Chris Little's Reviews > A Reformed Approach to Science and Scripture

A Reformed Approach to Science and Scripture by Keith A. Mathison
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Recommended to Chris by: Kamal Weerakoon

A good thing about buying a book that really is a book is that you get a sense of what kind of book it wants to be. A 600 page treatment is a different beast from an 80 page piece - neither is necessarily better, but the aims will differ.

With an ebook, this is harder. And, perhaps, easier to be disappointed. 'I thought this was going to be in-depth, but it's only a brief guide.' Or, 'I just wanted something simple, not the history of the universe.'

So let's explain the intangibles of this book. A Reformed Approach to Science and Scripture is a big title, huge. Science! Scripture! Reformed! Wow. Yet it's not broad, deep, and exhaustive. It is a short work, so does not aim to cover all things.

Even more important, it's not even really trying to be a reformed introduction to the philosophy of science. (Which I thought it might be - my mistake.) Instead, it is an expansion on some comments made by R.C. Sproul. At a conference, Sproul was answering the question, 'How old is the universe?'

Sproul's answer is wonderful. He did not merely indicate young or old, but in a few sentences touched on science, Christianity, and the relation between them.

The answer is quoted in full (tidied up a little for publication purposes). Sproul notes some of the issues:
* The Bible does not state how old the earth is, but some hints suggest it's young
* Science has plenty to say that is relevant: expanding universe, astronomical dating, etc
* All truth is God's truth, scripture and nature
* God's revelation in scripture is infallible as also God's revelation in nature is infallible
* We know times when natural revelation has corrected the church's understanding of special revelation
* Nonetheless, that which is definitively taught in the Bible is never overthrown by science
* That is, scientists can be wrong, theologians can be wrong, and we privilege neither
* In conclusion: 'I don't know how old the earth is.'

This book by Mathison expands on these points. It has some theological points (eg, Augustine, Aquinas). It has some history (eg, Calvin and Luther on the geocentrism). It does not have much science or philosophy of science.

The crux of the book - and of Sproul's answer - is the double infallibility of God's double revelation, special and natural. This is, I think, both the strength and the weakness of the book's argument.

It is strong, because it highlights the unity of all truth in God. Let God be true, though all men be liars (Romans 3:4). The saying catches it nicely: all truth is God's truth.

Yet there are problems with the book's argument. I think these are in the theological terminology used, as well as it's application in the book. Imprecision is introduced: it does no real damage to this book's argument, because it has a narrow focus. But such imprecision is problematic if it flows through the (huge) scope of science-theology understanding.

The problem: Mathison persists in speaking of natural revelation, when I think he would do better to speak of truth.

In speaking of natural revelation, Mathison has in mind the knowledge of God accessible to all humans through creation. As Romans 1:19-21 indicates, this knowledge is about God, and it makes us without excuse, because natural revelation cannot save. He helpfully quotes and alludes to Romans 1.

But the book then slides from this knowledge about God to science, without any reason put forward for the connection. Yet it is not evident that knowing more about the planets' arrangement adds anything to natural revelation. We know more truth, certainly, but no more about God.

In other words, Mathison makes no convincing argument that the theological category of natural revelation also applies to science.

This imprecision has other effects. I note just one - the use of infallible.

Mathison return more than once to a group of seminarians asked two questions by Sproul.
"How many of you believe that God's revelation in Scripture is infallible?" They all raised their hands. I then asked, "And how many of you believe that God's revelation in nature is infallible?" No one raised his hand. It's the same God giving the revelation.


Two helpful and provocative questions to put! Natural revelation is, indeed, infallible - it does not fail but achieves its purpose. The purposes of natural revelation succeed: people of faith praise the Lord (Psalm 19:1), and rebels against God find they have no excuse (Romans 1:20).

Infallibility is a term of theology, and relates to God's purposes in his revelation. But Mathison, having assumed a tight link between natural revelation and science, has thereby partly imported infallibility into science, where it does not belong.

Now, that's a long discussion about being precise in terminology. So let me emphasise this: I think this work well worth reading. Have a read, think well, and thank God that all truth is his.
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May 11, 2016 – Shelved
May 11, 2016 – Finished Reading

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