Chris's Reviews > Homegoing

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
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's review
May 01, 2017

it was amazing
bookshelves: adult, historical, life, not-graphic

The personal stories of seven generations of a family, two branches, one each from two half-sisters who never knew of each other in 18th century Ghana. One was married to a British slaver, the other captured and sold by him. One set of stories remains in Africa, the other travels to America. Each of the 14 characters gets a chapter. Each story personifies and personalizes the experience of a time and place, most of them more unhappy than not, damaged by circumstances and people beyond their control. It's an amazing history lesson, made all the more effective by the fact that it's not teaching or preaching, simply telling simple--and moving and engaging--stories.

One passage that stands out as more explicative than the majority, yet that gives a sense of the book's scope--even as it only addresses the final four generations of one branch of the family:
A month passed, and it was time again for Marcus to return to his research. He had been avoiding it because it wasn't going well.

Originally, he'd wanted to focus his work on the convict leasing system that had stolen years off of his great-grandpa H's life, but the deeper into the research he got, the bigger the project got. How could he talk about Great-Grandpa H's story without also talking about his grandma Willie and the millions of other black people who had migrated north, fleeing Jim Crow? And if he mentioned the Great Migration, he'd have to talk about the cities that took that flock in. He'd have to talk about Harlem. And how could he talk about Harlem without mentioning his father's heroin addiction--the stints in prison, the criminal record? And if he was going to talk about heroin in Harlem in the '60s, wouldn't he also have to talk about crack everywhere in the '80s? And if he wrote about crack, he'd inevitably be writing, too, about the "war on drugs." And if he started talking about the war on drugs, he'd be talking about how nearly half of the black men he grew up with were on their way either into or out of what had become the harshest prison system in the world. And if he talked about why friends from his hood were doing five-year bids for possession of marijuana when nearly all the white people he'd gone to college with smoked it openly every day, he'd get so angry that he'd slam the research book on the table of the beautiful but deadly silent Lane Reading Room of Green Library of Stanford University. And if he slammed the book down, then everyone in the room would stare and all they would see would be his skin and his anger, and they'd think they knew something about him, and it would be the same something that had justified putting his great-grandpa H in prison, only it would be different too, less obvious than it once was. . . .

It was one thing to research something, another thing entirely to have lived it. To have felt it. How could he explain to Marjorie that what he wanted to capture with his project was the feeling of time, of having been a part of something that stretched so far back, was so impossibly large, that it was easy to forget that she, and he, and everyone else, existed in it--not apart from it, but inside of it.

How could he explain to Marjorie that he wasn't supposed to be here? Alive. Free. That the fact that he had been born, that he wasn't in a jail cell somewhere, was not by dint of his pulling himself up by the bootstraps, not by hard work or belief in the American Dream, but by mere chance. He had only heard tell of his great-grandpa H from Ma Willie, but those stories were enough to make him weep and to fill him with pride. Two-Shovel H they had called him. But what had they called his father or his father before him? What of the mothers? They had been products of their time, and walking in Birmingham now, Marcus was an accumulation of these times. That was the point.
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Quotes Chris Liked

Yaa Gyasi
“The need to call this thing “good” and this thing “bad,” this thing “white” and this thing “black,” was an impulse that Effia did not understand. In her village, everything was everything. Everything bore the weight of everything else.”
Yaa Gyasi, Homegoing

Yaa Gyasi
“We believe the one who has power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So when you study history, you must ask yourself, Whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth? Once you have figured that out, you must find that story too. From there you get a clearer, yet still imperfect, picture.”
Yaa Gyasi, Homegoing

Yaa Gyasi
“History is Storytelling.”
Yaa Gyasi, Homegoing


Reading Progress

Finished Reading
May 1, 2017 – Shelved
May 1, 2017 – Shelved as: adult
May 1, 2017 – Shelved as: historical
May 1, 2017 – Shelved as: life
May 1, 2017 – Shelved as: not-graphic

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