Aureo Zanon's Reviews > The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople

The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople by Jonathan Phillips
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really liked it

I honestly would rate this book a 4.7 out of 5, due to the lack of information on the Papal States. I'm often left wondering how the conditions of the Papal States are whether they are prosperous or losing money. Other than that, I really enjoyed reading this book, due to the many different perspectives it gives on the crusades. The quotes put into the book are adequate and very interesting, whether it be calling the Arabs "savages" or it be a sermon given by Innocent. Although people on good reads say the crusades were pointless and provided no advancement to the world, I find it extremely interesting how Venice was able to diverge the crusades to sack Constantinople and got rich off of it.
Honestly I would recommend this book to anyone, although people who like history are more prevalent among these types of books, I feel that this book gives good insight of the medieval ages and is relatively easy to pick up. This book in particular is extremely excellent at giving a clear picture of what is going on, although sometimes you can forget some of the major "players" in the crusades and you may need to read about them again. This book also gave an non-opinionated view of the crusades and made it so much better. Previously I have read many books on the crusades, this one in particular taught me the most about the shocking and bloody era.
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Reading Progress

May 8, 2016 – Started Reading
May 8, 2016 – Shelved
May 8, 2016 –
page 37
9.89% "Pope Gregory VIII, in his last dying words, is devastated by the loss of Jerusalem after it's recapture in the Third Crusades. The loss of the holy city was caused by the triumphant victories won by Saladin, a Muslim leader, thusly winning the jihad, that he had declared. Now it is all up to the successor of Gregory to unite the nations around him to retake Jerusalem."
May 23, 2016 –
page 52
13.9% "It impresses to know how eager people where to join the crusades, people would blindly follow in order to gain martyrdom. Another crucial motivator, was the recovery of the True Cross which had been captured by the "savages" of Saladeen's army."
May 23, 2016 –
page 67
17.91% "The True Cross is an interesting artifact since there is no way of proving if it is genuine, the cross was split into two parts 1 part remained in Jerusalem and the other remained in Istanbul/Constantinople. The relic was marched into battles as a talisman to the Gauls. When Jerusalem was captured by Saladeen the relic, people were devastated."
May 23, 2016 –
page 82
21.93% "After doing a bit of research I began to wonder about what relics were found during the crusades. A famous one is the crown of horns which was sold to the French King for a lot of money. Genuinely, I would feel scammed if such an offer were given to me."
May 24, 2016 –
page 97
25.94% "Medieval tournaments is an event which is referenced throughout media, whether it be the jousting or the duels, everyone pretty much knows about them. But during the crusades, they were a popular form of recruitment and training for crusaders."
May 24, 2016 –
page 112
29.95% "It is now evident that Venice played a crucial role on the crusades, not only did they provide galleys, they also ended up diverting the whole point of the crusades. Doge Enrico Dandalo asks the Papal States to given him 60,000 British silvers in exchange for their ships, which would accommodate over 86,000 men."
May 26, 2016 –
page 127
33.96% "I wonder sometimes why people would be so willing to die for a cause, is that cause beyond them, will it grant them rewards. That's practically how the crusades worked out, by the end of the crusades Pope Innocent was one of the most influential people in Europe."
May 26, 2016 –
page 132
35.29% "The city of Venice quickly became a major trade power during the crusades, not only did it assist the French crusaders to the holy city. It quickly became a large trading center due to the attention from the crusades."
May 26, 2016 –
page 132
35.29%
May 26, 2016 –
page 147
39.3% "I really enjoy how multiple quotes are used throughout the chapters, it creates an unbiased perspective of the crusades."
May 30, 2016 –
page 162
43.32% "The book begins to focus on the siege of Zara, a risky move on Venice's end, but extremely helpful since the city could act as a host for crusaders."
May 30, 2016 –
page 162
43.32% "The siege of Zara brought many possible troubles to Venice, such as excommunication. Regardlessly, Venice called for it's crusaders to take it."
May 30, 2016 –
page 177
47.33%
May 30, 2016 –
page 192
51.34% "The siege of Zara was almost like taking candy from a child, the people inside the city walls were practically defenseless, and the King of Hungry couldn't do anything about it."
June 1, 2016 –
page 207
55.35% "The siege is a success and the city of Zara,and now belongs to the crusaders. Innocent is extremely unhappy with the siege of the town, but he can't do anything."
June 1, 2016 –
page 207
55.35%
June 1, 2016 –
page 207
55.35%
June 1, 2016 –
page 212
56.68% "The crusaders refuse to give the small maritime city of Zara, to Venice. This is when conflict begins to arise, the mighty republic refuses to assist on with the crusades, they eventually do give it to the Venetians due to their extreme aid in the crusades."
June 1, 2016 –
page 212
56.68% "I sometimes wish that the author of this book talked a bit more about the Papal States and their condition, without them the whole crusades would've never happened."
June 1, 2016 –
page 212
56.68%
June 1, 2016 –
page 212
56.68%
June 2, 2016 –
page 212
56.68%
September 6, 2016 – Finished Reading

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