Scott Holstad's Reviews > Rainbows End

Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge
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Oct 16, 2016

it was ok
bookshelves: didn-t-finish

I admittedly haven't read much Vernor Vinge, but I know some of his books have won several Hugo Awards, including this one. But whenever I read him, I just don't enjoy his books. Admittedly, Vinge is an idea guy. He comes up with big ideas, world building stuff that can fascinate and allow the reader to explore new concepts and realms of being. But not in this book. In this book, the setting is just a few years in our future here on Earth and it's not a big concept world he creates. It's a little too plausible. A former "great" and famous poet from our current era (now) pretty much dies of Alzheimer's and is revived by his family roughly 10-15 years in the future. He has no clue what is and has happened. He discovers the world has changed and everyone uses wearable computers and are jacked into a worldwide network (Internet) and there is no demand for any type of former skills the elderly had. Indeed, the only careers I can recall people having in this book are kids and old people going to vocational tech high schools and normally aged adults joining the military. There's not much else. There are people who are about to be former librarians, because all of the books in the world's libraries are being destroyed because they're all being digitized. So, Robert Gu, the protagonist, is sent back to this votech high school to learn some skills that will translate into a real world job, one where information is the only source of monetary income and where data exchange is the only thing that most of that future's young people care about.

One of the early things we learn about in the book is there is some secret plot to create a subliminal virus in a tv medium so it can take over the world and it is being brought about and handled by one person, one of the "good" guys, or so people are led to believe. There's also a super powerful AI named "Rabbit," who we never learn much about, but who plays a major role in the book. Speaking of never learning much about, that applies to most of the characters besides Gu, and we don't necessarily learn enough about him to care enough about what happens to him in this book. He turns from former world class poet into a data junkie with the help of a loser teenager who is always looking for a type of big score and they make an odd pair. And they collaborate on high school projects, but we never really see how. In fact, we're never really shown how much of this futuristic, yet oh so possibly real, tech is literally used. However, back to what I was saying. Gu's family is sick of him living with them, so they urge him to learn enough at high school to enable him to get a job (seriously? what type? doing what? he's taking shop!), so he can move out. Great family. Completely dysfunctional. We never learn very much about any of the characters. They're flat, they're not very important, most of the interesting ones don't even make enough appearances to allow us to get to know them. Characterization is a problem, then, in this book. So, too, the plot. I tried getting into it, but it just didn't resonate with me. This super secret horrible plot to take over the world, this international crisis, is being constructed at UC San Diego and yet, I didn't ever really get the idea that it was seriously that big of a deal. A subliminal virus? Oh wow, what a freaking nightmare! Worse than a nuclear bomb, clearly. Dear God, what will we do if it is released into the world? Oh man, who gives a shit? I just don't care. And that's a major point. In the end, what does the reader truly care about this book? Because to me, it was just not very interesting. I couldn't relate to the characters, I thought the plot was damn stupid, I thought the technology, while moderately interesting, was close enough to today's reality so that it didn't really stretch my imagination enough to actually call it sci fi. It's simply current reality, sped up by a decade. Big deal. And seniors who were successful CEOs, professors, career big shots returning to a vocational high school to learn new skills so that they can get a job in this futuristic society? That simply strikes me as stupid.

On the whole, Vinge, the idea guy who's usually full of major universe shattering ideas, does almost nothing in this book to merit placing it up against his other works and I'm shocked this won the Hugo. I'd love to know what books were his competition that year, because it must have been a lean year for sci fi books. This book could have used some help with the dialogue, with character development, with plot development, with technology development, and perhaps a few others things. As far as I'm concerned, this book was a disappointment to me and I'm giving it two stars (although it probably deserves one) and stating that I simply can't recommend it.
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Reading Progress

July 4, 2016 – Shelved
July 4, 2016 – Shelved as: to-read
September 14, 2016 – Started Reading
September 18, 2016 –
page 122
32.02%
October 16, 2016 –
page 217
56.96%
October 16, 2016 – Shelved as: didn-t-finish
October 16, 2016 – Finished Reading

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