...


Jeffrey Keeten Awesome, poignant review my friend. One really good thing about having a book as a best friend is the book doesn't drink your BEER.

One thing I have to say about GR is that it has allowed me to feel more like myself. When I moved back to Kansas away from all my book friends that I had cultivated in the business for more than a decade it was like landing in a wilderness. Books here are most likely to be used to wedge under a leg on a table so the table top doesn't rock back and forth. Not exactly a reading population.

Hard core with the tat my friend. I love it!


message 28: by Mark (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mark Excellent job! Felt like we were with you on the dark and dreary journey


message 29: by Gary (new)

Gary  the Bookworm A crushing sense of guilt is more common than you'd think. For me it's part of the anxiety of everyday life in America. Interesting that a Russian felt it too more than 100 years ago.


s.penkevich Geoff: Thank you. I can't speak of this book in anything less that gushing phrases of love ha.

Jeffery: Ha, so true, it leaves all my beer alone (and serves as an enabler, because nothing goes better with a good book than a good beer). Yeah, I really like that Goodreads is like some support group, club, safe-haven, all rolled into one. I bet it was tough being unable to discuss books, or at least books you'd want to discuss. Glad you are here in the goodreadsland to share with us all. Even working in a bookstore I'm unable to say a lot of the things about books that I really want to say, or at least find someone willing to discuss books in the sorts of details we can on here (sometimes I forget I'm not on goodreads and start blabbering away at customers all excitedly to watch them slowly put the book back down ha. Turns out describing a book as 'literary' if often taken as a negative. Like 'if you liked Perks of Being a Wallflower, try Black Swan Green. It's like a more literary version focusing on the growth of the character as a writer...' I have yet to sell a copy of that one haha). And thank you! I'm still decided what author to get on my other arm.

Mark: Thank you, Mark! Thankfully the dreary journey had the brightness of goodreads at the end of the tunnel ha.

Gary: True, it is hard to go about the day to day free from any guilt. I felt like I had been there and murdered those women with the character. I carried that feeling with me, but felt it could probably apply to something I'd done but just wasn't aware of ha.


message 31: by Victoria (new) - added it

Victoria This is a beautiful review. I hope to someday find a book that resonates as deeply for me. It might be this one, who knows; it's on my 'to-read' shelf, anyway. :)


message 32: by Fionnuala (new) - added it

Fionnuala s.penkevich wrote: "It was rather fun to write this, and it was much different than anything else I've tried to write.."

I love that you had such fun thinking back over your experience of Crime and Punishment. And I particularly love that even though you've read a hundred others since, it is still your favourite book!


message 33: by Stephen M (new) - added it

Stephen M It's really hard to say what I think of it so far, because I literally have no idea where it's all going. It's one of those books, for me at least, that I have to know how it ends before I can even talk about it. It's obviously well-written and has some of the most well defined and compelling characters I've read, but I don't know how I feel about the book until I'm done, if that makes any sense.

And thank you so much for the compliments. You are a goodreads top dog now, so I am always impressed by your output and following.


Aubrey Powerful, powerful review, s.penki. It is both heartbreaking and divine that, not only that a book holds so much sway over your existence, but that you would choose to share it with us denizens of the Internet, who for all our common interests are still largely a group of faceless strangers gathered in a huge public forum.

In light of that, it is an honor to be considered worthy of being part of an audience to what feels to be a deeply personal catharsis on your part, and I thank you for it.


Andrew Schirmer Wonderfully personal review, Steve. Though I do not share your love for F.D., your review is a great testament to the power of literature in our lives.


s.penkevich Victoria: I hope you love it as much as I did! I always enjoy finding a new book that really moves me and excites me, even more so a new author. Recently Javier Marias has given me the love-sick literary butterflies, but nothing beats Dostoevsky yet for me.

Fionnuala: Me too, although it would be nice to have that intense of a love for a book again ha. That's why I've held off on Brothers Karamazov though, I feel like it could be the one to top it.

Stephen M: I drove home from work blasting Cave-o-sapien in your honor. I love the part where he says 'he was a killer! a killer!' Totally irrelevant, but had to share. Also, this song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIi_K... from the Handsome Furs. It's basically a Wolf Parade club remix ha. But books, books, that's right, we are here for books. I know what you mean, and this one definitely inches towards the end to keep you in that state of unrest. The overall ending is a bit tame (I see why some people dislike the epilogue even though I felt it wrapped it up well), but there are some incredible scenes right before then. Particularly with Svidrigaïlov. Also, when you are done this is worth check out: Crime and Punishment: A Graphic Novel

Aubrey: Thank you so much Aubrey. Now that my life is completely different than it was then (I often look back on the 2 years I spent in the factory as if it were a dream of mine, it's so disconnected any incongruent with anything else in my life ha) it makes it easy to talk about it and share. And true, the whole sharing with the internet and strangers is definitely something that I try to avoid. Goodreads really was what got me through those long grueling days though - luckily I had a computer and had an excuse to spend long hours working at it in which I would waste many hours just being on this website talking with people ha. Especially in my last months there, I definitely spent at least an hour a day just using goodreads. But thank you, because you are definitely one of the people whose hard work and insight and conversations make this website the great place that it is.

Andrew: Ha, yeah I saw those 2 stars there! That's alright. Thank you!


message 37: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Avila Your best review,s.pen...Also loved this book and the B&K.What a gifted writer.


Deepthi What a lovely review! :)
Feels like déjà vu. After reading your review, I just went back into the time when I read this book. All those emotions, anxiety, sorrow, just came back to me for a while. This book was my first ever serious literature. Dostoyevsky literally changed my life.


s.penkevich Henry wrote: "Your best review,s.pen...Also loved this book and the B&K.What a gifted writer."

Thank you so much, Henry! Yeah, he is definitely my favorite. I can't wait for Brothers Karamazov.


s.penkevich Deepthi wrote: "What a lovely review! :)
Feels like déjà vu. After reading your review, I just went back into the time when I read this book. All those emotions, anxiety, sorrow, just came back to me for a while. ..."


Thanks! There is definitely a full spectrum of intense emotions associated with this book, I'm glad to hear it resonated as deeply with you as it had with me. What a great first book to fall in love with literature with! I see you also enjoyed Brothers and The Idiot (that was my first F.D. novel and I knew I had found an author to read every word from!). Have you read any Hamsun yet? I think you would really enjoy him, especially Hunger, which reminded me a lot of Dostoevsky's Note From Underground. Good to hear he changed your life, he is so amazing! Thanks again.


Rakhi Dalal What an incredible review,Sven and oh!what a journey! I could relate so well to your feelings all along! Similar struggles that I was going through when I read this masterpiece and it immediately made me a Dostoevsky fan! I totally love him, adore his style of writing which leaves such a lasting impression upon heart, not only heart but your entire self. Your review just so moved me. And I shall always be indebted to the friend who introduced me to the author and to all of you great GR friends for being there with me during hard times! Lots of love!


Deepthi Oh yes! I love Karamazov! Very very intense. The chapter "The Grand Inquisitor" just blew me away. That book is awe-inspiring. I never cried my eyes out so much, as much as I did while reading Karamazov. Not because of all the great drama it had (I love Dostoyevsky for that!), but sometimes it's just one simple gesture by a character and it brings tears in your eyes. That is what I love about Dostoyevsky. He knows human soul.
And I can completely relate with what you said about reading every word of his. His prose just scintillates. Very hard to overlook. One of my all time favorite writer. This summer I intend to read his short works, demons and the adolescent. So excited! :)

And no, I haven't read Hamsun yet. *Sad* But I just borrowed "Mysteries" from my university library after reading your reviews on his books. I think he is one of your favorite writers. :)

Sigh! So many books to read. And I know if I do not read them, I might die with suffocation.


Sarah (Presto agitato) This book is one of my all-time favorites as well. Wonderful review.


Ivana nicely said...captured something of that special bond that can exist between a person and a piece of paper somebody bled into...


message 45: by Mala (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mala I had no idea there's so much sadness in your life...You are always leaving such happy & generous comments on others' thread. Crime and Punishment is part of my top five favs too- hope to be a Dostoevsky completist some day!


Arnie I've read a lot of great reviews here(so many more to read), and agree with you about Madeleine's writing, but this one was the best. I read it during the summer of 68, between high school and college and it stuck to me forever. It's often been called the first psychological novel. In any case it's still the best. Glad you picked up on the elements of existentialism too. Might be favorite novel also. When I read the book the Constance Garnet translation was the only one available. Are there any of the newer translations you would recommend? (Question open to all). For all I know you already wrote it, but looking forward to your review of Notes From Underground.


message 47: by Katie (new) - added it

Katie Great review! I'm so excited to read this one day. The Brothers Karamazov is one of my favorite things.


message 48: by Gabi (new)

Gabi Dopazo Jesus Christ Spenk!... that was some digging there... this is much better than a review, this is what reviews should be (more) like, the way you connect with the piece and the parallel journey between the reading and the ready-meal kind of life outside the book. I hate reviews that stick only to the form, the structure, the whys, the hows and all that shit. This is great writing from you. I believe every single word you say, I can even picture you carrying the book like one carries the house keys, your wallet, the thing you own... Heart-condition good writing Spenk, makes the book richer. Best bit for me is when you say:

"Maybe it wasn’t the novel taking root in my soul, perhaps it was due to the cold fall weather that was creeping in at the time, or perhaps it was due to my lack of sleep and early rising to embark on 10-12hr shifts in an unheated factory where I would work away amidst a cloud of aluminum dust, but I felt feverish and ill alongside Raskolnikov and his fever dreams. I don’t think I felt well again until after finishing the book"


s.penkevich Hey, sorry it has been a few days! Thanks everyone.
Rakhi: Thank you! I like that, it definitely leaves a mark on a person as a whole.Glad you love Dostoevsky as well, he is just so cool.

Deepthi: Can't wait to hear what you think of Hamsun! Yeah, he is a close second to Dostoesvky for me. I actually got to read a weird rendition of The Grand Inquisitor chapter for a class once. The professor (it was a world religion course) had re-translated it himself and wrote it into a play. Turns out he changed a bit to fit his opinions though, so I'm looking forward to reading what Dostoevsky actually said ha. And yes, I know what you mean. So many books, so little time.

Sarah: Thank you! Good favorite to have!

Mala: I guess I'd never really looked at it as sadness before, but it definitely was a tough transition. Books made it seem happy, and I was so caught up in being a new father and all the excitement of that at the time that it still seems a happy time. Just not the job I had ha.

Ivana: I love your line about a book being a place where somebody bled into. So true. Thank you!

Arnie: I read the Pevear & Volokhonsky translation of this one and rather enjoyed it (also read their translation of War and Peace). I've read Garnet's version of The Idiot and found that to be much more readable than a lot of people would have you think. Maybe it does sound a bit dated, but this is an old book so I didn't mind at all. I read notes by P&V and also through a different translator, I can't recall his name, but it didn't have a very good flow to it compared to them. That book is fantastic. I should probably reread that one someday to do a review, it has been quite a while.

Moonbutterfly: Yeah, I'm worried if I read that one too soon I'll never find a book to top it haha. Thanks!

Katie: Nice, that is what I hear about tBK, that it is supreme! This one is incredible though, hope you enjoy!

Gabi: Thank you so much! Yeah, I usually avoid getting personal in reviews and try to pretend I'm some academic ha. Which made writing this one so fun. I'm definitely a person that always has a book in hand (sometimes sheepishly, because, lets face it, reading books like Ulysses in public makes me feel like a prick haha.) Thank you though, that means a lot!


message 50: by Taylor (new)

Taylor Well, now I want to read this. Also, excellent tattoo.


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