Toby's Reviews > Blood and Bone

Blood and Bone by Daniel Davis Wood
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it was amazing
bookshelves: lit, favourites

This book sits at the very peak of Australian literature alongside Wake in Fright, written with skill and creativity, self awareness and heart. Never shy of showing its people how they truly are, not how they wish they were. It is a dark and intense look at a time in recent history the majority of decent people would prefer never to have happened and sadly a time that many people wish was still happening. A powerfully written exploration of the author's own family history, colonialism the nature of writing creative non-fiction and the constantly shifting boundary between the creative and the facts (also excellently demonstrated by Laurent Binet in his superb HHHH) and the effect that such storytelling can have on the teller as well as their audience. Davis Wood has a strong literary voice, his work though similar to Macrae Burnet's His Bloody Project finding much greater resonance and meaning through a lack of gimmickry and the immediacy of his narration.

Personally I find it scandalous that this novel is so completely unheralded, even here in its country of origin. Reminiscent of some of those great historical Appalachian hick-lit novels from the likes of Woodrell, McCarthy and Carlos Blake et al in its sense of place, intensity of prose and dark subject matter, as well as being an exciting pseudo creative non-fiction novel, Australians need to celebrate such talent, we need to laud these brave and interesting literary voices and then we need to turn them in to dark, brooding cinema.
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Reading Progress

February 8, 2017 – Started Reading
February 8, 2017 – Shelved
February 9, 2017 –
page 39
18.4%
February 10, 2017 –
page 100
47.17% "This may well be the finest contemporary novel by an Australian author about Australia. Reminiscent of some of those great historical Appalachian hick-lit novels from the likes of Woodrell and Carlos Blake et al in its sense of place, intensity of prose and dark subject matter. As well as being an exciting pseudo creative non-fiction novel. It is scandalous that it's so completely unheralded."
February 11, 2017 – Finished Reading

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