Yosep's Reviews > The 48 Laws of Power

The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
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For all the readers and reviewers who don't "get" or like this book, here's what you are not getting: It is fact. This book is not teaching anyone to be amoral. It is teaching you how people really are in the real world. It separates the behaviors and tactics of people in history who have succeeded and failed into the 48 "Laws". It is an explanation of power in the only way it can be expressed.
If you don't want to be a deceitful heartless prick who does whatever he can to whomever all for personal gain, then I praise you. However, YOU STILL NEED TO READ THIS BOOK to protect yourself from aforementioned amoral deceitful pricks. I read this book with this understanding(which Greene also suggests in the book), and came away from it very enlightened. Live your life as you see fit, but I always recommend facing reality in its purest rawest form, and this book really uncovers the seedy underbelly of how powerful people interact with one another.
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
May 6, 2011 – Shelved

Comments Showing 1-9 of 9 (9 new)

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message 1: by Natalia (new)

Natalia Popovitch Well said


Acidtripdxm Indeed


Acidtripdxm Indeed


Acidtripdxm Indeed


Erin I couldn't agree more! It scares me a little that so many people are unable to read something objectively and learn from it, even if they disagree with it. I don't feel like Greene advocated one way or the other and personally, I wouldn't care if he did. What he's doing is making observations about human nature. It's a fact - people use power for good and evil all day long, all around the world. You're extremely naive if you don't see these things being applied all around you in your daily life. Personally, I'd rather be aware of what's going on around me, rather than be a sheep that's being led around by wolves.


message 6: by Robert (new)

Robert Adeleke Yea!


Charlena Jackson Yosep,

You said it best, "For all the readers and reviewers who don't "get" or like this book, here's what you are not getting: It is fact. This book is not teaching anyone to be amoral. It is teaching you how people really are in the real world."

This book isn't for someone to like or dislike-- It shows us "people" character. This book is more so a "cheat sheet" to what to expect from people.

It is more so of a --- "I do not want to hear I didn't warn you." or a... "I told you so." ... or "The choice is yours."

That is how I looked at "48 Laws." I wasn't offended by the words-- I was more tune in..

More so to each it's own..

People-- Do not take the book personal-- look at the book as a give or take; a lesson to learn or ignore.. It is how one go by receiving the book.


message 8: by Jorge (last edited Dec 11, 2017 06:23AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Jorge Bravo You are so wrong! The author, unlike Machiavelli, explicitly tells us what we should do in order to be in compliance with the law. This book appears to be intended for businessmen. It’s absolutely unethical. Furthermore, it picks and chooses randomly any other event in the past to justify its “law”. We could pick and choose any other examples in the past to prove the opposite.
Gross, inaccurate, unethical and false. However, some meager good advice can be found. Stick to those.


Little Miss Esoteric It's sociopathic to be sure, but I agree, well worth reading to gain a real understanding of how power, control and manipulation work in the world around us. It took me two attempts to read and stomach the contents but now I'm glad I did.


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