Michael's Reviews > The Mysteries of Udolpho

The Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Radcliffe
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
65909643
's review

really liked it
bookshelves: gothic, currently-reading
Reading for the 4th time. Most recently started April 18, 2018.

I'm reading this book again to get back in touch with some of the early English gothic novels. I'm struck, in these early pages, by the extreme romanticization and lush description of nature. The natural world has a sort of earthy goodness that draws Emily and her father in. By contrast, the characters who are more urbane are invariably depicted as manipulative and ruthless.
56 likes · flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Mysteries of Udolpho.
Sign In »

Reading Progress

Finished Reading
Finished Reading (Kindle Edition)
April 25, 2017 – Shelved
April 25, 2017 – Shelved (Kindle Edition)
April 25, 2017 – Shelved as: gothic (Kindle Edition)
April 25, 2017 – Shelved as: gothic
April 27, 2017 – Started Reading
June 14, 2017 – Finished Reading
April 18, 2018 – Started Reading

Comments Showing 1-2 of 2 (2 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Gary (new)

Gary Inbinder I believe Radcliffe was known for writing Gothic Romances in which supernatural horrors were ultimately traced to natural causes, or things that could be explained rationally. In that regard, she may have anticipated a story like Conan Doyle's "The Hound of the Baskervilles" by more than a century.


Michael Gary wrote: "I believe Radcliffe was known for writing Gothic Romances in which supernatural horrors were ultimately traced to natural causes, or things that could be explained rationally. In that regard, she m..."

Thanks so much, Gary, and you're exactly right. It's interesting how Radcliffe's supernatural elements are ultimately explained in a realistic way. I haven't gotten there yet on this read, but it's interesting how different she is in this respect from many other gothic writers, and how, as you say, she presages Victorians like Conan Doyle. Such fascinating material here!


back to top