Shelly's Reviews > A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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Jun 09, 2011

it was amazing
bookshelves: classics, my-all-time-favorites, nook-books

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Quotes Shelly Liked

Charles Dickens
“It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“You have been the last dream of my soul.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“The cloud of caring for nothing, which overshadowed him with such a fatal darkness, was very rarely pierced by the light within him.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“Of little worth as life is when we misuse it, it is worth that effort. It would cost nothing to lay down if it were not.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
tags: life

Charles Dickens
“Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; - the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“There is a man who would give his life to keep a life you love beside you.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“Think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“Above all, one hideous figure grew as familiar as if it had been before the general gaze from the foundations of the world - the figure of the sharp female called La Guillotine.
It was the popular theme for jests; it was the best cure for headache, it infallibly prevented hair from turning gray, it imparted a peculiar delicacy to the complexion, it was the National Razor which shaved close: who kissed La Guillotine looked through the little window and sneezed into the sack.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“Since I knew you, I have been troubled by a remorse that I thought would never reproach me again, and have heard whispers from old voices impelling me upward, that I thought were silent for ever. I have had unformed ideas of striving afresh, beginning anew, shaking off sloth and sensuality, and fighting out the abandoned fight. A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
“I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss. I see the lives for which I lay down my life, peaceful, useful, prosperous and happy. I see that I hold a sanctuary in their hearts, and in the hearts of their descendants, generations hence. It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities


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