Nathaniel Turner's Reviews > The Bacta War

The Bacta War by Michael A. Stackpole
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really liked it
Read 3 times. Last read August 18, 2014.

** spoiler alert ** To be honest, I thought that, of all of the X-Wing novels, this one would survive my criticisms best. I recall it being my favorite, back in the day, and I could remember nothing against it.

Unfortunately, upon reading it, I did find a few things to take issue with. For one thing, all of the innuendo and nudge, nudge, wink, wink that went on in the preceding three books was consummated in this one. There was nothing explicit, of course, but innuendo was dropped in favor of stating things outright, and seduction gave way to indulgence. I get the impression that we're supposed to celebrate these events, because most (or all? I don't quite recall) of them are between Corran and Mirax, but it ends up seeming hollow. Perhaps the most damning of all, from my perspective, was when Mirax insisted on the "practice makes perfect" argument for sex prior to marriage, which is ridiculous on the face of it. I could wax confrontational, but suffice it to say, I got the impression that I should be cheering at this moment, and all I could muster was a dissatisfied ugh.

Speaking of marriage, the proposal in the book seems sudden and unromantic. I'm not one to judge short dating cycles; my wife and I decided to marry after only a few months. On the other hand, I saw no justifiable reason for Corran and Mirax to get engaged. If all the features and benefits of marriage are in place without the marriage, why get married? It can confer no sacrament, no covenant, under such conditions. Is it simply a contractual declaration that both parties appreciate the current arrangement, and wish for it to continue? Corran's proposal, at the end of the day, seemed to have exactly that much romance, as well. "I can't think of anyone I would rather flirt with and be seduced by than you," he says, "In fact, I think we should make it permanent."

Be still, my beating heart.

That wasn't the only relational contrivance I found difficult to swallow. The sudden reparations between Corran and Booster, Mirax's father, were startling. At least we are able to see Corran's side of it, even if the conclusion seems a little too easy--but why Booster would suddenly come around is neither clarified nor elucidated. It seems that Corran's response is so irrevocably honorable that Booster has no choice but to accept him.

I have begun with the negative points, but let me not end with them. The relationships seem rushed and contrived; several of the characters fall by the wayside (notably Riv Shiel, whose early death is not startling so much as nonplussing, and Inyri Forge, who had a pivotal role in Wedge's Gamble, but has barely registered since then). On the other hand, we're back in X-Wings all the time; we have grand space battles, devious strategy, clever tactics, and deft political maneuvering that doesn't distract too much from the entertainment. Borsk Fey'lya and his committees are out of the picture, so we're able to press on without endless debates. This is still a very good book, and very nostalgic; it just doesn't quite live up to its "favorite" moniker from ages past.
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