Barry Pierce's Reviews > The Fault in Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
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did not like it
bookshelves: 21st-century, read-in-2012

I feel so sorry for these privileged, middle-class, white teenagers.
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Reading Progress

June 28, 2011 – Shelved
January 12, 2012 – Started Reading
January 12, 2012 –
page 4
1.28%
January 13, 2012 –
page 34
10.86%
January 14, 2012 –
page 58
18.53%
January 14, 2012 –
page 74
23.64%
January 14, 2012 –
page 91
29.07%
January 14, 2012 –
0.0% "So far this is my favourite John Green book. I'm getting through it pretty quickly (by my standards) as well!"
January 14, 2012 –
page 100
31.95%
January 14, 2012 –
page 121
38.66%
January 14, 2012 –
page 136
43.45% "That's my reading of TFiOS done for today. I hope I finish it off tomorrow so I can have a review up by tomorrow night or Monday."
January 15, 2012 –
page 168
53.67%
January 15, 2012 –
page 183
58.47%
January 15, 2012 –
0.0% "On a food break from reading."
January 15, 2012 –
page 188
60.06%
January 15, 2012 –
page 211
67.41%
January 15, 2012 –
page 236
75.4%
January 15, 2012 –
page 251
80.19% "Okay, break time. I'll get back to this later."
January 15, 2012 –
page 264
84.35%
January 15, 2012 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-50 of 51 (51 new)


Olivia McGovern I just got that book! Can't wait to read it!


message 2: by Miriam (new) - added it

Miriam lol


message 3: by Péter (new)

Péter YOU! ARE! A! HERO!


Jazmin I can't even think about this book without getting annoyed!


message 5: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa Watched the movie. Cried. Decided to read the book. Totally bored me so didn't finish it.


Anna Little I get that there privileged and middle class and compared to other people in the world there pain counts for next to nothing. But what does it matter? Honestly I don't know what the point is in comparing your suffering to other people who have it worse doesn't in any way lessen the pain your feeling. I'm a privileged, middle class, white teenager and although the bad things that I go through when you put them up to others compare to almost nothing but couldn't you say that about everything. Who cares if Hazel and Augustus suffer less than most people the point is that we suffered and that we can relate to them.


Amanda Pearl the movie is worse.


Michaela Leick As a former ill teenager and current chronically ill young adult, this book just rubs me the wrong way. There were a few parts that resonated, but the majority was ridiculously frustrating. I think the worst part is the mindless popularity of this book and the subsequent "fetishization of illness" that has followed.


Ahmed I didn't like the book very much either but I don't think your comment is valid. Pain is not relative, it is absolute. You cannot dismiss someone's suffering because they have what you perceive to be a "privileged" life.


message 10: by Stef (new) - rated it 2 stars

Stef Rozitis Barry thanks for saying that. That was exactly my thoughts. So oblivious too


Dhruv Patel How dare you! This book isn't about a privileged class. Your English teacher obviously never taught you much. If you analyzed this book literary style, you would have understood that it is rather about life struggles. I hate to break it to you, but cancer affects everyone from any class! Your review makes no sense. Are you ultimately saying that this book would be better if it didn't take place in a suburban neighborhood? You missed the point of the book completely.


message 12: by Barry (new) - rated it 1 star

Barry Pierce Dhruv wrote: "How dare you! This book isn't about a privileged class. Your English teacher obviously never taught you much. If you analyzed this book literary style, you would have understood that it is rather a..."

*pats head* Thank you for your wonderful contribution. It really gave me a good laugh.


message 13: by Roberta (last edited Mar 13, 2015 04:45PM) (new) - added it

Roberta Trevisan Marques de Souza I would like to read… just to read. I'm not expecting for something special.


message 14: by Chayan (new)

Chayan Banerjee I agree with you Barry, and it's too sugary,


Andrea Robyn I still really liked this book but I do understand and can somewhat relate to your opinion, Barry. Although I do have to ask - considering the intense rage you possess towards John Green why do you have many of his books on your shelf? I don't know if you still do, but you did in your last book shelf tour.


Larissa Rowan I can understand your opinion, and honestly your brutality makes me laugh, but I have to say not liking the book because you don't like John Green is one thing but saying you dislike it because the suffering isn't the worst suffering that could be happening to these young adults is another. First of all you must have known from the blurb that this wasn't going to be about the suffering of 'under-privileged, lower-class, non-white teenagers', so why judge it for not being about that? Suffering is suffering and is painful to those it effects even if it is minute in comparison to someone else's. However, like I said, your brutality makes me chuckle.


message 17: by Stef (new) - rated it 2 stars

Stef Rozitis Larissa (and others with similar perspective) It's not brutal to point out that the self-pity and privilege not to mention "cancer perks" available to such a small proportion of people who suffer (who are so wrapped up in the self that they are even oblivious to the non-universality of their experience as is their author) is more romantic than truly humanizing. Dying sucks for anyone. Dying painfully sucks for anyone. But these are not exactly battlers. There are spoilt, entitled, narcissistic people who make absolute statements as if their experience is the only real experience. The author (as you point out)has every right to write about whoever he chooses. And yes the suffering is real. But excuse some of us with less privileged experiences of suffering for not being as moved as people think we ought.
Not all of us for example can try to fin meaning in our suffering by travelling the world and hassling famous authors, then when getting less than perfect satisfaction having a dream date. They didn't strive for this, it fell in their laps. Social class is absolutely relevant to any analytical reading of this book


Larissa Rowan Yeah, I get why people aren't moved by the kind of suffering that Green represents in his novel and I get why you wouldn't like the characters because yes they are selfish, narcissistic and pretentious (John Green is quite a pretentious writer anyway). However, I'm was just merely pointing out that we all knew before we read the book that it wasn't going to be a gritty and heartbreaking story of the brutality and suffering of under privileged, middle-class, non-white teenagers. I was just merely suggesting that these are over simplified reasons to dislike the book and honestly I get why you, like many others, don't like the novel!


message 19: by Erin (new) - rated it 5 stars

Erin Woo On the other hand, they both have cancer, which could be a reason why you might feel sorry for them. Just saying.


Lindsay Fouts “Cancer doesn’t give a shit how much you want to live. If it wants to kill you, it will.”
― A.S. King, Ask the Passengers


Lindsay Fouts cancer doesn't care what race you are or how much money you have either


message 22: by Stef (new) - rated it 2 stars

Stef Rozitis Precisely. Which is why it is alienating that only white rich people ever get to tell their story and try to touch our feelings!


ᏒIᎪlᎥstᎥc I hated this with a burning passion.


message 24: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Powers I'd argue that cancer is cancer. Cancer doesn't care what social class you're from of what you cater to.


No matter how privileged they were...well, they were bloody dying, so I'd say it makes up for it...


message 25: by Karen (new) - rated it 1 star

Karen Lollllllll your review made me laugh!!!

I actually forgot that that was exactly one of the major things I really despised about this book: the wishes that were so easily granted. Like, as if this couldn't get more obvious, that she'd somehow get to go on this trip that they won't stop talking about!


Sarah Callie I know right? All these privileged teenagers who are connecting with a story about cancer and suffering. They Really piss me of.


Sarah Callie I know right? All these privileged teenagers who are connecting with a story about cancer and suffering. They Really piss me of.


Sarah Callie I know right? All these privileged teenagers who are connecting with a story about cancer and suffering. They Really piss me of.


RiriSubs I totally agree. It was the same for me.


message 30: by FoodxHugs (new) - added it

FoodxHugs haha, I laughed! xD


Graham Cracker Dude Yeah, but they are DYING. That's the point.


Magari Sorry us middle class white teenagers aren't deserving of your sympathy...


message 33: by Stargirl (new)

Stargirl feel sorry cause theyre dying


message 34: by Chris Apolant (new)

Chris Apolant And you are neither white nor middle class, I take it?


Holden I wish I could like the comments!


Devin Racist and rude.


message 37: by Barry (new) - rated it 1 star

Barry Pierce Devin wrote: "Racist and rude."

I don't think you know what racism is.


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

Barry wrote: "Devin wrote: "Racist and rude."

I don't think you know what racism is."


Define racism, then.


message 39: by Barry (new) - rated it 1 star

Barry Pierce Juan wrote: "Barry wrote: "Devin wrote: "Racist and rude."

I don't think you know what racism is."

Define racism, then."


If you think pointing out the whiteness of characters is racism then honey you've got a big storm comin'


Holden It is racism because their ‘whiteness’ has nothing to do with anything in this story. Guess what? White teenagers can get cancer too.


message 41: by Brice (new)

Brice reading all of these “reverse racism is a real issue” comments makes me laugh, but im also so terrified of these people, barry. i need to be held. asking you to define racism? do they not own a dictionary? are they unaware of google? there are so many unanswered questions. and worst of all, they find profound meaning in a novel whose most quotable like is “okay. okay.” ?! what has happened :,( as if a white boy who has the money to buy cigarettes, not to smoke, but to literally suck on, was not enough, we are subjected to this “racist and rude” garbage


Holden I do own a dictionary. And that dictionary clearly states that racism is prejudice towards others for their race. So yeah, I think the one who needs a dictionary is you.


message 43: by Barry (new) - rated it 1 star

Barry Pierce Holden (malfunctions without books) wrote: "I do own a dictionary. And that dictionary clearly states that racism is prejudice towards others for their race. So yeah, I think the one who needs a dictionary is you."

It's slightly more complex than that. Racism is more than just a prejudice, it is the systematic oppression of one race by another. Throughout history the oppressor has nearly always been the white man. One could argue it is still the same today. Of course it is impossible to oppress the oppressor, and thus racism towards the white man is simply not possible.


Holden You just described systemic racism, not racism and racist behavior. And whether the white man was the biggest oppressor in history is a matter of perspective. Chinese people would call the Japanese and the Mongols the biggest oppressors in their history. Humans, unfortunately, have the tendency to oppress. Not just white humans. Being white or black isn’t a character trait. Being white doesn’t mean you are more likely to oppress others. White people in history had the means and power to oppress. If that power was reversed it could’ve been the other way around.


Holden And being privileged doesn’t mean you can’t experience pain. That’s like saying it’s not that bad he has cancer, at least he’s white! So he doesn’t have the right to claim he’s suffering. Or thinking that white girl who is poor and suffers from mental illness doesn’t deserve our sympathy. She is poor and sick but hey, she’s white, right?


Mariella So much better to die at 17 knowing you had privilege!


Aspen privileged or not, white or not, they're still dying.


message 48: by Sakeenah (new)

Sakeenah Niazi I mean, just because they're white, we shouldn't hate on them. White people aren't ALL bad. That's like Black people or Muslims getting judged because of a few terrorists. You think these teenagers should die, just because they happen to be born white? That sounds quite similar to white people hating black people because of their skin colour. And having cancer is a privilege? Being alive because of medication is a privilege? I'm sorry, it sounds like you haven't read the book.


claudia perez cool


claudia perez well everything is different when you actually read the book before. For me i need to read the book before to understand the plot of the movie. Otherwise i cant understand, my learning process is wierd. dont judge me.


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